The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Evaluating Service Quality Dimensions within e‑Commerce SMEs  pp155-170

Graham D. April, Shaun Pather

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

With the continued growing investment in WWW technologies by e‑Commerce businesses the measurement of Information Systems (IS) effectiveness in this business sector has become increasingly important over the last decade. As business users, especially in the SME sector, have become reliant on outsourced IS service providers for a wide range of services, the quality of service rendered by the latter is an important issue which impacts on IS effectiveness. Researchers have since the 1990s recognised the importance of service quality as a measure of IS performance. The literature suggests that IS service delivery to e‑Commerce businesses needs to be evaluated differently to that of traditional brick‑and‑mortar businesses. There is however a paucity of research regarding IS evaluation in e‑Commerce environments, including that of the application of service quality principles. It is thus difficult for managers of IS service providers in this context to develop a complete picture of the effectiveness of the IS they deliver. This paper reports on a study which investigated whether IS service quality criteria and dimensions applied in large brick‑ and‑mortar organisations, are also applicable to SME e‑Commerce businesses in the tourism sector in South Africa. In pursuit of this objective an IS‑adapted SERVQUAL instrument was tested in an e‑Commerce SME environment. The research results indicate that, although SERVQUAL principles are applicable to the e‑Commerce SME context, the service quality dimensionality is different. The research derived four new dimensions for service quality expectations of e‑ Commerce SMEs viz., Credibility, Expertise, Availability and Supportiveness. A fifth dimension is the Tangibles dimension, which is retained from SERVQUAL. Furthermore the results indicate that the Credibility dimension was the most important dimension in this research context, while the Tangibles dimension was the least important.

 

Keywords: information systems, evaluation, e-commerce, WWW, service-quality, SME, SERVQUAL, IS outsourcing

 

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Journal Article

Exploring the SME Quandary: Data Governance in Practise in the Small to Medium‑Sized Enterprise Sector  pp3-13

Carolyn Begg, Tom Caira

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011, Editor: Walter Castelnovo and Elena Ferrari, pp1 - 148

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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore how small to medium‑sized enterprises (SMEs) perceive data and data governance and investigates whether current data governance frameworks are applicable to SMEs. Enterprises of all sizes and complexity have had to learn how to operate in an increasingly digital business environment. Such an environment demands that an enterprise equips itself with the ability to use its data effectively both internally and when dealing with external partners such as suppliers and customers. Enterprises now recognise that both their survival and success requires taking control of all aspects of their data as a critical business resource. In recognition of the demands placed on enterprises in this digital age, a discipline has emerged called data governance. Although the definition of data governance is still evolving, current usage describes this discipline as being a facilitator for enterprises to take control over all aspects of their data resource from the setting of integrity constraints for data quality to the creation of enterprise‑wide policies on data access and security. Large enterprises are often better placed to absorb the necessary demands that data governance places on resources. However, for the resource‑poor SME, the investment in data governance is far more challenging but nevertheless critical in the digital business environment. This paper reviews examples of published data governance frameworks to establish whether these frameworks are applicable to SMEs. A data governance framework (Khatri & Brown, 2010) is assessed using ten SMEs that have differing data requirements. This research is further enhanced by reviewing the results of a project which audited technology use in SMEs. This paper finds that although many data governance frameworks claim to be adaptable and scalable, there is little published evidence by industry or academics on the application of data governance to SMEs. Furthermore, our research revealed that the optimal use of data governance frameworks requires that those with authority and res

 

Keywords: data governance, SME, data management, data quality, framework

 

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Journal Article

The effects of ERP‑implementations on the non‑financial performance of small and medium‑sized enterprises in the Netherlands  pp103-115

Ivo De Loo, Jan Bots, Edwin Louwrink, Dave Meeuwsen, Pauline van Moorsel, Chantal Rozel

© Nov 2013 Volume 16 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp86 - 161

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Abstract

Abstract: In this paper we try to assess the impact of ERP‑implementations on the development of non‑financial organizational performance, as described by Shang and Seddon (2002) and Eckartz et al. (2009). We assess this impact for Dutch small and med ium‑sized enterprises, using a small but unique dataset. Several aspects of the performance of organizations are compared before and after the introduction of an ERP‑system, taking into account a three‑year period, and controlling for several influential factors (like organizational size, financial health and sectoral differences). We conclude that by and large, organizational performance increased significantly more for organizations that implemented an ERP‑system in the last three years than for organ izations that did not implement such a system. We also conclude that organizations that implemented an ERP‑system at most three years ago did not have significantly lower non‑financial performance than organizations that did not implement such a system. A dditional analyses suggest that we would oversell our results if we would claim that ERP‑systems are the main or sole source of the effects found. Nevertheless, although limited to Dutch SMEs, our results contradict some of the views expressed in the ERP‑ literature.

