The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Evaluating the Benefits of Regional Electronic Marketplaces: Assessing the Quality of the REM Success Model  pp11-20

Denise E Gengatharen, Craig Standing

© Jan 2004 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

A number of regional Internet electronic marketplaces (REMs) have failed or are floundering, partly due to the lack of proper evaluation of their costs and benefits. This paper uses a conceptual REM Success Model to examine the costs and benefits of a REM in Western Australia. The model has been derived from an extension to the Updated DeLone & McClean IS Success Model. The findings from the case study indicate that the REM Success Model, which includes cognisance of SME‑profile and motivation of the market maker, allows up‑front identification of the costs and benefits to all stakeholders.

 

Keywords: E-Commerce, Regional Electronic Marketplaces, Small and Medium Enterprises, SMEs, Evaluation of Benefits, REM Success Model

 

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Journal Article

Empirical Study on Knowledge Based Systems  pp11-20

Gabriela Avram

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

Knowledge‑based systems (KBSs) implement the heuristic human reasoning through specific techniques, procedures and mechanisms, in order to solve problems that do not have a traditional algorithmic solution. Research on this topic is being done in numerous organisations all over the world, from higher education laboratories to research institutes and software development organisations. A first research project, aimed at gathering information about the State‑of‑the‑Practice in building knowledge‑ based systems with practical applications, needed a preliminary study to ascertain if KBSs still exist today as a research topic, or the interest in them actually faded. The study was also required for finding organisations currently building KBSs for different domains. The project's aim was to catalogue the software andor knowledge engineering methods employed by the listed organisations, in order to draw a comprehensive image (State‑of‑the‑ Practice) of the field. The current paper contains the results of this preliminary study only. A second research project re‑used the results of the preliminary study, focusing on the study of KBSs' successful implementations as a basis for building a method that would allow practitioners to choose the most appropriate KM tools for each organisation's specific problems and situations. A trigger for this second project was the interest in studying the causes of KBSs rejection by the end‑users. An attempt to map the identified applications of KBSs to different phases of knowledge management lifecycle is also presented.

 

Keywords: knowledge-based systems, taxonomy, success, failure, knowledge management tools

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating Success in Post‑Merger IS Integration: A Case Study  pp143-150

Maria Alaranta

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

Despite the importance of post‑merger IS integration to the success of the whole merger, post‑merger IS inte‑ gration literature remains scarce. This paper attempts to synthesise the often implicit or vague definitions of post‑merger IS integration success with those provided in the vast body of literature on IS evaluation. As a result, four categories of success issues for post‑merger IS integration are proposed: User satisfaction with the integrated software's system and information quality as well as its use; Efficient and effective IS integration management; Efficient IS staff integration; and IS ability to support the underlying motives of the merger.

 

Keywords: IS Integration, Mergers, Acquisitions, M&A, Success, IS Evaluation

 

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Journal Article

The Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM): an Alternative View to Information Systems Project Measurement  pp185-200

Corlane Barclay, Kweku-Muata Osei-Bryson

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

The information systems (IS) project management profession has been faced with numerous socio‑technical challenges. As part of its analysis, research has expressed discontent with the traditional measures used to assess the success or failure of these projects, i.e. conformance to time, schedule and specification requirements espoused by the project management (PM) standard bodies. Despite this, research has also revealed that industry continues to place high reliance on this approach in determining the outcome of their projects. These developments imply, in part, a misalignment between research and practice and a scarcity of appropriate measurement tools that are aligned to the realities of different project contexts. The research presents a Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM) that attempts to address some of these concerns through the development of project measures that are aligned to key project stakeholders' values and objectives within the unique project contexts. It is argued that objectives are the key performance criteria of the project hence measures must be aligned to these criteria and formal procedures should be in place to assure that these objectives and measures are carefully developed and reflective of the persons to which the project matters, the stakeholders. The POMM is grounded on several principles of the Value Focused Thinking (VFT) and Goal Question Metric (GQM) techniques. The evaluation of the proposed model was performed in two parts: a team of industry experts examined the principles of model and provided feedback on its practicability to practice, and a case study of a Caribbean educational institution's IS graduate programme development was used to illustrate the procedures of the model. The research provides theoretical and practical implications for IS evaluation particularly within the project management and performance measurement domains. The research aims to extend the debate on suitable evaluation methods for IS projects while providing project practitioners with an alternative approach that can enhance their decision making processes during the life of the project.

