The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
For general enquiries email administrator@ejise.com
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation is available here

linkedin-120 

twitter2-125 

fb_logo-125 

 

Journal Article

Responsibility and Accountability for Information Asset Management (IAM) in Organisations  pp113-121

Nina Evans, James Price

© Jul 2014 Volume 17 Issue 1, Special issue from ECIME 2013, Editor: Prof Przemyslaw Lech, pp1 - 121

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: The key resources that need to be effectively deployed to meet business objectives are Financial Assets, Human Assets, Physical Assets and Information Assets (IA). Information Assets are a critical business resource for most organisations, ye t they are typically poorly managed and the potential, tangible benefits from improving the management of these assets are seldom realised. Business governance refers to the decisions that must be made to ensure effective business management and also to w ho makes these decisions, i.e. who is responsible and accountable. Very little research has been undertaken on the role and responsibilities of various stakeholders in information asset management. This paper reports on qualitative research via confidenti al interviews that were conducted with C‑level executives and Board members of Australian and South African organisations in both private and public sectors, to identify their perceptions of who is responsible and accountable for the management of Informa tion Assets in their organisations. The research found that the information management decisions that must be made, and by whom, is often not clear in these organisations Responsibility and accountability is therefore inappropriately imposed.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Information Assets, IA, governance, Information Asset Management, IAM, responsibility, accountability

 

Share |

Journal Article

When Paradigms Shift: IT Evaluation in a Brave New World  pp21-30

Frank Bannister

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Over the years, there have been many foci in the search for IT value. However impending developments in information and other technologies may be about to change the nature of the quest entirely. For example, the prospect of technologically enhanced biological function raises new, difficult and disturbing questions about value that need to be explored. Longer term, developments areas such as cyborg technology, artificial intelligence and robotics could have profound, and potentially disruptive, implications for societies and even humanity as a whole. As of now, there is a rapidly diminishing window of opportunity in which to get our values and value systems clear before a combination of technological advance and market forces overwhelms our ability to make important value choices. This paper explores some of the possibilities that may be coming our way and asks some difficult questions about IT value in what may be a brave new world.

 

Keywords: IT value, emerging technology, artificial intelligence, robotics, cyborgs, nanotechnology, discontinuity

 

Share |

Journal Article

Performance Evaluation of e‑Business in Australia  pp71-80

Mohini Singh, John Byrne

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The Internet and related technologies have made a substantial impact on the way organisations conduct business in Australia and around the world. Australian organisations like their international counterparts have invested heavily to leverage the Internet and transform their traditional businesses into e‑businesses in the last seven years. E‑business investments are claiming a sizeable share of overall IT budgets in most organisations whether they are small, medium or large. However, managers are under constant pressure to justify e‑business costs and to ensure that these investments keep paying off. Earlier research on e‑business in Australia addressed issues of the rate of e‑business uptake and the application of the Internet to certain business processes. Research discussed in this paper is one of the first attempts to evaluate the value of e‑business. It is based on data collected, collated and analysed from the responses received from IT and e‑business managers throughout Australia. Research presented in this paper is based on a model developed in the USA (Barua et al, 2001) to identify the impact of e‑business drivers on operational excellence of firms which influence financial improvements. It was initiated to quantify the success of e‑business in Australia after huge losses from e‑business projects were reported by a few large organisations. The paper includes a review of literature on e‑business evaluation, research methodology, analysis techniques, a discussion of e‑business performance in Australia and presents the impact of e‑business on operational excellence and financial performance of the organisation.

