The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Adoption in the South African Retail Sector: an Investigation of Perceptions Held by Members of the Retail Sector Regarding the Adoption Constraints  pp87-96

Chris Upfold, Haidi Liu

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology is a method of identifying unique items using radio waves that communicate between RFID tags and readers without line‑of‑sight readability. Application areas include person identification, logistics, pharmaceutical, access control, security guard monitoring and asset management. One of the areas where RFID promises excellent potential is in the retail industry for the tracking of goods and products throughout the supply chain. There are concerns around numerous RFID adoption barriers. Decision makers in the South African retail sector seem to be adopting a wait‑and‑see approach. In an attempt to identify and explore these barriers, a literature review was conducted identifying 29 unique barriers to RFID adoption. A survey instrument, informed by these barriers, was constructed and administered to members of the retail sector in South Africa. The research reveals that the South African retail sector is aware of the benefits in adopting RFID technology, however, they have identified numerous adoption barriers that will need mitigation before they will commit to adopting RFID. The research confirms six main categories with several adoption barriers in each, needing to be addressed. The main categories include, RFID skills shortage, a lack of standardization, high costs of RFID devices, the difficulty of integrating with current legacy systems and a lack of familiarity with RFID systems.

 

Keywords: RFID, diffusion of innovation, adoption barriers, business case, supply chain management

 

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Journal Article

A Framework for Enhancing the Information Systems Innovation: Using Competitive Intelligence  pp242-253

Phathutshedzo Nemutanzhela, Tiko Iyamu

© Sep 2011 Volume 14 Issue 2, ICIME 2011, Editor: Ken Grant, pp167 - 281

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Abstract

Knowledge is used as a focal factor for competitive advantage, through effective and efficient performances by employees in many organisations. As a result, knowledgeable employees are expected to share their knowledge with others to increase innovation within the organisation. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Generally, employees behave differently within an organisation. The main challenge is that no organisation has total control of its employees behaviour and actions. The behaviour and action has impact on how information systems are deployed for innovation, in creating competitive advantage. As a result, many systems have been deployed by different organisations in attempt to address this challenge for the interest. Others have deployed competitive intelligence products and services. This is primarily intended to provide decision ‑ makers with information that can contribute to the innovative process in order to meet customer needs. For an organisation to survive, it must be able to innovate and market its innovations. Also, innovation creates uncertainty about its consequences in the mind of potential adopters. There exists a discrepancy between what customers perceive as their problems or needs and what organisations understand these problems to be. This study was conducted with the primary aim to understand the impact of Competitive Intelligence (CI) on Information systems (IS) innovation products and services in organisations. The case study research method was employed, using a financial organisation. The Innovation‑decision process, from the perspective of Diffusion of Innovation theory (DOI) was applied in the data analysis.

 

Keywords: competitive intelligence, CI, diffusion of innovation, DoI, Information systems, IS, innovation

 

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Journal Article

Editorial  pp1-2

Shaun Pather Editorial

© Mar 2016 Volume 19 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

Abstract: The issue of businesses understanding cloud adoptionŽ exists, despite the diverse academic research on cloud adoption. The various approaches (business and technical), theories (Technology‑Organization‑Environment, Transaction cost theory, R esource based view) have resulted in a fragmented and piece‑meal approach to understanding cloud adoption. The purpose of this article is to review and consolidate the diverse literature on cloud adoption. This can help organizations decide their cloud r eadiness and understand the business implications from multiple perspectives. The paper begins with a focused review of existing literature on cloud adoption. The articles in the literature are then systematically classified on various parameters such as the perspective used (business versus technical), the dominant theory used and the adoption factors that are identified. Two existing frameworks are also critiqued to highlight their strengths and limitations. Finally, a short check list based on the c umulative findings is prepared. The review reveals common themes in terms of examining cloud adoption. It shows that cloud adoption has been primarily examined from the innovative technology perspective using the Technology‑Organization‑Environment framew ork. The two other dominant approaches that come up include the economic/cost perspective driven by transaction cost theory and the use of multi‑criteria decision framework. The article contributes by reviewing and consolidating the diverse literature on the topic of cloud adoption. The study organizes the recurrent themes in the reviewed articles in terms four important areas. Within each area, the study also provides some commonly asked questions that could help organizations understand their readiness to adopt cloud. This way, the article integrates different perspectives and provides organizations with a simple, holistic check list to examine business implications of moving to cloud.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Cloud computing, technology adoption, diffusion of innovation, technology-organization-environment, transaction cost theory, cloud readiness

 

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Journal Article

Cloud Adoption Decisions: Benefitting from an Integrated Perspective  pp3-21

Deepa Ray

© Mar 2016 Volume 19 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

Abstract: The issue of businesses understanding cloud adoptionŽ exists, despite the diverse academic research on cloud adoption. The various approaches (business and technical), theories (Technology‑Organization‑Environment, Transaction cost theory, R esource based view) have resulted in a fragmented and piece‑meal approach to understanding cloud adoption. The purpose of this article is to review and consolidate the diverse literature on cloud adoption. This can help organizations decide their cloud r eadiness and understand the business implications from multiple perspectives. The paper begins with a focused review of existing literature on cloud adoption. The articles in the literature are then systematically classified on various parameters such as the perspective used (business versus technical), the dominant theory used and the adoption factors that are identified. Two existing frameworks are also critiqued to highlight their strengths and limitations. Finally, a short check list based on the c umulative findings is prepared. The review reveals common themes in terms of examining cloud adoption. It shows that cloud adoption has been primarily examined from the innovative technology perspective using the Technology‑Organization‑Environment framew ork. The two other dominant approaches that come up include the economic/cost perspective driven by transaction cost theory and the use of multi‑criteria decision framework. The article contributes by reviewing and consolidating the diverse literature on the topic of cloud adoption. The study organizes the recurrent themes in the reviewed articles in terms four important areas. Within each area, the study also provides some commonly asked questions that could help organizations understand their readiness to adopt cloud. This way, the article integrates different perspectives and provides organizations with a simple, holistic check list to examine business implications of moving to cloud.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Cloud computing, technology adoption, diffusion of innovation, technology-organization-environment, transaction cost theory, cloud readiness

