The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

The Role and Requisite Competencies of the Public Sector CIO: a Two‑sided Perspective  pp188-199

Val Hooper, Beverley Bunker

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: A considerable body of research exists on the role, and desired capabilities and competencies of the CIO. However, most of these studies have been executed in large, private sector organizations. It seems that the challenges faced by public sect or CIOs are often very different to those in the private sector, and this might place different requirements on them in terms of knowledge and competence, as well as the roles they fulfil. To date, there has been little exploration into such requirements in public entities. To address this gap, exploratory research was conducted into the role and competency expectations of CIOs in the public sector, and into the impact of the public sector context. A dyadic approach, involving both CIOs and their business colleagues, was adopted in order to gain more meaningful insights. Semi‑structured interviews were conducted with both the CIO and the head of their main internal businessŽ partner of 17 local government organizations. The findings indicate that the CIO s and their business partners differ significantly in their views of required competencies. The business partners require a business knowledge and focus similar to theirs, and most manifest scant regard for the technical expertise necessary or the technic al requirements of the organization. IT is there to support them. The government environment often places more onerous constraints on CIOs than in the private sector, especially so in terms of reporting level; the ability to influence strategy; decision m aking flexibility; and resourcing. The findings from this research extend the application of the RBV and also provide greater understanding of the competencies and roles of the CIO. It also provides insights for recruiters of public service IT professiona ls and CIOs, human resources managers, as well as for providers of training programmes.

 

Keywords: Keywords: CIO, competency, knowledge, role, public sector, dyadic approach

 

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Journal Article

The Dilution of Effort in Self‑Evaluating Development Teams: Agile Loafing  pp175-186

John McAvoy, Tom Butler

© Feb 2010 Volume 12 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp129 - 198

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Abstract

Attempts to resolve the problems in software development have concentrated on the tools and methodologies used, despite an acceptance by many that it is a sociological problem. An example of this is the procedures and processes surrounding evaluations within projects, yet ultimately it depends on individuals more than process. This paper examines one of the sociological factors inherent in a software development team to determine its impact on evaluation within a project. Social loafing occurs where individual members of a team demonstrate a tendency not to work as hard as they could or should. This "slacking off" occurs because the team provides a degree of anonymity – the individual feels their lack of work will be hidden from evaluation within the overall output of the team. Some authors purport that Agile Software development teams have low incidences of social loafing (though these are opinions rather than research findings); the contrary can also be argued. An examination of the philosophy behind Agile Software Development, demonstrated by the Agile Manifesto, highlighted the possibility of occurrences of social loafing brought about by the Agile values. Agile espouses the importance of cohesive teams, the empowerment of these teams, and the collective ownership and self‑ evaluation of work by the team. These values map onto factors which are described as affecting social loafing. An investigation of two teams over an eight month period examined if the Agile values could lead to incidences of social loafing, specifically when their work is being evaluated The investigation determined that the opposite was actually the case. This paper then goes on to determine why the findings go against the initial hypothesis and to show the impact this can have on those evaluating software development projects.

 

Keywords: teams, agile software development, social loafing, self-evaluation, participant observation, sociological factors

 

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Journal Article

Requirements Elicitation for the Technology Conception of a Community Information System for the Indigenous Microenterprise: A Contextual Multi‑Analysis Approach on Business and Community Requirements of Batik Making  pp102-115

Nor Laila Md Noor, Ariza Nordin

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011, Editor: Walter Castelnovo and Elena Ferrari, pp1 - 148

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Abstract

Batik is a traditional art form whose charm lies in its power of storytelling. Batik making is practiced by various indigenous communities in Asia and Africa and has evolved into a socio‑economic uplift existing as a cottage industry. The Malaysian batik

 

Keywords: community informatics, requirements engineering, microenterprise, technology adoption, indigenous business, socio-technical system

 

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Journal Article

A Socio‑technical Approach to Designing and Evaluating Industry Oriented Applications  pp163-175

Shah Jahan Miah, John G. Gammack, Don V Kerr

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp149 - 229

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Abstract

Over the past few years many views have emerged that maximize the utilization of design research in Information Systems (IS) application development. A recent insightful debate in the IS community has suggested two major design views in IS research: a) a pragmatic technical artifact orientation, and b) a theory‑grounded user and meta‑artifact focus. The first (pragmatic design‑based) view focuses on explicit knowledge and on a step‑by‑step methodology for innovative artifact design and building. The second (theory‑grounded) view more broadly emphasizes meta‑artifact design in IS development and a more prescriptive guidance approach that is grounded in design research. The debate between these two views leads to the question: which method is more s uitable for Decision Support System (DSS) design? In extending the debate on design views in IS research, this paper evaluates a DSS application through both the utility of the pragmatic and the socio‑technical design research views. This helps create a methodological foundation for industry‑oriented DSS design and evaluation. The findings suggest that both positions have merit, but the latter view of design science is more suitable for industry‑oriented DSS design.