 

Keywords: e-business evaluation, B2B e-business, B2C e-business, e-business drivers, e-business operational improvements, e-business financial success

 

Share |

Journal Article

Towards an Integrated Approach to Benefits Realisation Management — Reflections from the Development of a Clinical Trials Support System  pp83-90

Neil Doherty, Nilesh Dudhal, Crispin Coombs, Ron Summers, Hiten Vyas, Mark Hepworth, Elisabeth Kettle

© Jun 2008 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp51 - 108

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The aim of our research project, described in this paper, was to develop a purpose‑built clinical trials support system [CTSS], which would be sufficiently comprehensive, integrated and flexible, so as to support the vast majority of research studies that were to be managed and conducted by one UK‑based health authority. Whilst at the start of this project, it was reasonably clear what major clinical activities the system would need to be able to support, it was less clear what benefits the system should be expected to deliver, nor how these benefits were related to specific aspects of the system's functionality. Moreover, whilst it was recognised that the introduction of the CTSS would engender fairly significant organisational changes, it was less easy to articulate the nature of the changes, nor how they might ultimately relate to the realisation of benefits. Consequently, it was agreed at the project's outset that an explicit benefits' realisation approach should be integrated into the system's development activity. The aims of this paper are threefold: 1] to describe the CTSS project, paying particular attention to why it justified the inclusion of a benefits realisation approach; 2] to provide a description of, and justification for, the benefits management approach adopted; 3] to provide a provisional assessment of the effectiveness of this approach. In addressing these objectives, it was envisaged that our paper would make an important contribution to the literature by providing one of the few first‑hand accounts of the conduct of benefits' management practices, and certainly the first in the context of clinical trials support systems. Moreover, the paper provides new insights into the integration of benefits realisation and structured development tools and practices: we describe how the benefits dependency network has been successfully related to use case diagrams.

 

Keywords: Benefits realisation, Software development, Clinical trials, NHS

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM): an Alternative View to Information Systems Project Measurement  pp185-200

Corlane Barclay, Kweku-Muata Osei-Bryson

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The information systems (IS) project management profession has been faced with numerous socio‑technical challenges. As part of its analysis, research has expressed discontent with the traditional measures used to assess the success or failure of these projects, i.e. conformance to time, schedule and specification requirements espoused by the project management (PM) standard bodies. Despite this, research has also revealed that industry continues to place high reliance on this approach in determining the outcome of their projects. These developments imply, in part, a misalignment between research and practice and a scarcity of appropriate measurement tools that are aligned to the realities of different project contexts. The research presents a Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM) that attempts to address some of these concerns through the development of project measures that are aligned to key project stakeholders' values and objectives within the unique project contexts. It is argued that objectives are the key performance criteria of the project hence measures must be aligned to these criteria and formal procedures should be in place to assure that these objectives and measures are carefully developed and reflective of the persons to which the project matters, the stakeholders. The POMM is grounded on several principles of the Value Focused Thinking (VFT) and Goal Question Metric (GQM) techniques. The evaluation of the proposed model was performed in two parts: a team of industry experts examined the principles of model and provided feedback on its practicability to practice, and a case study of a Caribbean educational institution's IS graduate programme development was used to illustrate the procedures of the model. The research provides theoretical and practical implications for IS evaluation particularly within the project management and performance measurement domains. The research aims to extend the debate on suitable evaluation methods for IS projects while providing project practitioners with an alternative approach that can enhance their decision making processes during the life of the project.

 

Keywords: IS project, project objectives measurement model, POMM, success criteria, IS project management, Caribbean

 

Share |

Journal Article

ICT Evaluation in the Irish Higher Education Sector  pp187-198

Marian Carcary

© Feb 2010 Volume 12 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp129 - 198

