The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Benefits, Justification and Implementation Planning of Real‑Time Business Intelligence Systems  pp105-119

Kiril Dobrev, Mike Hart

© Sep 2015 Volume 18 Issue 2, The special issue from ECIME 2014, Editor: Jan Devos, pp93 - 210

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Abstract

Abstract: While traditional Business Intelligence (BI) environments have for some time assisted organizations with their information requirements, they have become increasingly incompatible with the pressures of current business environments. They are g eared towards analysis of historical information, and limited in their ability to close the latency gap between information and action. This has encouraged a movement towards real‑time BI (RTBI) systems. Although these overcome latency aspects of tradit ional BI, and offer many value‑adding benefits to organizations, their implementation has been hampered by technological complexities, and has required changes to the business environment, and high costs to put them in place. Justification of such IT inve stments remains a problem as they provide many intangible benefits incompatible with traditional (financial) IT benefits measurement models. For these reasons, the research set out to investigate and understand the technological components and organizat ional changes surrounding RTBI implementation. To further facilitate justification, application areas and benefits of RTBI were also explored. Data was collected through semi‑structured in‑depth interviews in organizations across several industries that h ad implemented or were implementing RTBI systems. A qualitative thematic analysis was then used to investigate the issues further. The study confirmed that RTBI is likely to require major changes to technical architecture, which may involve acquisition of new tools and technologies. Several issues at the organisational level also need to be addressed, and the research uncovered a wide range of practical RTBI applications and analytics applied across industries; process intelligence was found to play a fun damental role in many of these. The study reveals that RTBI can offer significant and measurable improvements, help organizations remain competitive, and in the long run, drive strategic business objectives from a grass roots level. To assist organisation s to take advantage of this, a roadmap for RTBI justification and implementation planning is suggested.

 

Keywords: Keywords: business intelligence, real-time BI, BI maturity, analytics, process intelligence, operational BI, justification

 

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Journal Article

Implementing Business Analytics within the Supply Chain: Success and Fault Factors  pp112-120

Douglas Hawley

© May 2016 Volume 19 Issue 2, ECIME 2015, Editor: Elias Pimenidis, pp83 - 134

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Abstract

Abstract: Implementing business analytics across a large company is more about understanding that organization⠒s culture, than it is about the actual technology. Understanding an organization⠒s motivation, advantages and roadblocks is imperative for s uccessful implementation and benefit. This research examines both the critical success factors along with the implementation faults of the largest steel producer in North America, and discusses how these cultural factors play out on a large scale during a n ERP implementation. First, this research identifies general critical success factors as business plan and vision; change management; communication; ERP team composition, skills and compensation; project management; top management support and championshi p; and system analysis, selection and technical implementation (Hoon Na and Delgado 2006). Then, general implementation faults are identified as operational problems, motivational problems, knowledge problems and regulatory problems (Mayntz 1997 in Nie haves, Klose, Becker 2006). These theories are applied to the specific case of Nucor Steel. Application is contextualized through a historical perspective, identifying a low‑cost business model, and enormous divisional autonomy as hindrances to the imple mentation of a common, shared ERP. A timeline of business analytics at the company is given, beginning in 2002, at which point a culture shift occurred though the acquisition of a major competitor. Divisional autonomy at this time, began to be challenged, leading to easier integration of reporting systems and cross‑company data analysis. Then, details are provided as to how this company is making a case for a new, innovative, business model and how it is developing needed expertise in the area of business analytics. Changes in the steel business are requiring companies to move from a low‑cost model to a value‑added model increasing the need for innovation in all areas of the company. These innovations inevitably require the use of more complex data analyt ics that cut across the entire company, instead

 

Keywords: Keywords: success factors, implementation faults, business analytics, enterprise resource planning, ERP, historical considerations

 

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Journal Article

A Visualization‑based Approach to Present and Assess Technical Documentation Quality  pp150-159

Anna Wingkvist, Morgan Ericsson, Welf Lowe

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Technical documentation has moved from printed booklets to electronic versions that need to be updated continuously to match product development and user demands. There is an imminent need to ensure the quality of technical documentation, i.e., information that follows a product. In order to ensure the quality of technical documentation, it is important to be able to measure it in a constructive way. In this paper, we approach quality from a software quality perspective and rely on automated measurements and analyses. It is generally not possible to assess quality attributes such as “ease of understanding” using automated measurements. To assess such quality attributes, we suggest the use of visualizations as a communication medium between the machine results and technical writers, and define a visualization‑based quality assessment approach for technical documentation. In order to test our approach, we use it to assess the quality of 3 real‑world documentations from a Swedish mobile phone manufacture, a Japanese camera manufacturer, and a Swedish warship producer. The study shows that our approach can be used to identify potential quality defects. For example, we tested an unclassified subset of the warship’s technical documentation and found that 49% of it was redundant text clones. We performed the study in collaboration with a Swedish company that is in charge of creating and maintaining the 3 documentations, and they acknowledge that our approach has great potential and that our results proved helpful to them.

 

Keywords: Information Quality, Software Analysis, Software Visualization, Technical Documentation, Visual Analytics

 

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