The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Understanding IT Management in SMEs  pp27-34

Paul Cragg, Annette Mills, Theek Suraweera

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

There is evidence in the IT literature indicating that IT management is one factor that influences IT success. In addition, there is much literature indicating that IT management is important in the SME context. However, much of this literature has focused on the important role of the owner and/or other senior managers. For example, Thong et al (1996) focused on top management support and its influence on IT success. This paper argues that top management support is only one aspect of IT management and other aspects of IT management have received little attention in studies of SMEs. The study commenced with a review of the literature which identified many different definitions of IT management. However, the broader management literature indicated that the classical functions of planning, organising, controlling and leading provide an excellent way of conceptualising the many activities involved in managing (Carroll and Gillen, 1987). The management literature also provided working definitions for the four management functions. A multiple‑case study approach was then used to collect evidence from four SMEs (with between four and 50 employees). The data identified IT management practices associated with each of the four IT functions, ie, IT planning, IT organising, IT controlling and IT leading. For example, one firm had an IT committee made up of staff from different levels of the firm. Some on the committee would be assigned specific IT responsibilities, eg, training of other staff. This practice provided an example of IT organising, ie, of defining tasks and assigning personnel. Similarly, many other IT management practices were both identified and classified. The results provide a significant foundation for researchers of IT management in SMEs. For example, the conceptualisation indicates four IT management functions. Also, the definitions clarify important aspects of IT management. The study also indicated that some aspects of IT management have received little attention in prior studies. For example, while IT planning has received considerable attention, IT leading in SMEs has only been examined in the narrower context of top management support. Furthermore, few studies have examined the role and importance of IT organising and IT controlling in the SME context. Thus the study also indicates directions for future research, including the identification of IT management best practices.

 

Keywords: small business, IT management, IT management practices, accounting firms

 

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Journal Article

Improving the Benefits of IT Compliance Using Enterprise Management Information Systems  pp27-38

Renata Paola Dameri

© Jan 2009 Volume 12 Issue 1, ECIME 2008, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 118

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Abstract

During the latest years, IT governance has become more and more important. More of the attention on IT Governance is captured by compliance, owing to the recent financial scandals and the severe rules regarding information systems audit and control. Companies need to comply with these rules, but it requires important investments, considered not only strategic but necessary (Remenyi et. al. 2000). However, companies should analyse the compliance requirements to implement an IT governance system, not only to comply with legal rules, but also to improve the strategic alignment between IT and business and to optimise value creation by IT compliance investments (Ventrakaman and Henderson 1996, Van Grembergen 2003). However, companies have difficulties in implementing IT compliance initiatives, because they are complex and require an integrated approach all over the organization. But IT compliance initiatives often lack an integrated, strategic approach: they only try to comply with the increasing rules affecting IT operations, thereby limiting the value of compliance investments. To optimise IT compliance, companies should develop an IT compliance strategy, aiming not only to accomplish with regulations, but also to bring processes into compliance. That is, to realise a full integration between operations, risk control, data reliability. To reach this result, compliance automated solutions are indicated, like GCR (Governance, Risk and Compliance) applications. However, standard solutions fail to support specific problems and the individual value proposition of each company: an EIMS (Enterprise Information Management Systems), developed in house, allows automatically managed processes, data and information security, to access control and system performance and to improve data usability, in accordance with company specific organisation and needs. In this paper, IT compliance is introduced, to define how to orient it to value creation; GRC systems. EIM systems are described, with their different cost and benefits for companies. The aim of the paper is to define how to develop compliance automated systems, to save money and enhance information integration and value. Observations and conclusions derive from practical experience of the author, participating to a project of EIM implementation in a major Italian company.

 

Keywords: IT governance, risk management, accounting information systems, IT compliance, knowledge management

 

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Journal Article

Do IS consultants enhance IS competences in SMEs?  pp14-25

Adrian Bradshaw, Paul Cragg, Venkat Pulakanam

© Jun 2013 Volume 16 Issue 1, ECIME 2012, Editor: Dr. David Sammon and Dr. Tadhg Nagle, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

Abstract: Many small and medium‑sized enterprises (SMEs) turn to consultants for assistance with IS projects, for example, to help the firm select and implement a new system. Prior studies have shown that consultants have a major influence on IS success for SMEs. However, despite its importance to IS success, relatively little research has focused on the relationship between SMEs and IS consultants and whether this relationship has any impact or influence on the development of IS competences in SMEs. T his study investigates whether consultants compensate for or enhance an SMEs IS competences during a major IS project. A multiple case study approach was adopted involving SMEs who implemented an Accounting Information System (AIS). The case firms prov ide evidence that SMEs lack many IS skills and abilities. The study identified a number of competences that are compensated or enhanced by consultants. The major finding of this study is that IS consultants help SMEs overcome a lack of IS competences, rat her than help develop IS competences within an SME. Managing the relationship between consultant and SME is crucial for SMEs lacking many IS competences.

