The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
For general enquiries email administrator@ejise.com
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation is available here

linkedin-120 

twitter2-125 

fb_logo-125 

 

Journal Article

Evaluation of a Collaborative Learning Environment on a Facebook Forum  pp59-73

M.R. (Ruth) de Villiers, Marco Cobus Pretorius

© Jun 2013 Volume 16 Issue 1, ECIME 2012, Editor: Dr. David Sammon and Dr. Tadhg Nagle, pp1 - 84

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: An academic group and discussion forum were established on Facebook for a cohort of postgraduate students studying Concepts and Principles of eLearning. The Forum had a constructivist, student‑centric ethos, in which students initiated discuss ion topics, while the course leader and administrator facilitated. In previous research, content analysis was undertaken of the discussions, but the present study evaluates the collaborative learning environment on Facebook, investigating social relations hips, study‑related pursuits and the balance between them, as well as considering whether the Group could be viewed as a Web 2.0 application. A literature review shows how social networking by students, initially social, began to overlap with academia, l eading to groups and forums for academic purposes. In mixed‑methods research, qualitative analysis was done on free‑text data to extract themes from students reflective essays and from an exam question, while heuristic evaluation was conducted by expert evaluators, who analysed forum discourse in line with contemporary learning theory and considered the social culture of participation. Findings of the qualitative analysis and results of the heuristic evaluation of forum participation confirmed each other , indicating a good social climate and a conducive, well‑facilitated environment. Inter‑personal relationships were fostered between distance learners, and academic value arose from independent research, peer‑learning and social negotiation. Facebook serv ed well as an environment for collaborative learning, but did not provide a full Web 2.0 environment for the collaborative generation of artifacts or projects.

 

Keywords: Keywords: ELearning, Facebook group, heuristic evaluation, discussion forum, qualitative analysis, Web 2.0

 

Share |

Journal Article

Use, Perception and Attitude of University Students Towards Facebook and Twitter  pp200-210

Kevin Johnston, Mei-Miao Chen, Magnus Hauman

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: As social computing systems persist over time, many elements such as user experience, perceptions, attitudes and interactions may change. Facebook and Twitter are two social computing systems that have become increasingly popular among universit y students. This research replicated previous studies by Lampe, Ellison and Steinfield (2008), and Johnston, Tanner, Lalla and Kawalski (2013) to assess how Facebook and Twitter use, perception and attitude have changed among university students. Beca use online social networks, social networking sites and micro‑blogging sites are relatively new as areas of academic research, there is limited research into the impacts of these social networking and micro‑blogging sites. A sample of 486 students from th e University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa completed a survey. The results were then compared to research data from previous studies by Lampe et al. (2008) and Johnston et al. (2013). The results showed that the percentage of students using Face book increased to 95%, Facebook daily usage and the number of Facebook friends doubled from previous surveys. This results also found that the South African students are more dependent on using Facebook, in comparison to using Twitter; that their percep tion of Facebook privacy has led to a decrease in personal information shared on Facebook as well as a change in audience perception. The data also shows that UCT students perceive friends and total strangers to be their main audiences on Twitter; the att itude of UCT students towards Facebook remained positive, on the other hand, a less positive attitude was experienced from the students using Twitter; and Facebook is a more popular method for communication between students. The results clearly highlight the changes in usage, attitude and perception of Facebook over time, and provide a starting point for assessing how usage and attitude to Twitter may change. The results also suggest that should therefore make use of social networking software such as Fac ebook and Twitter both in their personal lives, and in

 

Keywords: Keywords: Attitude, change, Facebook, perception, students, Twitter, use

 

Share |

Journal Article

Acceptable and Unacceptable Behaviour on Social Networking Sites: A Study of the Behavioural Norms of Youth on Facebook  pp259-268

Val Hooper, Tarika Kalidas

© Nov 2012 Volume 15 Issue 3, ICIME, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp230 - 287

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

SNS offer many benefits, especially for the youth who are striving to establish their identity as young adults. The youth are the most active users of SNS but are also the biggest perpetrators of behaviour that would not be tolerated offline. Although differences between these two environments have been identified, the link between the underlying behavioural norms and what is regarded as acceptable and unacceptable behaviour online has not been comprehensively explored – even less so how that behaviour is determined. Given the gap in the knowledge and the prevalence of use by the youth, the objectives of this research were to determine: (1) what behaviour is regarded as acceptable/unacceptable on SNS, (2) how that is determined, and (3) whether there are differences between online behavioural norms and those that apply to offline behaviour. Guided by social cognitive theory, qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 youth aged 18‑20 years who had Facebook accounts. Findings indicate there is greater clarity on what is unacceptable behaviour than what is acceptable. Personal behavioural norms appear to guide determination of unacceptable behaviour whereas the lead of others’ indicates acceptable behaviour. Acceptable behaviour appears to be more audience dependent than unacceptable behaviour, and there sre strong indications of herding behaviour with regard to determination of acceptable norms. The lack of clarity regarding acceptable online behavioural norms is distinctly different from the offline environment. The “protection” that the computer screen provides also contributes to the differences between offline and online behaviour. The distinction between types of friends that exists offline is emphasized online because users usually have one Facebook page that serves all audiences as opposed to encountering different groups separately as is the case offline. Online there is also the obligation to befriend people one normally would avoid offline.

 

Keywords: Keywords/Phrases: Social networking sites, behavioural norms, youth, herding behaviour, mimetic theory, Facebook

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 3, ICIME / Nov 2012  pp230‑287

Editor: Dan Remenyi

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Editorial

This issue contains a selection of papers presented at ICIME 2012 in Ankara, Turkey.

 

The special issue was compiled and edited by Professor Dan Remenyi.

 

2 

 

Keywords: ICIME; internet; ethics; facebook; IS; ICT; Conference;

 

Share |