The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
For general enquiries email administrator@ejise.com
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation is available here

linkedin-120 

twitter2-125 

fb_logo-125 

 

Journal Article

IT Evaluation Frameworks — Do They Make a Valuable Contribution? A Critique of Some of the Classic Models for use by SMEs  pp57-64

Pat Costello, Andy Sloane, Rob Moreton

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Given the plethora of frameworks and models available in this area, not all could be evaluated here. This paper takes seven popular frameworks and examines aspects of IT evaluation with particular emphasis on Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs). The frameworks were selected from the most well known of IT evaluation research including Delone and McLean, 1992, Seddon et.al. 1999, Farbey et.al, 1999, Levy et.al., 1998. Most of the frameworks were developed for large organisations and therefore those chosen were evaluated for their applicability to the world of SMEs. These are categorised into four areas: people issues, technology focus, evolutionary position and management aspects. The conclusion is reached that the use of a multi‑framework is needed for all organisations. This presents severe difficulties in larger organisations, as the problems of communications can be a stumbling block to completing the evaluation. However, this paper proposes that SMEs may find it easier to take parts of 'tested' frameworks used by larger companies and apply them. The communication links within SMEs are neither as complex nor as highly developed as in large organisations that may make this an appropriate approach.

 

Keywords: IT evaluation, IT Value, SMEs, frameworks, models

 

Share |

Journal Article

Proposal of a Compact IT Value Assessment Method  pp73-82

Przemyslaw Lech

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper contains a proposal of a compact IT value assessment method. It follows the assumption that most methods available for the public are either described in a very general manner or concentrate on one of the evaluation aspects only. The proposed method relates the evaluation approach to the main IT initiative characteristics, such as the investment purpose and IT element to be implemented. Based on these criteria, the evaluation process is shaped by putting emphasis on the relevant evaluation aspects and choosing the relevant evaluation methods. The method design is focused on the ease of use and practical relevance so it can be used by IT practitioners to assess IT initiatives in their organisations. The paper finishes with the case study of the method usage in a mid‑sized production enterprise.

 

Keywords: IT value assessment, IT evaluation, practical method, case study

 

Share |

Journal Article

Critical Organizational Challenges in Delivering Business Value from IT: In Search of Hybrid IT Value Models  pp130-146

Nazareth Nicolian, Christine Welch, Martin Read, Martyn Roberts

© Sep 2015 Volume 18 Issue 2, The special issue from ECIME 2014, Editor: Jan Devos, pp93 - 210

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: This study forms part of a larger research project to explore and analyze the perceived value of IT and the organizational competencies needed to deliver that value. By identifying and evaluating the challenges faced by Lebanese organizations, t his paper provides empirical evidence in support of hybrid models of IT value. While process‑based IT value models provide an explanation for howŽ IT value is created, and what steps occur to create that outcome, they lack the contingency theory found in variance models, which explain whyŽ IT value is realized, and what variable moderate that outcome. On the other hand, variance models alone are also ill‑equipped to explain the greater scope and impacts of IT investments. Hybrid models combine both proc ess and variance perspectives to provide a more comprehensive theory of IT value realization. Structured interviews are conducted with the Chief Information Officers (CIO) of 36 medium and large size Lebanese organizations to discover the challenges fa ced in delivering value from IT investments. Of the 14 challenges discovered, seven point to the need for process orientated competencies and these include Change ManagementŽ, Organizational ReadinessŽ, Relationship ManagementŽ, Benefits ManagementŽ, IT GovernanceŽ, IT Architecture ManagementŽ, and IT Talent ManagementŽ. The other seven challenges are variance oriented and point to the factors that inhibit or enable deriving IT value, and these include internal factors, such as: Family Business O wnershipŽ, and Budgetary ConstraintsŽ, and other external factors, such as: Political/Social/Economic InstabilityŽ, Telecommunications/Bandwidth IssuesŽ, Lack of Governmental IT LawsŽ, Local Cultural IssuesŽ, and Immature Local Suppliers/VendorsŽ. R ather than continuing an already‑saturated research conversation about the dependent variable, IT ValueŽ and whether IT creates business value, this study contributes to the independent variable research stream ‑ the investigation of how to derive value from IT, and when and under which conditionsŽ value is realized, and for conceiving a Hybrid model explaining the IT value proposition.