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The Information and Communications Technology (ICT) evaluation literature now spans several decades. Nonetheless, evidence continues to suggest that there remains a lack of formal ICT evaluation practices within organisations. Several challenges exist, not least the social and political contexts within which evaluation takes place and limitations in existing evaluation techniques. However, while ICT evaluation exercises have spanned many fields of study, an in‑depth review of the ICT evaluation literature revealed that there is a paucity of ICT evaluation studies within the Higher Education sector. The 14 Irish Institutes of Technology (IoTs) have recently undergone an extensive transformation of their ICT systems. A national project launched by the Department of Education and Science and the Council of Directors of the IoTs performed a nationwide implementation of a suite of integrated Information Systems for library, human resources, finance and student management functions in order to standardise the ICT systems of the IoT sector. Yet, at the time of research, no formal evaluation of this project had been completed. This paper advances the body of ICT evaluation knowledge in the tertiary education sector through evaluating the impact of the Student MIS implementation within the IoTs. The research study was interpretive in nature; case studies based on multiple evidence sources were conducted in five IoTs. Analysis of the evidence led to the distillation of 15 findings on the Student MIS implementation which were centred on five key project areas – system selection, system development in the Irish IoTs, system commissioning, ex‑post performance at system start‑up and at the time of research. The 15 findings uncovered either support existing research in the ICT evaluation field or further advance the body of ICT evaluation theoretical knowledge. This paper makes a number of valuable contributions. It enhances understanding of ICT evaluation in tertiary education. It discusses the difficulties involved in operationalising a standard ICT system in multiple diverse organisations and provides lessons with respect to managing the difficulties experienced in large‑scale government projects.

 

Keywords: ICT investment management, ICT evaluation, ex-post evaluation, MIS, ICT in tertiary education

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Dilution of Effort in Self‑Evaluating Development Teams: Agile Loafing  pp175-186

John McAvoy, Tom Butler

© Feb 2010 Volume 12 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp129 - 198

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Attempts to resolve the problems in software development have concentrated on the tools and methodologies used, despite an acceptance by many that it is a sociological problem. An example of this is the procedures and processes surrounding evaluations within projects, yet ultimately it depends on individuals more than process. This paper examines one of the sociological factors inherent in a software development team to determine its impact on evaluation within a project. Social loafing occurs where individual members of a team demonstrate a tendency not to work as hard as they could or should. This "slacking off" occurs because the team provides a degree of anonymity – the individual feels their lack of work will be hidden from evaluation within the overall output of the team. Some authors purport that Agile Software development teams have low incidences of social loafing (though these are opinions rather than research findings); the contrary can also be argued. An examination of the philosophy behind Agile Software Development, demonstrated by the Agile Manifesto, highlighted the possibility of occurrences of social loafing brought about by the Agile values. Agile espouses the importance of cohesive teams, the empowerment of these teams, and the collective ownership and self‑ evaluation of work by the team. These values map onto factors which are described as affecting social loafing. An investigation of two teams over an eight month period examined if the Agile values could lead to incidences of social loafing, specifically when their work is being evaluated The investigation determined that the opposite was actually the case. This paper then goes on to determine why the findings go against the initial hypothesis and to show the impact this can have on those evaluating software development projects.

 

Keywords: teams, agile software development, social loafing, self-evaluation, participant observation, sociological factors

 

Share |

Journal Article

Is a Multi‑Criteria Evaluation Tool Reserved for Experts?  pp151-162

C. Sanga, I. M Venter

© Feb 2010 Volume 12 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp129 - 198

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The objective of this investigation was to determine whether the analytical hierarchy process algorithm is suitable for the evaluation of software by evaluators with little Information Technology experience. The scope of the research was the evaluation of two free and open source e‑learning systems at the Open University of Tanzania using 33 stakeholders with diverse levels of Information Technology experience. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were used. The qualitative methods comprised participative observation and interviews. Questionnaires and the analytical hierarchy process, a multiple‑criteria decision‑ making algorithm, represented the quantitative methods. The results showed that of the two e‑learning systems evaluated, Moodle was preferred over ATutor. Furthermore it was found that the analytical hierarchy process algorithm is appropriate for the evaluation of software in a situation where Information Technology experience is limited. It is anticipated that the paper contributes to the theory and practise of decision making in developing countries such as Tanzania.

 

Keywords: free and open source software, e-learning systems, software quality, multi-criteria evaluation tool, analytical hierarchy process, novice user, developing country

 

Share |