The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

The Impact of IT investment in RSA e‑Commerce SME Organisations!  pp49-56

Sam Lubbe

© Jan 2004 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

This article considers the possibility of a link between organisational performance and information technology (IT) investment intensity in SME organisations practising e‑Commerce for the period 20012002. The answers to the research questions note that in top performing organisations; (i) IT costs as proportions of operating costs were higher; (ii) IT costs as a proportion of turnover was lower, than in weak performing organisations; and (iii) that a positive correlation exists between the Computerisation Index (CI) and the Operating Costs ratio. The investigation also reveals that Chief Executive Officers (CEO)'s expect additional output while planning e‑Commerce operations and keeping IT budgets constant. Evidence is presented that company performance is linked to the level of IT investment intensity in the sample of organisations investigated, even though more output was expected from the IT department.

 

Keywords: Digital Commerce, e-Commerce, Framework, IT Investment

 

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Journal Article

An Evaluation Framework for the Acceptance of Web‑Based Aptitude Tests  pp151-158

Michael Amberg, Sonja Fischer, Manuela Schröder

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

Aptitude tests analyse the aptitude of persons for studying at a specific school or university as well as for working within a specific company. Due to the recent technology advances, web‑based solutions are increasingly used for the implementation of aptitude tests. These web‑based aptitude tests can be utilised for rather standardized test methods, testing a large amount of users. Based on the fact that web‑based aptitude tests are getting more and more common, a high user acceptance is important, especially since test results tend to be taken more seriously. Furthermore, the design of the test should be helpful and support the use of the test. In this context, the target of our research is to provide a framework for the evaluation of the user acceptance for web‑based aptitude tests. The research method is based on an exemplary web‑based aptitude test and includes the following steps: Firstly, we used the Dynamic Accep‑ tance Model for the Re‑evaluation of Technologies (DART) as a basis for the adoption of web‑based aptitude tests. DART is an instrument designed for the analysis and evaluation of the user acceptance of innovative technologies, prod‑ ucts or services. Based on a literature review and expert interviews, we identified the most important acceptance indica‑ tors. In a next step, we evaluated the defined acceptance indicators in a survey with test persons who carried out one selected web‑based aptitude test. Afterwards, we analysed the reliability and validity of the developed evaluation frame‑ work. The result shows that a detailed analysis of the influencing factors is generally possible with the use of DART. This approach helps to define a balanced set of measurable acceptance indicators for the evaluation of the user acceptance. Finally, we described lessons learned and the ongoing process to measure the acceptance of web‑based aptitude tests.

 

Keywords: evaluation framework, web-based aptitude test, user acceptance, DART approach

 

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Journal Article

A Framework for the Evaluation of Business Models and its Empirical Validation  pp31-43

Jean-Paul Van Belle

© Apr 2006 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 43

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Abstract

This article describes a proposal for a framework to evaluate and compare enterprise models. It suggests three major categories for grouping the model evaluation criteria: syntactic, semantic and pragmatic analysis. The paper draws on a wide literature to present a large selection of criteria and to operationalise their measurement by means of several possible metrics. As an empirical validation test, a selection of metrics for eight of the criteria has been calculated for fifteen large enterprise models. Their interpretation supports the usefulness and validity of the overall framework. Various attempts at deriving a composite overall quality score are discussed, but there is less confidence in the validity of this approach.

 

Keywords: Enterprise modelling, evaluation framework, system analysis metrics

 

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Journal Article

A Holistic Framework on Information Systems Evaluation with a Case Analysis  pp57-64

Petri Hallikainen, Lena Chen

© Nov 2006 Volume 9 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp45 - 104

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Abstract

This paper presents a framework for understanding IS evaluation in its broader context. The role of IS evaluation is emphasised on integrating the IS development process into business development process. The framework is applied to analyze a single IS project in details. The results show that sometimes formal IS evaluation might not be important or necessary, but rather it may be more important, with an informal and flexible evaluation process, to quickly gain experience of a new kind of business and system to maintain a leading position in the competitive market.

