The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Empirical Study on Knowledge Based Systems  pp11-20

Gabriela Avram

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

Knowledge‑based systems (KBSs) implement the heuristic human reasoning through specific techniques, procedures and mechanisms, in order to solve problems that do not have a traditional algorithmic solution. Research on this topic is being done in numerous organisations all over the world, from higher education laboratories to research institutes and software development organisations. A first research project, aimed at gathering information about the State‑of‑the‑Practice in building knowledge‑ based systems with practical applications, needed a preliminary study to ascertain if KBSs still exist today as a research topic, or the interest in them actually faded. The study was also required for finding organisations currently building KBSs for different domains. The project's aim was to catalogue the software andor knowledge engineering methods employed by the listed organisations, in order to draw a comprehensive image (State‑of‑the‑ Practice) of the field. The current paper contains the results of this preliminary study only. A second research project re‑used the results of the preliminary study, focusing on the study of KBSs' successful implementations as a basis for building a method that would allow practitioners to choose the most appropriate KM tools for each organisation's specific problems and situations. A trigger for this second project was the interest in studying the causes of KBSs rejection by the end‑users. An attempt to map the identified applications of KBSs to different phases of knowledge management lifecycle is also presented.

 

Keywords: knowledge-based systems, taxonomy, success, failure, knowledge management tools

 

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Journal Article

Citizen‑Centric Approach and Healthcare Management Based on the XML Web Services  pp179-186

Mayumi Hori, Masakazu Ohashi, Shotaro Suzuki

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

Citizen‑Centric Approach and Healthcare Management Based on the XML Web Services Mayumi Hori1, Masakazu Ohashi2 and Shotaro Suzuki3 1Hakuoh University, Tochigi, Japan 2Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan 3Microsoft Co Ltd. Tokyo, Japan m.hori@hakuoh.ac.jp ohashi@fps.chuo‑u.ac.jp shosuz@microsoft.com Abstract: We propose recommendations on how to improve healthcare management by utilizing the XML Web services, which enhance the quality and promote the efficiency of healthcare and medical services with a citizen‑centric, patient‑oriented approach.

 

Keywords: Citizen-centric, Patient-oriented, XML Web Services, Healthcare Management, Hub & Spoke, Collaborative Health.

 

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Journal Article

Using Value‑at‑Risk for ISIT Project and Portfolio Appraisal and Risk Management  pp1-6

Stefan Koch

© Mar 2006 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 43

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Abstract

This paper makes the case for adopting a risk measure from the finance sector for ISIT project and portfolio evaluation. The proposed value‑at‑risk approach constitutes a well‑tested approach in high‑risk environments, especially banking, and reports the expected maximum loss (or worst loss) over a target horizon within a given confidence interval. Value‑at‑risk is computed using either an analytical, parametric approach, or resorting to simulation, either based on historical samples or Monte Carlo methods. The main advantages of using value‑at‑risk measures are that they are methodologically consistent with modern ISIT evaluation approaches like real options, that they offer possibilities for management and assessment of ISIT project portfolios, and that the results are easy to interpret.

 

Keywords: IT investment, risk management, value-at-risk, project portfolio

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating e‑Commerce Success — A Case Study  pp15-26

Shaun Pather, Dan Remenyi, Andre de la Harpe

© May 2006 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 43

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Abstract

The business community in the past decade has been characterised by debate over the value or effectiveness of e‑Commerce and how this type of technology needs to be implemented. During this period the business world has witnessed many examples of failures of Internet based business. There is little doubt that the high failure rate in Dot.Coms had much to do with misconceptions regarding the ease with which e‑Commerce could be implemented. Unrealistic expectations caused tried and tested business rules to be abandoned as hyperbole over took sound business sense. Although it is clear today that the Internet and the Web can facilitate business processes to add value to organisations, this technology has to be managed with considerable care. This paper reports on a case study conducted in kalahari.net, a well known South African e‑Tailing business. This case study highlights several valuable lessons to do with the evaluation of an e‑Commerce investment and how to ensure its success. Specifically the case study closely examines aspects of kalahari.net's IS management policy, and identifies a set of preliminary e‑Commerce success dimensions.

 

Keywords: e-Business, e-Commerce, Internet business, web-facilitated business, Information Systems Management, business evaluation, IS success

 

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Journal Article

Stock Price Reaction to Investments in Information Technology: the Relevance of Cost Management Systems  pp27-30

Narcyz Roztocki, Heinz Roland Weistroffer

© Apr 2006 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 43

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Abstract

The identification of conditions and factors under which investments in Information Technology (IT) can be expected to yield tangible returns is the subject of many productivity studies. Event study methodology, which examines the reaction in the stock price to announcements of different types of IT investments, is one approach to this kind of research. In the research presented in this paper, we use event study methodology to investigate the effect of cost management systems on payoffs from IT investments. The motivation for our research is based on the assumption that companies possessing reliable cost management systems, such as Activity‑Based Costing (ABC), are less likely to make expensive mistakes when investing in IT. Furthermore, the companies that use ABC and thus know the costs of their operation, are better able to single out those IT projects which positively impact the bottom line and competitiveness. In our study, we use a sample of three companies that are adopters of ABC, to examine the impact of 81 IT investment announcements on stock prices.

