The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Post‑Implementation Evaluation of Collaborative Technology: a Case Study in Business Education  pp77-86

Andriani Piki

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

To be successful in their future careers students need to develop diverse skills and qualifications. Firstly, in addition to understanding the course content and the underlying theories, students need to explore the implications that emerge from their practical application and develop their critical thinking and analytical skills. Secondly, students need to gain experience and confidence in working effectively within multidisciplinary and multicultural groups that mirror the situation they are likely to face in their future work environment. Thirdly, they need to familiarise themselves with collaborative technologies (CTs) since these are increasingly used in the workplace to facilitate communication and collaboration between distant co‑workers. To address these learning needs it is essential to incorporate CTs (such as videoconferencing systems) in the curriculum and provide well‑organized opportunities for students to gain hands‑on experience. Nevertheless, what technologies are used does not make the difference between motivated and unmotivated students; it is how these technologies are used that matters. Whilst innovative technologies can be fascinating, they must be properly evaluated and adjusted to specific educational, individual, and group needs in order to be successfully adopted by students. This evaluation entails taking into consideration the context within which the technology will be used (appropriateness evaluation) and the social‑psychological motives for user acceptance (evaluation of user satisfaction). This paper reports the findings from an interpretive case study in postgraduate business education where students were using a state‑of‑the‑art videoconferencing system as part of their workshops and group discussion sessions. This setting provided a suitable social milieu for post‑implementation evaluation of this collaborative technology. Qualitative methods were employed including participant observation, focus groups, and analysis of videoconferencing sessions captured on video. The findings indicate that computer‑supported collaborative learning (CSCL) helps students become confident with using CTs, learn best practices for communicating and collaborating effectively in technology‑mediated settings, and appreciate the impact that technology has on everyday social endeavours. The videoconferencing exercises also engaged students to actively participate in the learning process. Given the duality of technology presence (in educational and business contexts alike) the findings can inform the design of new pedagogical models that maximize the learning potential of CTs.

 

Keywords: computer-supported collaborative learning, CSCL, videoconferencing, collaborative technology, CT, business education, post-implementation evaluation, video-ethnography, case study

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating Enterprise Systems Implementation Methodologies in Action: Focusing Formalised and Situational Aspects  pp83-90

Daniela Mihailescu, Sven A. Carlsson, Marius Mihailescu

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Enterprise Systems (ES) are often the largest and most important Information Systems (IS) an organisation employs. Most ES are rented or bought as COTS (Commercial Off The Shelf) software. The use of COTS leads to a distinction between the development of the ES software—done by ES software providers, like SAP and Microsoft—and the implementation of ES software in a specific organisation. Implementation of ES are often associated with problems like higher implementation cost and longer implementation process than anticipated. To improve ES implementation, ES providers increasingly support their ES software by, in part computer‑based, implementation methodologies. The paper present an ES implementation evaluation framework called ES Implementation Methodology‑in‑Action. The framework integrates two complementary views: 1) a technology view, focusing on the formalised aspects as expressed in the ES implementation methodology (the content of the methodology), and 2) a structural view, focusing situational aspects as expressed by the implementers (the users of the implementation methodology) including implementers, implementation context, ES software and other individuals participating in the implementation project. Using document studies and interviews with implementers we show how the framework can be used to evaluate ES implementation methodologies. We evaluate one well‑known ES implementation methodology: SAP's ASAP.

 

Keywords: Enterprise Systems Implementation Methodology, Evaluation Framework, Implementation Methodology in Action, Methodology Evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Barriers to the Adoption and Use of an Electronic Medication Record  pp218-229

Maren Sander Granlien, Morten Hertzum

© Jul 2012 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp149 - 229

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Abstract

Clinicians adoption of the information systems deployed at hospitals is crucial to achieving the intended effects of the systems, yet many systems face substantial adoption barriers. In this study we analyse the adoption and use of an electronic medicati on record (EMR) 2‑4 years after its deployment. We investigate mid‑and‑lower‑level managers perception of (a) the extent to which clinicians have adopted the EMR and the work procedures associated with its use and (b) possible barriers toward adopt ing the EMR and work procedures, including the managers perception of the usefulness and ease of use of the EMR. The investigation consists of a questionnaire survey sent to the EMR managers in one Danish healthcare region, followed up with interviews at two hospital wards. The EMR is generally perceived as useful, yet respondents state that adoption of the EMR and related procedures is far from obtained. Eleven categories of barrier are identified with uncertainty about what the barriers concretely are as the prime barrier. This prime barrier is particularly noteworthy because the respondents are formally responsible for the adoption of the EMR. It is apparent that time alone has not led to consistent adoption of the EMR. We discuss implications of this finding for the organizational implementation of systems such as the EMR.

 

Keywords: adoption, technology acceptance, adoption barriers, organizational implementation, electronic medication record, healthcare IT.