 

Keywords: IS project, project objectives measurement model, POMM, success criteria, IS project management, Caribbean

 

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Journal Article

B2C e‑Commerce Success: a Test and Validation of a Revised Conceptual Model  pp109-126

Irwin Brown, Ruwanga Jayakody

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

Since the advent of the Internet, B2C e‑Commerce has grown substantially across the globe. Whilst much research has examined factors influencing adoption of e‑commerce, not as many studies have investigated the post‑ adoption phenomenon of success. Those studies that have investigated IS success and the extensions required to accommodate e‑commerce have mainly been conceptual. Few have attempted to test and validate the models empirically. The purpose of this study was to fill this gap. By drawing from the technology acceptance model, expectation‑confirmation theory and IS success theory, a revised conceptual model was derived. The model and relationships were tested and validated using data gathered from 166 online consumers in South Africa. 7 interrelated dimensions of B2C e‑commerce success were confirmed, namely service quality, system quality, information quality, trust, perceived usefulness, user satisfaction and continuance intentions. Direct relationships between dimensions were identified. These showed that user intentions to continue using an online retail site are directly influenced by perceived usefulness, user satisfaction and system quality. User satisfaction is directly influenced by service quality and perceived usefulness, whilst perceived usefulness is directly influenced by trust and information quality. Trust in the online retailer is directly influenced by service quality and system quality. The implications of these and other findings are discussed.

 

Keywords: IS success, e-commerce success, B2C e-commerce, DeLone and McLean

 

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Journal Article

Critical Success Factors in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System Implementation: An Exploratory Study in Oman  pp36-45

Ahmad Saleh Shatat

© Jul 2015 Volume 18 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

Abstract: The ERP system has been the subject of much academic discussion in recent times. The impact that a successful implementation can have on an organization cannot be overstated. The factors which are crucial to the successful implementation of an E RP system are commonly known as Critical Success Factors (hereinafter CSFs). This study investigated the CSFs that play a crucial role during the implementation process in Omani organizations. Moreover, it identified the CSFs that are most important in ensuring a successful ERP system implementation. The survey was distributed to 35 enterprises using an ERP system. The managers of those enterprises identified 10 CSFs as the most important.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Critical Success Factors, ERP, Implementation, Oman

 

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Journal Article

Implementing Business Analytics within the Supply Chain: Success and Fault Factors  pp112-120

Douglas Hawley

© May 2016 Volume 19 Issue 2, ECIME 2015, Editor: Elias Pimenidis, pp83 - 134

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Abstract

Abstract: Implementing business analytics across a large company is more about understanding that organization‚†ís culture, than it is about the actual technology. Understanding an organization‚†ís motivation, advantages and roadblocks is imperative for s uccessful implementation and benefit. This research examines both the critical success factors along with the implementation faults of the largest steel producer in North America, and discusses how these cultural factors play out on a large scale during a n ERP implementation. First, this research identifies general critical success factors as business plan and vision; change management; communication; ERP team composition, skills and compensation; project management; top management support and championshi p; and system analysis, selection and technical implementation (Hoon Na and Delgado 2006). Then, general implementation faults are identified as operational problems, motivational problems, knowledge problems and regulatory problems (Mayntz 1997 in Nie haves, Klose, Becker 2006). These theories are applied to the specific case of Nucor Steel. Application is contextualized through a historical perspective, identifying a low‑cost business model, and enormous divisional autonomy as hindrances to the imple mentation of a common, shared ERP. A timeline of business analytics at the company is given, beginning in 2002, at which point a culture shift occurred though the acquisition of a major competitor. Divisional autonomy at this time, began to be challenged, leading to easier integration of reporting systems and cross‑company data analysis. Then, details are provided as to how this company is making a case for a new, innovative, business model and how it is developing needed expertise in the area of business analytics. Changes in the steel business are requiring companies to move from a low‑cost model to a value‑added model increasing the need for innovation in all areas of the company. These innovations inevitably require the use of more complex data analyt ics that cut across the entire company, instead

 

Keywords: Keywords: success factors, implementation faults, business analytics, enterprise resource planning, ERP, historical considerations

 

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Journal Article

Toward an Understanding of Business Intelligence Systems Success: A South African Study  pp24-38

Taurayi Mudzana, Manoj Maharaj

© Jul 2017 Volume 20 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 54

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Abstract

This study investigates the success factors of business intelligence (BI) systems across three employment groups in South Africa. The three categories of employment groups are: top management, middle management, and operational staff. Based on a review of literature grounded on the DeLone and McLean model, a research model was proposed. This study hypothesized that information quality, system quality, service quality, user quality, user satisfaction, and individual impact are factors that might contribute to the success of BI systems among the different employment groups in South Africa. The proposed model was validated using responses taken from 211 BI users. The managerial implications of the findings are that differentiated BI implementation strategies aimed at specific employment groups might improve success rates, as opposed to a single broad‑brush strategy for all end users. The paper concludes by discussing the limitations of the study, which should be addressed in future research.

 

Keywords: business intelligence; information systems success; South Africa; DeLone and McLean

 

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