The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Evaluating Motivational Factors Involved at Different Stages in an IS Outsourcing Decision Process  pp23-30

Linda Bergkvist, Björn Johansson

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

This study evaluates factors involved at different stages in an IS outsourcing decision process. From a theoretical perspective, the motivation for IS outsourcing is often described as a result of three factors: cost reduction, access to technological expertise and focus on core competence. The aim of this paper is to evaluate motivational factors in an outsourcing decision process. The study uses a literature review and a retrospective case study of an outsourcing project in a large Swedish organisation. The idea is to evaluate if there are different factors involved at different stages in an IS outsourcing decision process. It has been found that the cost perspective is often used as a way of motivating the start of the process as well as the result of the process. However, during different stages other factors are involved. The results, based upon the case study, show that the size and reputation of the provider as well as thoughts about the provider's ability to deliver required capability is more important than cost reduction. It can be argued that the impact of IS outsourcing on performance and value of an organisation's IS function can be both positive and negative. To minimise the odds of a negative result, this paper contributes with an evaluation of motivational factors involved at different stages in an IS outsourcing decision process. If they are duly addressed, the chances of a successful IS outsourcing process will improve significantly.

 

Keywords: IS outsourcing decision process, motivational factors, case study, stages in decision-making process

 

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Journal Article

Common Gaps in Information Systems  pp123-132

Juha Kontio

© Sep 2005 Volume 8 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp81 - 142

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Abstract

Information systems and databases in six Finnish organizations are evaluated in this multiple case study research. The main idea of the research was to describe the main gaps in information systems in the case organizations. In each case the gaps are presented with authentic descriptions. The research identified altogether seven different categories of gaps. These are first abstracted to four common categories of gaps: 1) data, 2) infrastructure, 3) turning data into information and 4) people working with the information systems. Finally, the four categories are further abstracted to two common categories of gaps: 1) information and 2) infrastructure.

 

Keywords: Information Systems, IS-Gaps, Databases, Case Study

 

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Journal Article

Post‑Implementation Evaluation of Collaborative Technology: a Case Study in Business Education  pp77-86

Andriani Piki

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

To be successful in their future careers students need to develop diverse skills and qualifications. Firstly, in addition to understanding the course content and the underlying theories, students need to explore the implications that emerge from their practical application and develop their critical thinking and analytical skills. Secondly, students need to gain experience and confidence in working effectively within multidisciplinary and multicultural groups that mirror the situation they are likely to face in their future work environment. Thirdly, they need to familiarise themselves with collaborative technologies (CTs) since these are increasingly used in the workplace to facilitate communication and collaboration between distant co‑workers. To address these learning needs it is essential to incorporate CTs (such as videoconferencing systems) in the curriculum and provide well‑organized opportunities for students to gain hands‑on experience. Nevertheless, what technologies are used does not make the difference between motivated and unmotivated students; it is how these technologies are used that matters. Whilst innovative technologies can be fascinating, they must be properly evaluated and adjusted to specific educational, individual, and group needs in order to be successfully adopted by students. This evaluation entails taking into consideration the context within which the technology will be used (appropriateness evaluation) and the social‑psychological motives for user acceptance (evaluation of user satisfaction). This paper reports the findings from an interpretive case study in postgraduate business education where students were using a state‑of‑the‑art videoconferencing system as part of their workshops and group discussion sessions. This setting provided a suitable social milieu for post‑implementation evaluation of this collaborative technology. Qualitative methods were employed including participant observation, focus groups, and analysis of videoconferencing sessions captured on video. The findings indicate that computer‑supported collaborative learning (CSCL) helps students become confident with using CTs, learn best practices for communicating and collaborating effectively in technology‑mediated settings, and appreciate the impact that technology has on everyday social endeavours. The videoconferencing exercises also engaged students to actively participate in the learning process. Given the duality of technology presence (in educational and business contexts alike) the findings can inform the design of new pedagogical models that maximize the learning potential of CTs.

 

Keywords: computer-supported collaborative learning, CSCL, videoconferencing, collaborative technology, CT, business education, post-implementation evaluation, video-ethnography, case study

 

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Journal Article

Proposal of a Compact IT Value Assessment Method  pp73-82

Przemyslaw Lech

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

This paper contains a proposal of a compact IT value assessment method. It follows the assumption that most methods available for the public are either described in a very general manner or concentrate on one of the evaluation aspects only. The proposed method relates the evaluation approach to the main IT initiative characteristics, such as the investment purpose and IT element to be implemented. Based on these criteria, the evaluation process is shaped by putting emphasis on the relevant evaluation aspects and choosing the relevant evaluation methods. The method design is focused on the ease of use and practical relevance so it can be used by IT practitioners to assess IT initiatives in their organisations. The paper finishes with the case study of the method usage in a mid‑sized production enterprise.

 

Keywords: IT value assessment, IT evaluation, practical method, case study

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009 / Jan 2010  pp1‑96

Editor: Elizabeth Frisk, Kerstin Grunden

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Editorial

This issue represents papers presented at the 3rd European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation. The conference was held in September 2009 at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

 

Keywords: accounting firms, adoption, adoption barriers, business case, case study, cluster analysis (CA), collaborative technology (CT) business education, competitive advantage, complexity, computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), developing countries, developing countries, diffusion of innovation, e-Business adoption, e-government, e-Government portal, enterprise, ERP, European Union (EU) members, EUS, evaluation, executive information system, health informatics, HealthCare information systems, ICT, information and communication technology (ICT), information technology, integration, IT management practices, Jordan., mixed research, performance strategic value, post-implementation evaluation, RFID, satisfaction, small business, supply chain management, sustainability, TAM, technology-organizational-environment (TOE) framework, video conferencing, video-ethnography

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special / Jan 2007  pp1‑122

Editor: Dan Remenyi

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Editorial

Another edition of EJISE brings to the attention of the information systems community 10 more pieces of research into how information systems may be evaluated. The contributions in this issue are from 9 different countries and from a diverse range of universities and business schools.

When I first became actively interested in information systems’ evaluation in 1990 I had no idea of how wide and how deep an issue information systems evaluation was. I had thought that it was worth a few papers and maybe a book or two. Today my view is entirely different and I wonder if the community of information systems academics and practitioners will ever reach a point where by there will be a general agreement as to how to evaluate or assess information systems. My best guess would be that they probably will not.

However as it was put to me at the start of my university studies academics tend to have far more questions than answers and this may not necessarily be a ‘bad’ thing. If we continue to ask the right questions, even if we can’t find definitive answers we are effectively moving the frontier of knowledge forward. And that I suggest is, in the end, the most important objective of academe.

I hope that you will find a number of interesting topics among these 10 papers.

 

Keywords: IS integration, auditing, balanced score card, business process facilitation, case study, confidentiality, domain specific languages, e-Government project evaluation, enterprise information system, CEO framework, ex post evaluation, functional-operational match, ICT benefits, ICT evaluation, ICT project, information economics, Information System Architecture , IS outsourcing , IT evaluation, IT value assessment, knowledge management, meta-modelling tools, motivational factors, user satisfaction surveys, web content management, WLAN

 

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