 

Keywords: information systems projects, IS evaluation, organisational context, holistic framework on IS evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Towards a Model for Determining the Scope of ICT Integration in the Enterprise: the Case of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems  pp17-26

Fergal Carton, Frederic Adam

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

The question of integration of information systems (IS) into the planning and execution of operational activities has been the focus for researchers from different constituencies. Organisational theorists recognise the need for integrating mechanisms for co‑ordinating the actions of sub‑units within an organisation. Centralisation has been seen as a defensive reaction by organisations when placed under increasing external control , and also as a way to improve the efficiency of information processing, at least for routine tasks. In the meantime, researchers have been sceptical about the ability for structured information systems to deal with the complexity of the information flows within the organisation. Frameworks have also been identifying characteristics of the tasks themselves that have a bearing on the amount of information processing required. The real world is complex and moving, thus managers require flexibility in their interpretation of the mixed signals arising from this complexity. However, managers are working in environments where highly integrated information systems blur the distinction between what is real and what is virtual. There is a need for an integration approach allowing organisations to question which areas of activity are worth integrating, and conversely which areas are better left under local control. Where integrated, managers require processes for the maintenance of data integrity (people, tools, procedures). Based on field work involving two multi‑national manufacturing companies, this paper proposes a framework for ERP integration, which describes the evolution of functionality gaps as an ongoing and inevitable process that requires management.

 

Keywords: ERP, enterprise, integration, framework, complexity

 

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Journal Article

Firms Patterns of e‑Business Adoption: Evidence for the European Union‑27  pp47-56

Tiago Oliveira, Maria Fraga Martins

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

Research has shown that firms using e‑business achieve considerable returns through efficiency improvements, inventory reduction, sales increase, customer relationship enhancement, new market penetration, and ultimately financial returns. However, there is little systematic research in terms of e‑business adoption patterns in firms across countries and industries. This study addresses the research gap by analysing the pattern of e‑business adoption by firms across European Union (EU) members. For that, we used the survey data from 6,964 businesses in EU27 members (excluding Malta and Bulgaria). The choice of variables that we will use in our study is based on the technology‑organization‑environment (TOE) theory. In the TOE framework, three aspects may possibly influence e‑business adoption: technological context (technology readiness and technology integration), organizational context (firm size, expected benefits and barriers of e‑business and improved products or services or internal processes) and environmental context (internet penetration and competitive pressure). We performed a factor analysis (FA) of multi‑item indicators to evaluate the validity and to reduce the number of variables. We used the principal component technique with varimax rotation to extract four eigen‑value, which were all greater than one. The first four factors explain 72.4% of variance contained in the data. The four factors found are: expected benefits and obstacles of e‑business, internet penetration, technology readiness and technology integration. These factors are in accordance with the literature review. Afterwards, we performed a cluster analysis (CA) using variables obtained from the FA and the other variables were gathered directly (firm size, employees education, improved products or services or internal processes and competitive pressure) from the e‑Business W@tch survey. In the CA we used hierarchical and non hierarchical methods. We obtained four distinct groups of e‑business adoption. The pattern of these groups suggested that in the European context the most important factor to characterize e‑business adoption is the specific characteristics of the industry and is not the country to which the firms belong.

 

Keywords: e-business adoption, information and communication technology, ICT, technology-organizational-environment, TOE, framework, cluster analysis, CA, European Union, EU, members

 

