The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

A Delphi Examination of Inhibitors of The Effective use of Process Industry Enterprise Resource Planning (Erp) Systems: A Case Study of New Zealands Process Industry  pp116-133

Chidi Gerard Ononiwu

© Nov 2013 Volume 16 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp86 - 161

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Abstract

Abstract: An ERP System is among the core information system (IS) software being adopted in the process industries globally. Such systems are claimed to offer strategic and operational improvement to firms supply chain effectiveness. Prior studies have shown that most adopting firms are not achieving the strategic business value identified in the project justification due to employees ineffective use of the system. The gains that such firms have achieved by implementing ERP systems in terms of increas e in operational efficiency are often accompanied by daunting ineffective usability problems. Building on Technology…Organization…Environment (TOE) theory, Task‑Technology Fit (TTF) theory and the theory of usage inhibition, this study examines the in hibitors of the effective use of ERP systems. The study used the Delphi technique to draw from the experiences of a few ERP adopters from New Zealands process industries. Findings suggest that non‑collaborative training among employees, low absorptive ca pacity and system misfit are the top most critical inhibitors. Others inhibitors include inadequate ERP expertise, ERP default attributes, lack of continuous improvement and poor vendors support. The theoretical and practical implications of these findin gs are discussed in the concluding section.

 

Keywords: Keyword: Enterprise resource planning system, Effective use, Delphi methodology, Process

 

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Journal Article

A Citizen Benefit Perspective of Municipal Enterprise Resource Planning Systems  pp85-98

Takauya Chandiwana, Shaun Pather

© May 2016 Volume 19 Issue 2, ECIME 2015, Editor: Elias Pimenidis, pp83 - 134

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Abstract

Abstract: Over the past three decades, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have been adopted by businesses with increasing frequency to improve organisational efficiencies and to remedy fragmentation of information systems across company function s. In the public sector as well, many governments, especially at national and regional levels, have also been recognising the benefits of ERP systems. This paper reports on a case study of a large metropolitan municipality. Qualitative methodologies were employed in the form of in‑depth interviews amongst selected respondents in the selected case. The study used hermeneutical principles of qualitative data analysis to elicit the findings. The research determined that, in addition to improving internal bus iness processes, there are clear benefits to the citizen when public institutes like municipalities implement ERP systems. This study identifies a number of resultant and potential benefits as well as the management practices that are being employed by th e municipal management to ensure maximum ERP system benefit to the citizens. These are, in fact, both indirect benefits which are found generically in any ERP system as well as direct benefits to citizens that are visible. The findings indicate that ERP s ystems promote financial sustainability, lowers overall ICT operational costs, reduce communication costs, enables an efficient budget and results in better overall governance of local governments.

 

Keywords: Keywords: ERP benefits, Information and communication technology, Information systems, Enterprise Resource Planning, ICT benefits management, municipal ERP system

 

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Journal Article

Implementing Business Analytics within the Supply Chain: Success and Fault Factors  pp112-120

Douglas Hawley

© May 2016 Volume 19 Issue 2, ECIME 2015, Editor: Elias Pimenidis, pp83 - 134

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Abstract

Abstract: Implementing business analytics across a large company is more about understanding that organization⠒s culture, than it is about the actual technology. Understanding an organization⠒s motivation, advantages and roadblocks is imperative for s uccessful implementation and benefit. This research examines both the critical success factors along with the implementation faults of the largest steel producer in North America, and discusses how these cultural factors play out on a large scale during a n ERP implementation. First, this research identifies general critical success factors as business plan and vision; change management; communication; ERP team composition, skills and compensation; project management; top management support and championshi p; and system analysis, selection and technical implementation (Hoon Na and Delgado 2006). Then, general implementation faults are identified as operational problems, motivational problems, knowledge problems and regulatory problems (Mayntz 1997 in Nie haves, Klose, Becker 2006). These theories are applied to the specific case of Nucor Steel. Application is contextualized through a historical perspective, identifying a low‑cost business model, and enormous divisional autonomy as hindrances to the imple mentation of a common, shared ERP. A timeline of business analytics at the company is given, beginning in 2002, at which point a culture shift occurred though the acquisition of a major competitor. Divisional autonomy at this time, began to be challenged, leading to easier integration of reporting systems and cross‑company data analysis. Then, details are provided as to how this company is making a case for a new, innovative, business model and how it is developing needed expertise in the area of business analytics. Changes in the steel business are requiring companies to move from a low‑cost model to a value‑added model increasing the need for innovation in all areas of the company. These innovations inevitably require the use of more complex data analyt ics that cut across the entire company, instead

 

Keywords: Keywords: success factors, implementation faults, business analytics, enterprise resource planning, ERP, historical considerations

 

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