 

Keywords: : ERP systems, organizational performance, organizational benefits, non-financial performance, SME, surveys

 

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Journal Article

The Adoption of Cloud Computing by Irish SMEs … an Exploratory Study  pp3-14

Dr. Marian Carcary, Dr. Eileen Doherty, Gerard Conway

© Jul 2014 Volume 17 Issue 1, Special issue from ECIME 2013, Editor: Prof Przemyslaw Lech, pp1 - 121

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Abstract

Abstract: Cloud Computing adoption has experienced a considerable rate of growth since its emergence in 2006. By 2011, it had become the top technology priority for organizations worldwide and according to some leading industry reports the cloud computing market is estimated to reach $241 billion by 2020. Reasons for adoption are multi‑fold, including for example the expected realisation of benefits pertaining to cost reduction, improved scalability, improved resource utilization, worker mobility and coll aboration, and business continuity, among others. Research into cloud computing adoption has to date primarily focused on the larger, multinational enterprises. However, one key area where cloud computing is expected to hold considerable promise is for th e Small and Medium Sized Enterprise (SME). SMEs are recognized as being inherently different from their large firm counterparts, not least from a resource constraint perspective and for this reason, cloud computing is reported to offer significant benef its for SMEs through, for example, facilitating a reduction in the financial burden associated with new technology adoption. This paper reports findings from a recent exploratory study into Cloud Computing adoption among Irish SMEs. Despite its purported importance, this study found that almost half of the respondents had not migrated any services or processes to the cloud environment. Further, with respect to those who had transitioned to the cloud, the data suggests that many of these SMEs did not rigor ously assess their readiness for adopting cloud computing technology or did not adopt in‑depth approaches for managing their engagement with cloud. While the study is of an exploratory nature, nevertheless the findings have important implications for the development/ improvement of national strategies or policies to support the successful adoption of Cloud Computing technology among the SME market. This research has implications for academic research in this area as well as proposing a number of practical recommendations to support the SME cloud adop

 

Keywords: Keywords: cloud computing, SMEs, cloud adoption readiness, reasons for cloud non-adoption, SME cloud adoption models, survey research

 

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Journal Article

E‑Supply Chain Coordination and SME Performance: An Empirical Investigation  pp76-84

Dr Rui Bi

© Nov 2017 Volume 20 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp59 - 141

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Abstract

This study investigates the impact of key antecedents from technology‑organization‑environment contexts on developing e‑supply chain coordination capability in the small‑to‑medium enterprise (SME) context. Using data from 271 SMEs in Australia, we find that e‑supply chain coordination is driven by IT infrastructure, business partnerships, and customer power. In addition, SMEs with strong e‑supply chain coordination capability can achieve outstanding business performance. This study provides an empirical evidence to understand the relationships between these antecedents, e‑supply chain coordination capability, and SME performance. These findings suggest that e‑business practice is one of key factors that contribute to SME success. SME managers should understand how to utilize internal and external resources to develop e‑business competences in order to achieve business goals.

 

Keywords: E-Supply Chain Coordination, SME Performance, Technology-Organization-Environment Framework, Resource-based View of the Firms

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating the Benefits of Regional Electronic Marketplaces: Assessing the Quality of the REM Success Model  pp11-20

Denise E Gengatharen, Craig Standing

© Jan 2004 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

A number of regional Internet electronic marketplaces (REMs) have failed or are floundering, partly due to the lack of proper evaluation of their costs and benefits. This paper uses a conceptual REM Success Model to examine the costs and benefits of a REM in Western Australia. The model has been derived from an extension to the Updated DeLone & McClean IS Success Model. The findings from the case study indicate that the REM Success Model, which includes cognisance of SME‑profile and motivation of the market maker, allows up‑front identification of the costs and benefits to all stakeholders.

 

Keywords: E-Commerce, Regional Electronic Marketplaces, Small and Medium Enterprises, SMEs, Evaluation of Benefits, REM Success Model

 

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Journal Article

Seven Ways to get Your Favoured IT Project Accepted — Politics in IT Evaluation  pp31-40

Egon Berghout, Menno Nijland, Kevin Grant

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

IS managers are being put under increasing pressure to justify the value of corporate ITIS expenditure. Their constant quest for the 'holy grail' continues, as existing methods and approaches of justifying ITIS expenditure are still failing to deliver. The decision making process is not as objective and transparent as it is claimed or intended to be. This paper discusses seven commonly used tactics used by business managers to influence IT appraisals. The paper takes a 'devil's advocate' position and adopts some irony when looking at the area of power and politics in IT evaluation. Rather than promoting the use of these techniques, this article aims to raise awareness that IT evaluation is not as rational as most IT evaluation researcherspractitioners would want it to be or indeed claim it to be. It is argued that rationalisation or counter tactics may counteract influence techniques in an attempt to get behind the cloak and dagger side of organisational power and politics, but politics and power in decision‑making cannot and should not be filtered out. Due to dissimilarities of objectives, limitations of time and information, influence techniques will always be used. However, rather than being counterproductive, these techniques are essential in the process of decision making of IT projects. They help organisations reach better decisions, which receive more commitment than decisions that were forced to comply with strictly rational approaches. Awareness of the influence and manipulation techniques used in practice will help to deal with power and politics in IT evaluation and thereby come to better IT investment decisions.

 

Keywords: IT Evaluation, IT Decision Making, IT Assessment, Information Economics, Decision Making, Organisational Power & Politics Information Management

 

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Journal Article

Peer Assessment: A Complementary Instrument to Recognise Individual Contributions in IS Student Group Projects  pp61-70

Elsje Scott, Nata van der Merwe, Derek Smith

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

This paper discusses peer assessment as a component of the assessment strategy used for Information Systems student group projects at a South African university. The value of peer assessment and the contribution to the real‑life experience offered by group projects, will be discussed. It will also illustrate how this process adds value by enhancing deep learning. Its value as a complementary assessment instrument in a multiple assessment strategy and how the results of peer assessment are used to recognise individual contributions to group performance will be illustrated. The use of peer assessment as an instrument for both informal formative assessment and formal summative assessment will be described. To perform the peer assessment specific instruments were designed and used throughout the lifecycle of the course.

 

Keywords: Peer assessment, group work, assessment, self-assessment, IS Project

 

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