 

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Journal Article

Why IT Continues to Matter: Reflections on the Strategic Value of IT  pp159-168

Frank Bannister, Dan Remenyi

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

In May 2003 an article by the former editor of the Harvard Business Review (HBR), Nicholas Carr, in HBR, suggested that IT was no longer a strategic concern for management and that investments in IT should, in future, be restricted to the routine. Carr's thesis has been widely debated, not least in the context of IT value in general and its strategic value in particular. Notwithstanding flaws in his reasoning, this short nine‑page article appears to have had a significant impact and influence on the way chief executives think about IT, and has had real consequences for IT budg‑ ets, not to mention careers. Carr went on to develop his ideas in a subsequent book. This article examines Carr's argu‑ ments at a number of levels and suggests that it would be unwise to base long‑term thinking about IT on his conclusions.

 

Keywords: IT value, strategic value, technology value, strategy, innovation

 

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Journal Article

The Adoption of new Application Development Tools by IT Pro‑fessionals from the Viewpoint of Organisational Learning  pp197-206

Torsti Rantapuska

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

Productivity and innovativeness of information work is becoming an important issue among information work‑ers. This paper explores the working and learning of IS professionals when adopting new application development tools. I study how the IS professionals work, communicate, think through problems, and learn by way of getting work done. I also analyse the changes that the adoption causes to the individual style of working. The research questions are formu‑ lated as follows: 1) what contributes to the effective use of IT tools? 2) How does the adoption of new tools affect the individual working methods? The research is based on interviews of fourteen young professionals who have recently started using a new application development tool. The interviews have been conducted in their working places. The fo‑ cus is on learning at work. Special attention is paid to the initial motivation of the innovation, to knowledge acquisition, and to communication with their team members during the problem solving process. According to the findings, the IS professionals' working style is personal and context‑oriented. As learners they do not interact with their peers and do not use systematic working methods too much. The Internet and help systems are used as the basis of group interaction and source of knowledge more likely than colleagues and textbooks. The systematic orientation of working practice is limited to the context at hand. At the end of the study, the results are discussed and recommendations are proposed to improve the software process.

 

Keywords: software process innovations, organisational learning, adoption, individual learning styles

 

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Journal Article

Literature Review of Information Technology Adoption Models at Firm Level  pp110-121

Tiago Oliveira, Maria Fraga Martins

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Today, information technology (IT) is universally regarded as an essential tool in enhancing the competitiveness of the economy of a country. There is consensus that IT has significant effects on the productivity of firms. These effects will only be realized if, and when, IT are widely spread and used. It is essential to understand the determinants of IT adoption. Consequently it is necessary to know the theoretical models. There are few reviews in the literature about the comparison of IT adoption models at the individual level, and to the best of our knowledge there are even fewer at the firm level. This review will fill this gap. In this study, we review theories for adoption models at the firm level used in information systems literature and discuss two prominent models: diffusion on innovation (DOI) theory, and the technology, organization, and environment (TOE) framework. The DOI found that individual characteristics, internal characteristics of organizational structure, and external characteristics of the organization are important antecedents to organizational innovativeness. The TOE framework identifies three aspects of an enterprise's context that influence the process by which it adopts and implements a technological innovation: technological context, organizational context, and environmental context. We made a thorough analysis of the TOE framework, analysing the studies that used only this theory and the studies that combine the TOE framework with other theories such as: DOI, institutional theory, and the Iacovou, Benbasat, and Dexter model. The institutional theory helps us to understand the factors that influence the adoption of interorganizational systems (IOSs); it postulates that mimetic, coercive, and normative institutional pressures existing in an institutionalized environment may influence the organization’s predisposition toward an IT‑based interorganizational system. The Iacovou, Benbasat, and Dexter model, analyses IOSs characteristics that influence firms to adopt IT innovations. It is based on three contexts: perceived benefits, organizational readiness, and external pressure. The analysis of these models takes into account the empirical literature, and the difference between independent and dependent variables. The paper also makes recommendations for future research.

 

Keywords: information technology, diffusion of innovations, DOI, theory, technology-organization-environment, TOE, framework, interorganizational systems, IOSs, institutional theory

 

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Journal Article

Extending Tam to Information Visualization: A Framework for Evaluation  pp46-58

Sabrina Bresciani, Martin Eppler

© Jul 2015 Volume 18 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

Abstract: Studies on the evaluation of information visualization techniques are flourishing, and related methodologies have been discussed in a growing number of recent studies. Yet, these evaluations concentrate mostly on usability measures and cognitive evaluations. In contrast, this contribution focuses on the various factors that drive the adoption of information visualization techniques. The Technology Acceptance Model and the Diffusion of Innovations theory are deployed to develop a framework for ev aluating information visualization adoption. These seminal theories are extended and adapted to Information Visualization, resulting into a framework with three main dimensions: perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived authority. The app lication of this theoretically‑based evaluation framework is illustrated through positive and negative examples. As many visualization solutions have not achieved a wide use, the question of which factors foster their adoption seems to be a particularly r elevant yet under‑researched topic.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Information Visualization, Technology Acceptance Model, Diffusion of Innovations, evaluation, adoption

 

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