 

Keywords: Activity-based costing, cost management systems, event study methodology, information technology productivity paradox

 

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Journal Article

The Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM): an Alternative View to Information Systems Project Measurement  pp185-200

Corlane Barclay, Kweku-Muata Osei-Bryson

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

The information systems (IS) project management profession has been faced with numerous socio‑technical challenges. As part of its analysis, research has expressed discontent with the traditional measures used to assess the success or failure of these projects, i.e. conformance to time, schedule and specification requirements espoused by the project management (PM) standard bodies. Despite this, research has also revealed that industry continues to place high reliance on this approach in determining the outcome of their projects. These developments imply, in part, a misalignment between research and practice and a scarcity of appropriate measurement tools that are aligned to the realities of different project contexts. The research presents a Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM) that attempts to address some of these concerns through the development of project measures that are aligned to key project stakeholders' values and objectives within the unique project contexts. It is argued that objectives are the key performance criteria of the project hence measures must be aligned to these criteria and formal procedures should be in place to assure that these objectives and measures are carefully developed and reflective of the persons to which the project matters, the stakeholders. The POMM is grounded on several principles of the Value Focused Thinking (VFT) and Goal Question Metric (GQM) techniques. The evaluation of the proposed model was performed in two parts: a team of industry experts examined the principles of model and provided feedback on its practicability to practice, and a case study of a Caribbean educational institution's IS graduate programme development was used to illustrate the procedures of the model. The research provides theoretical and practical implications for IS evaluation particularly within the project management and performance measurement domains. The research aims to extend the debate on suitable evaluation methods for IS projects while providing project practitioners with an alternative approach that can enhance their decision making processes during the life of the project.

 

Keywords: IS project, project objectives measurement model, POMM, success criteria, IS project management, Caribbean

 

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Journal Article

Economic Desirability and Traceability of Complex Products  pp201-212

Mordechai Ben-Menachem, Ilanit Gavious

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

The real values and benefits of Information Technologies are difficult to quantify and frequently even to identify accurately. Existing financial models such as Net Present Value have proven insufficient for complex products, for long‑ term corporate goals. IS projects and software‑rich products are decided upon while ignoring critical financial aspects, as the distance between the corporate product vision and the reality that engineers see may be very large. This paper maps between economics vis‑à‑vis IS‑based product management via an inter‑disciplinary approach, looking at the needs and exigencies of corporate management, IS project, products and software engineering. The basis for the article is a discussion of the difficulties in evaluation of the economic desirability of complex, software‑ rich products. It presents a dynamic corporate‑level model for economic profit evaluation designed to deal with the unique characteristics of such products, over many variants and versions, and the entire lifecycle. Given the extreme uncertainty of costs, benefits, risks and timeframes projections, the model facilitates real time reporting via an information system designed for management of Products, Portfolios and Projects. Whereas existing project management techniques such as Earned Value Management provide a general basis for managing project level activity, our model provides a longer‑term view to assess economic affects of corporate strategies over time. This is provided by a dynamic, Management Information System based aggregation of all product information, over an entire product lifecycle, with the objective to provide a knowledge base for corporate dynamic decision‑making. Concomitantly, the model fulfils Sarbanes‑Oxley Act of 2002 requirements for management assertion traceability of valid and accurate measures. These aspects co‑joined, from Sarbanes‑Oxley, back through multiple products, over myriad versions, and through automated requirements, design and testing tools, all combine to form an auditable management feedback loop that can be leveraged at multiple corporate management levels. The paper represents a significant step towards quality product decision‑making via a model that is meaningful, while also useful as it is leveraged through an automated tool set.

 

Keywords: economic profit, information systems, IS management, IS evaluation, product management, project management, traceability

 

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Journal Article

ICT Evaluation in the Irish Higher Education Sector  pp187-198

Marian Carcary

© Feb 2010 Volume 12 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp129 - 198

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Abstract

The Information and Communications Technology (ICT) evaluation literature now spans several decades. Nonetheless, evidence continues to suggest that there remains a lack of formal ICT evaluation practices within organisations. Several challenges exist, not least the social and political contexts within which evaluation takes place and limitations in existing evaluation techniques. However, while ICT evaluation exercises have spanned many fields of study, an in‑depth review of the ICT evaluation literature revealed that there is a paucity of ICT evaluation studies within the Higher Education sector. The 14 Irish Institutes of Technology (IoTs) have recently undergone an extensive transformation of their ICT systems. A national project launched by the Department of Education and Science and the Council of Directors of the IoTs performed a nationwide implementation of a suite of integrated Information Systems for library, human resources, finance and student management functions in order to standardise the ICT systems of the IoT sector. Yet, at the time of research, no formal evaluation of this project had been completed. This paper advances the body of ICT evaluation knowledge in the tertiary education sector through evaluating the impact of the Student MIS implementation within the IoTs. The research study was interpretive in nature; case studies based on multiple evidence sources were conducted in five IoTs. Analysis of the evidence led to the distillation of 15 findings on the Student MIS implementation which were centred on five key project areas – system selection, system development in the Irish IoTs, system commissioning, ex‑post performance at system start‑up and at the time of research. The 15 findings uncovered either support existing research in the ICT evaluation field or further advance the body of ICT evaluation theoretical knowledge. This paper makes a number of valuable contributions. It enhances understanding of ICT evaluation in tertiary education. It discusses the difficulties involved in operationalising a standard ICT system in multiple diverse organisations and provides lessons with respect to managing the difficulties experienced in large‑scale government projects.

 

Keywords: ICT investment management, ICT evaluation, ex-post evaluation, MIS, ICT in tertiary education

 

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