 

Keywords: Keywords: IS projects, IS consultants, SMEs, competences, Resource-based Theory, Accounting Information System

 

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Journal Article

The Five‑dimensional Reflective Cycle Framework for Designing Financial Information Management Systems Courses  pp241-254

Hien Minh Thi Tran, Farshid Anvari

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: Financial Information Management Systems (FIMS) or Accounting Information Systems (AIS) is a cross‑discipline subject, often taught by Computing and Accounting disciplines. In recent years, demand for this subject has grown. However, educato rs have lamented high failure rates among AIS students; professional bodies have reported that graduates lack sufficient meta‑cognitive knowledge of information systems to perform their tasks. Students have reported that their knowledge of databases, ente rprise resource planning and relevant technology topics is lacking. Quality teaching of FIMS or AIS requires instructors to actively update their knowledge of accounting systems and information technology as well as to reflect on their teaching techniques . Reflection and reflective practices are taught within the education discipline, and have grown in popularity among many other disciplines. Yet little has been written about how accounting and IT professionals reflect on their practice and how they apply their reflections to their teaching. Through our case study at an Australian university, we discuss (1) the rationale for the importance of constructivist theory, cognitive load theory, reflective and action‑research in teaching and learning, (2) Blo om⠒s Revised Taxonomy, (3) the application of Bloom and the reflective concept for the design and delivery of FIMS courses, (4) reflection on our strategies for applying these concepts (5) how reflective professionals can assist instructors in t he design and delivery of FIMS courses and, (6) how the proposed five‑dimensional reflective cycle framework can assist academics in the design of AIS courses. Our study supports the view that reflection, within the proposed framework, is an effective strategy; and that Bloom⠒s Revised Taxonomy and the PEER Model are tools which can assist instructors to teach FIMS and AIS courses in a way that enhances participant⠒s learning abilities. We present a five‑dimensional reflective cycle framework t hat facilitates reflective practice among academic and prof

 

Keywords: Keywords: constructivist theory, Blooms Revised Taxonomy, active learning, five-dimensional reflective cycle framework, evaluation, financial information management systems, FIMS, accounting information systems, AIS

 

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Journal Article

A Heuristic Approach to the Adoption and Implementation of Activity Based Costing Information Systems  pp59-76

Behrouz Zarei, Ramin Sepehri Rad, Fereshteh Ghapanchi, Amir Hossein Ghapanchi

© Jul 2015 Volume 18 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

Abstract: For successful implementation of Activity Based Costing (ABC) information systems, like any other Accounting Information System (AIS), there are several key points to be considered. Several researchers have studied factors influencing succes s in various stages of Activity Based Costing Information Systems (ABCIS) development. However, a gap in the literature concerns a lack of research for the development of a taxonomy of heuristic principles for better implementation and successful utiliz ation of ABCISs. This paper offers a detailed analysis of ABCISs by: (i) reviewing literature studies in order to build a more exhaustive list of success factors of ABCIS. Twenty primary and twenty‑two secondary success factors are identified; and (ii ) running four rounds of grounded action research through interviews in a case study of a bank. Twenty‑seven heuristics for the successful implementation of ABCIS are derived. Finally, the paper demonstrates the extent to which each heuristic may address each main success factor. Implications of the results for researchers and practitioners are subsequently proposed.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Activity-based Costing, ABC, Activity-based Costing Information Systems, ABCIS, Accounting Information Systems, AIS, Heuristics.

 

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Journal Article

Designing a Process‑Oriented Framework for IT Performance Management Systems  pp211-220

Sertac Son, Tim Weitzel, Francois Laurent

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

This paper shows, which concepts and frameworks currently exist to measure the performance of the IT de‑partment and its delivered IS services. We discuss how a performance management system might be designed and im‑ plemented with the purpose to monitor and improve the IT function. A performance metrics catalogue has been elabo‑ rated to document and to enable a common understanding of the individual metrics. Finally, this paper provides lessons learned and some recommendations for further research in the area of IT performance management.

 

Keywords: Performance metrics, balanced scorecard, causality, performance manager, accounting

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special / Nov 2005  pp143‑230

Editor: Dan Remenyi

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Keywords: IS integration, Mergers, Acquisitions, M&A, Success, IS evaluation, Evaluation framework, Web-based aptitude test, User acceptance, DART approach, IT value, Strategic value, Technology value, Strategy, Innovation, Failure-prone decision process, IS business value, IS evaluation project, Citizen-centric, Patient-oriented, XML web services, Healthcare management, Hub and spoke, Collaborative health, Evaluation, e-Prescription, Interdisciplinary research, Software process innovations, Organisation learning, Adoption, Individual learning styles, Computer capital, Complementary effects, Productivity, Software, Productive efficiency, Perfomance metrics, Balanced scorecard, Causality, Performance manager, Accounting, ERP implementation, IT investments, Business value, Investment quality

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 11 Issue 1 / Mar 2008  pp1‑51

Editor: Dan Remenyi

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Keywords: accounting techniques, business systems integration, cluster analysis, communication and technology (ICT), credit card system, diffusion, e-commerce, e-tourism, information technologies, new technologies in e-museums, payment models, performability, PPD, probabilistic model checking, probit model, product-process dependencies, simulation, SMEs, software development, software process improvement, usability of cultural sites

 

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