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Journal Article

Medical Records System Adoption in European Hospitals  pp89-99

Ana Marques, Tiago Oliveira, Sara Simoes Dias, Maria Fraga O. Martins

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Health Care system has had an ongoing focus on improving access to and quality of care, and more recently on cost reduction. The primary mean to achieve these goals has been to change health care policy, as exemplified by the adoption of health information technology in particular the adoption of patient centred information, characterized by the ability to manage comprehensive patience information such as: medical records; appointments scheduling; theatre management and ward reporting. Different terms are used to refer to these systems including the most common: electronic patient record; electronic medical record; computer based patient record and medical records system (MRS). Despite the importance of these systems in health care, little is known about the adoption. This study addresses the existent research gap by analyzing the adoption of MRS in European hospitals. Study data source is the e‑Business W@tch 2006 decision maker survey, covering 448 hospitals in the European Union. Additional information related to country wealth indicators, was extracted from the EU official statistics and opinion polls website. Variable choice is based on a derivation from the recently introduced framework know as Human, Organization and Technology fit (HOT‑fit) and Technology, Organization and Environment (TOE) framework. Adding the environmental context into the HOT‑fit framework, the Human, Organization, Technology and Environment (HOTE) framework is derivate. HOTE framework identifies four contexts that influence information and communication technologies (ICT) adoption: Technology characteristics including equipment but also processes; Organizational context as size, localization and even managerial structure; Human context relating to ‘User Involvement’; and Environmental context that incorporate the cultural environment of the country and regulatory influence. In order to reduce the number of variables available, a factor analysis (FA) is performed, using the principal component technique with varimax rotation. Three eigen‑value, greater than one are extracted, explaining 69.68% of the variance contained in the data. The three contexts found are: country wealth, competition and technology readiness. To determine the correlation between HOTE framework characteristics and MRS adoption a Logit model is used. For that were used variables obtained from the FA and other variables such as hospital size, education level and research level, gathered directly from the e‑business watch survey. MRS adoption is significantly associated with Education Level, Technology Readiness and Country Wealth. Since MRS adoption may be an organization survival strategy for hospitals to improve quality and efficiency while reducing costs, hospitals that are at risk of missing the wave of implementation should be offered incentives that enable them to implement and maintain patient centred information systems.

 

Keywords: ICT adoption, e-Business, HOTE framework, Hospitals, Factor Analysis, Logit model.

 

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Journal Article

Literature Review of Information Technology Adoption Models at Firm Level  pp110-121

Tiago Oliveira, Maria Fraga Martins

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Today, information technology (IT) is universally regarded as an essential tool in enhancing the competitiveness of the economy of a country. There is consensus that IT has significant effects on the productivity of firms. These effects will only be realized if, and when, IT are widely spread and used. It is essential to understand the determinants of IT adoption. Consequently it is necessary to know the theoretical models. There are few reviews in the literature about the comparison of IT adoption models at the individual level, and to the best of our knowledge there are even fewer at the firm level. This review will fill this gap. In this study, we review theories for adoption models at the firm level used in information systems literature and discuss two prominent models: diffusion on innovation (DOI) theory, and the technology, organization, and environment (TOE) framework. The DOI found that individual characteristics, internal characteristics of organizational structure, and external characteristics of the organization are important antecedents to organizational innovativeness. The TOE framework identifies three aspects of an enterprise's context that influence the process by which it adopts and implements a technological innovation: technological context, organizational context, and environmental context. We made a thorough analysis of the TOE framework, analysing the studies that used only this theory and the studies that combine the TOE framework with other theories such as: DOI, institutional theory, and the Iacovou, Benbasat, and Dexter model. The institutional theory helps us to understand the factors that influence the adoption of interorganizational systems (IOSs); it postulates that mimetic, coercive, and normative institutional pressures existing in an institutionalized environment may influence the organization’s predisposition toward an IT‑based interorganizational system. The Iacovou, Benbasat, and Dexter model, analyses IOSs characteristics that influence firms to adopt IT innovations. It is based on three contexts: perceived benefits, organizational readiness, and external pressure. The analysis of these models takes into account the empirical literature, and the difference between independent and dependent variables. The paper also makes recommendations for future research.

 

Keywords: information technology, diffusion of innovations, DOI, theory, technology-organization-environment, TOE, framework, interorganizational systems, IOSs, institutional theory

 

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