 

Keywords: Keywords: IT value Models, Organizational IT competencies and IT challenges, ERP CSFs, CIO

 

Share |

Journal Article

When Paradigms Shift: IT Evaluation in a Brave New World  pp21-30

Frank Bannister

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Over the years, there have been many foci in the search for IT value. However impending developments in information and other technologies may be about to change the nature of the quest entirely. For example, the prospect of technologically enhanced biological function raises new, difficult and disturbing questions about value that need to be explored. Longer term, developments areas such as cyborg technology, artificial intelligence and robotics could have profound, and potentially disruptive, implications for societies and even humanity as a whole. As of now, there is a rapidly diminishing window of opportunity in which to get our values and value systems clear before a combination of technological advance and market forces overwhelms our ability to make important value choices. This paper explores some of the possibilities that may be coming our way and asks some difficult questions about IT value in what may be a brave new world.

 

Keywords: IT value, emerging technology, artificial intelligence, robotics, cyborgs, nanotechnology, discontinuity

 

Share |

Journal Article

Why IT Continues to Matter: Reflections on the Strategic Value of IT  pp159-168

Frank Bannister, Dan Remenyi

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

In May 2003 an article by the former editor of the Harvard Business Review (HBR), Nicholas Carr, in HBR, suggested that IT was no longer a strategic concern for management and that investments in IT should, in future, be restricted to the routine. Carr's thesis has been widely debated, not least in the context of IT value in general and its strategic value in particular. Notwithstanding flaws in his reasoning, this short nine‑page article appears to have had a significant impact and influence on the way chief executives think about IT, and has had real consequences for IT budg‑ ets, not to mention careers. Carr went on to develop his ideas in a subsequent book. This article examines Carr's argu‑ ments at a number of levels and suggests that it would be unwise to base long‑term thinking about IT on his conclusions.

 

Keywords: IT value, strategic value, technology value, strategy, innovation

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special / Nov 2005  pp143‑230

Editor: Dan Remenyi

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: IS integration, Mergers, Acquisitions, M&A, Success, IS evaluation, Evaluation framework, Web-based aptitude test, User acceptance, DART approach, IT value, Strategic value, Technology value, Strategy, Innovation, Failure-prone decision process, IS business value, IS evaluation project, Citizen-centric, Patient-oriented, XML web services, Healthcare management, Hub and spoke, Collaborative health, Evaluation, e-Prescription, Interdisciplinary research, Software process innovations, Organisation learning, Adoption, Individual learning styles, Computer capital, Complementary effects, Productivity, Software, Productive efficiency, Perfomance metrics, Balanced scorecard, Causality, Performance manager, Accounting, ERP implementation, IT investments, Business value, Investment quality

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special / Jan 2007  pp1‑122

Editor: Dan Remenyi

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Editorial

Another edition of EJISE brings to the attention of the information systems community 10 more pieces of research into how information systems may be evaluated. The contributions in this issue are from 9 different countries and from a diverse range of universities and business schools.

When I first became actively interested in information systems’ evaluation in 1990 I had no idea of how wide and how deep an issue information systems evaluation was. I had thought that it was worth a few papers and maybe a book or two. Today my view is entirely different and I wonder if the community of information systems academics and practitioners will ever reach a point where by there will be a general agreement as to how to evaluate or assess information systems. My best guess would be that they probably will not.

However as it was put to me at the start of my university studies academics tend to have far more questions than answers and this may not necessarily be a ‘bad’ thing. If we continue to ask the right questions, even if we can’t find definitive answers we are effectively moving the frontier of knowledge forward. And that I suggest is, in the end, the most important objective of academe.

I hope that you will find a number of interesting topics among these 10 papers.

 

Keywords: IS integration, auditing, balanced score card, business process facilitation, case study, confidentiality, domain specific languages, e-Government project evaluation, enterprise information system, CEO framework, ex post evaluation, functional-operational match, ICT benefits, ICT evaluation, ICT project, information economics, Information System Architecture , IS outsourcing , IT evaluation, IT value assessment, knowledge management, meta-modelling tools, motivational factors, user satisfaction surveys, web content management, WLAN

 

Share |