 

Keywords: Socio-technical view, DSS, and Design research.

 

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Journal Article

Critical Organizational Challenges in Delivering Business Value from IT: In Search of Hybrid IT Value Models  pp130-146

Nazareth Nicolian, Christine Welch, Martin Read, Martyn Roberts

© Sep 2015 Volume 18 Issue 2, The special issue from ECIME 2014, Editor: Jan Devos, pp93 - 210

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Abstract

Abstract: This study forms part of a larger research project to explore and analyze the perceived value of IT and the organizational competencies needed to deliver that value. By identifying and evaluating the challenges faced by Lebanese organizations, t his paper provides empirical evidence in support of hybrid models of IT value. While process‑based IT value models provide an explanation for howŽ IT value is created, and what steps occur to create that outcome, they lack the contingency theory found in variance models, which explain whyŽ IT value is realized, and what variable moderate that outcome. On the other hand, variance models alone are also ill‑equipped to explain the greater scope and impacts of IT investments. Hybrid models combine both proc ess and variance perspectives to provide a more comprehensive theory of IT value realization. Structured interviews are conducted with the Chief Information Officers (CIO) of 36 medium and large size Lebanese organizations to discover the challenges fa ced in delivering value from IT investments. Of the 14 challenges discovered, seven point to the need for process orientated competencies and these include Change ManagementŽ, Organizational ReadinessŽ, Relationship ManagementŽ, Benefits ManagementŽ, IT GovernanceŽ, IT Architecture ManagementŽ, and IT Talent ManagementŽ. The other seven challenges are variance oriented and point to the factors that inhibit or enable deriving IT value, and these include internal factors, such as: Family Business O wnershipŽ, and Budgetary ConstraintsŽ, and other external factors, such as: Political/Social/Economic InstabilityŽ, Telecommunications/Bandwidth IssuesŽ, Lack of Governmental IT LawsŽ, Local Cultural IssuesŽ, and Immature Local Suppliers/VendorsŽ. R ather than continuing an already‑saturated research conversation about the dependent variable, IT ValueŽ and whether IT creates business value, this study contributes to the independent variable research stream ‑ the investigation of how to derive value from IT, and when and under which conditionsŽ value is realized, and for conceiving a Hybrid model explaining the IT value proposition.

 

Keywords: Keywords: IT value Models, Organizational IT competencies and IT challenges, ERP CSFs, CIO

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011 / Jan 2012  pp1‑148

Editor: Walter Castelnovo, Elena Ferrari

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Editorial

The papers in this issue of EJISE have been selected from those presented at the 5th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation (ECIME 2011) at the Dipartimento di Informatica e Comunicazione, Università dell'Insubria, Como, Italy on 8‑9 September 2011.

 

The issue has been guest edited bythe Conference Chair, Professor Walter Castelnovo, and the Programme Chair, Professor Elena Ferrari, both from University of Insubria, Como, Italy.

 

walter_castelnovo    elena_ferrari 

 

Keywords: crime analysis, GIS, geostatistics, intelligence-led policing, predictive dissemination, data mining, boundary spanning, IS outsourcing, relationships management, accountability, enterprise records management, organizational memory, records auditing, knowledge economy, measuring effectiveness, performance indicator, assess of knowledge, enterprise information systems, enterprise recourse planning systems, customer relations management systems, supply chain management systems, community informatics, requirements engineering, microenterprise, technology adoption, indigenous business, socio-technical system, SMEs, IT/IS, lemon market theory, ISV, ambient assisted living, field trials, ageing technology users, enterprise architecture, architectural alignment, Zachman framework, TOGAF, GERAM, E2AF, payments, framework, mobile, value, data governance, data management, data quality, framework, business model, business case, strategy, operations, management, implementation

 

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