 

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Journal Article

The Conditions of Complex Innovation Adoption Occurrence „ A Critical Realist Perspective  pp220-230

Marius Mihailescu, Daniela Mihailescu, Sven Carlsson

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: The adoption of innovation is a multifaceted and dynamic phenomenon. It occurs as a result of the interplay between structural influences and agents activities. Although existing studies on innovation have recognised the importance of theories that link the structure, the macro level, and agency, the micro level, in explaining changes over time, few theoretical accounts support the integrations of multiple levels of analysis. The purpose of this paper is to develop an explanatory framework base d on a realist social theory and underpinned by a critical realist perspective, with the intention of describing and explaining IS/IT adoption occurrences. The potential of the framework is empirically illustrated with a case study that examines the adopt ion of one Enterprise Systems Implementation Methodology by implementers in an implementation context. Our qualitative study provides explanatory insights and a rich description of a particular type of complex innovation. Four theoretically and empiricall y grounded modes of adopting an implementation methodology are identified: fragmented, aggregated, integrated and infrastructural. Using the framework allow us to achieve four things. First, the framework will support the researchers in identifying partic ular configurations and the pattern of events caused by them. Second, it will take into account the embeddedness of innovations that have occurred within broader structural configurations. Third, it will allow the researchers to distinguish the different stances agents might adopt toward particular innovations and structural configurations. Fourth, the researchers will be able to identify variations that have occurred in the adoption of innovations. This study offers a foundation for future work that may contribute to a more coherent view on complex innovations and insights into their potential adoption; as such, the findings presented here can provide guidance for practitioners who seek to adopt complex IS/IT innovations.

 

Keywords: Keywords: IS/IT adoption occurrence, enterprise systems implementation methodology, realist social theory, critical realism, morphogenetic approach, modes of reflexivity

 

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Journal Article

Enterprise System Implementation from the Functional Consultants’ Perspective  pp36-46

Przemysław Lech

© Jul 2014 Volume 17 Issue 1, Special issue from ECIME 2013, Editor: Prof Przemyslaw Lech, pp1 - 121

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Abstract

Abstract: Although Enterprise System (ES) implementation (formerly Enterprise Resource Planning systems) literature is extremely broad, most of it takes the perspective of the implementing organisation and its employees, i.e., project managers, key users and users. The fact that it is both possible and popular to conduct such a complicated, time‑consuming and expensive project using functional consultants is largely omitted. This study explores the Enterprise System implementation project from the perspective of the functional consultants and is based on the analysis of project documentation and interviews. The research questions answered by this study include the consultants’ requirements from other project participants, which help them to accomplish the goals of each project phase, to complete the activities performed in each project phase, and to deliver the products that are requested of them.

 

Keywords: Keywords: enterprise systems, ERP, implementation, project, consultants

 

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Journal Article

Critical Success Factors in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System Implementation: An Exploratory Study in Oman  pp36-45

Ahmad Saleh Shatat

© Jul 2015 Volume 18 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

Abstract: The ERP system has been the subject of much academic discussion in recent times. The impact that a successful implementation can have on an organization cannot be overstated. The factors which are crucial to the successful implementation of an E RP system are commonly known as Critical Success Factors (hereinafter CSFs). This study investigated the CSFs that play a crucial role during the implementation process in Omani organizations. Moreover, it identified the CSFs that are most important in ensuring a successful ERP system implementation. The survey was distributed to 35 enterprises using an ERP system. The managers of those enterprises identified 10 CSFs as the most important.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Critical Success Factors, ERP, Implementation, Oman

 

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Journal Article

Implementing Business Analytics within the Supply Chain: Success and Fault Factors  pp112-120

Douglas Hawley

© May 2016 Volume 19 Issue 2, ECIME 2015, Editor: Elias Pimenidis, pp83 - 134

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Abstract

Abstract: Implementing business analytics across a large company is more about understanding that organization⠒s culture, than it is about the actual technology. Understanding an organization⠒s motivation, advantages and roadblocks is imperative for s uccessful implementation and benefit. This research examines both the critical success factors along with the implementation faults of the largest steel producer in North America, and discusses how these cultural factors play out on a large scale during a n ERP implementation. First, this research identifies general critical success factors as business plan and vision; change management; communication; ERP team composition, skills and compensation; project management; top management support and championshi p; and system analysis, selection and technical implementation (Hoon Na and Delgado 2006). Then, general implementation faults are identified as operational problems, motivational problems, knowledge problems and regulatory problems (Mayntz 1997 in Nie haves, Klose, Becker 2006). These theories are applied to the specific case of Nucor Steel. Application is contextualized through a historical perspective, identifying a low‑cost business model, and enormous divisional autonomy as hindrances to the imple mentation of a common, shared ERP. A timeline of business analytics at the company is given, beginning in 2002, at which point a culture shift occurred though the acquisition of a major competitor. Divisional autonomy at this time, began to be challenged, leading to easier integration of reporting systems and cross‑company data analysis. Then, details are provided as to how this company is making a case for a new, innovative, business model and how it is developing needed expertise in the area of business analytics. Changes in the steel business are requiring companies to move from a low‑cost model to a value‑added model increasing the need for innovation in all areas of the company. These innovations inevitably require the use of more complex data analyt ics that cut across the entire company, instead

 

Keywords: Keywords: success factors, implementation faults, business analytics, enterprise resource planning, ERP, historical considerations

 

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Journal Article

Impact of the Quality of ERP Implementations on Business Value  pp221-230

Oana Velcu

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

This study compares the financial performance trend of successful and less successful ERP implementers over three years following the implementation. The findings indicate no significant difference in the change in ROA and ROI of the two groups of adopters. Successful ERP adopters however have statistically significant higher efficiency benefits in terms of Asset Turnover and Capital Turnover than the less successful ERP adopters in the first two years after implementation. The findings of this paper reveal no significant contribution of the implementation effort to the suc‑ cess of ERP implementations.

 

Keywords: ERP implementations, IT investments, Business value, Investment quality

 

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