The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Enterprise Architecture Principles and their impact on the Management of IT Investments  pp53-62

Kalevi Pessi, Thanos Magoulas, Mats-Ake Hugoson

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

The strategic role of IT and its significance throughout the organization in¬creases com¬plexity, variety, and the need of change. Hence IT management must deal with uncertainties derived from different, conflicting and ever changing demands. In this sense Enterprise Architecture is playing an increasingly important role in improving IT management practice. If contemporary organizations do not succeed in managing architectural issues, there is a clear risk that considerable resources will be invested without achieving desirable ef¬fects. This paper investigates how Enterprise Architecture Principles impact on the management of IT‑investments in the context of large organizations. The purpose of the paper is to provide a deeper insight of the relationship between Enterprise Architecture and management of IT Investments throughout the elucidation of two significant types of principles: Delineation (differentiation) principles and Interoperability (integration) principles. Our conclusion is that the choice of architectural principles has an impact both on alignment between information systems and business demands and on the management of IT investments. This impact concerns at least four aspects: (1) The responsibility for IT investments (2) Time to value (3) Long term alignment, (4) Coordination of investments in information systems with changes in business processes.

 

Keywords: Enterprise architecture, information systems architecture, business architecture, architectural principles, business value, management of it investments

 

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Journal Article

Is There a Paradox Involved with the Progress Represented by ICT Developments?  pp77-92

Dan Remenyi, Shawren Singh

© Jul 2015 Volume 18 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

Abstract: The developments in ICT since the first computers were implemented have facilitated changes to society in a number of important ways. These changes have occurred steadily and have been accepted largely without discussion as to how they have impa cted the way our society functions. These developments in ICT and their resulting applications have been perceived as progress, but there has been little if any discussion as to what actually constitutes progress. Although ICT has delivered great benefits there is clearly some downside to the technology, which has not been adequately addressed and which deserves careful attention. In fact a review of papers in the Electronic Journal of IS Evaluation reveals no comment on this important subject and this st udy serves to fill a gap in the literature. This paper reports on the findings of an exploratory study which includes the results of a qualitative survey. The main objective of the paper is to review the impact of ICT on society by examining the benefits which have been facilitated by its implementation, while at the same time considering the challenges the technology offers. The paper concludes with a call for more awareness of how ICT is changing our society and for a more in depth discussion and deba te on what the implications are for society of the increasing and ubiquitous application of the technology.

 

Keywords: Keywords: ICT and progress, benefits and challenges, downside of technology, Business architecture, auto-voyeurism, spam, ICT facilitated fraud, ICT and personal convenience, depersonalisation, technological determinism

 

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Journal Article

The overlapping nature of Business Analysis and Business Architecture: what we need to know  pp169-179

Tiko Iyamu, Monica Nehemia-Maletzky, Irja Shaanika

© Dec 2016 Volume 19 Issue 3, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp135 - 212

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Abstract

Abstract: The concepts of business architecture and business analysis have many things in common. The commonalities bring beneficiary synergy to the organisations that employ both concepts. However, they also impose challenges, such as how they align, integrate or complement each other within an organisation. Also, some of the challenges lead to confusion, disorientation and defragmentation of processes and activities in many organisations where both concepts are employed in parallel. The challenges get even worse as they increasingly continue to impact structures in some organisations, which happen through allocation of roles and responsibilities between business analysis and business architecture units. Thus, the parallelism of both concepts raises fundamental question ‑ whether the business analysis and business architecture are roles or titles. This confusion manifests itself into power struggle and selective accountability of practical unconsciousness, as actors exert their mandates and authority within an organisation. These challenges and confusion happens at different levels, and does affect the organisation’s performances. This article examines, discusses and highlights the distinction between the business analysis and business architecture, from the perspective of the computing environment. The article reveals differentiation, functionalism and serviceability as some of the critical factors, which influence the challenges and confusion that are posed by the concepts’ parallelism. Also examined are the implications of parallelism, which both concepts bring into an organisational environment. The findings from the study are intended to reduce negative impacts that the confusion and challenges do unconsciously and in practice have on processes and activities in organisations that employs both concepts in parallel.

 

Keywords: Keywords: business analysis, business architecture, parallelism, alignment, roles, responsibilities and organisational structure

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue / Jan 2011  pp1‑166

Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto

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Editorial

miguel_neto Dr Miguel de Castro Neto is presently Associate Dean at the Instituto Superior de Estatística e Gestão de Informação of the Universidade Nova de Lisboa (ISEGI‑UNL), where he is Invited Assistant Professor. He is editor of the Journal of Information Technology in Agriculture (JITAg), member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Online Information Review journal, and Scientific Advisor of the Revista Brasileira de Agroinformática.  Miguel de Castro Neto holds a PhD in Agronomic Engineering (Universidade Técnica de Lisboa) in the field of Internet‑based agricultural information systems, a Masters degree in Agricultural Economics (Universidade de Évora), a Masters degree extension in Statistics and Information Management (Universidade Nova de Lisboa) and a degree in Agricultural Engineering (Universidade de Évora).His research interests include Business Intelligence, Knowledge management and Social Computing.

Editorial

This special edition of the EJISE includes thirteen selected papers presented at the 4th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation ‑ ECIME 2010 which were considered the most important contributions to the advances in the information systems evaluation field of study.

The conference was held at Instituto Superior de Estatística e Gestão from the Universidade Nova de Lisboa (ISEGI‑UNL), Lisbon, Portugal, and the broad topics proposed to be addressed by ECIME 2010 included: evaluation topics; management topics; e‑Government topics; new technologies, innovation and infrastructures; development topics; ethics and philosophy topics; and general topics.

These topics where covered by the presentation in the conference of 47 Papers, 4  PhD Research Papers, and 4 Work in Progress with participants coming from 25 different countries splitted in the following streams: Managing Information; Evaluation of Records and Documents; Business Intelligence; ICT issues as they specifically affect SMEs; Logistics, Supply Chain and Process Improvement; Performance assessment and measurement; Web Tools; Health Information Systems; Evaluation Issues; Health Information Systems Issues; Quality and Service Level; and IS professionals.

The 13 ECIME 2010 selected papers for publishing in this EJISE special issue cover a very wide range of interesting and up to date research areas giving us important insights and new perspectives in future developments in the field and I hope it can became an important contribution to the dynamics in the information systems evaluation research area.

 

Keywords: action research, adopter categories, adoption, adoption determinants, alliances, architectural principles, BAN, business architecture, business value, CDSS, COBIT, community, computing, consumer goods, decision-making, diffusion of innovations (DOI) theory, digital divide, disadvantaged networks, early warning scorecard, eCommerce, enterprise architecture, evidence-based protocols, factors, GDS (Global Data Synchronization), geobrowser, georeference, GIS (Geographical Information System), GLN (Global Location Numbering), global standards, GoogleEarth, GTIN (Global Trade Items Numbering), GUSI (Global Upstream Supply Initiative), health informatics and body area networks, health information management, hospital information systems, information alignment, information management, information quality, information quality, information systems, information systems architecture, information technology, institutional theory, integrated suppliers, interorganizational systems (IOSs), interpretiv

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 19 Issue 3 / Dec 2016  pp135‑212

Editor: Shaun Pather

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Editorial

Shaun_Pather‑200 Professor Shaun Pather, based in the Faculty of Informatics & Design at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa, has spent more than 20 years teaching and researching in the field of ICT management.

His research has focused on the evaluation of Information Systems (IS) effectiveness, particularly within e‑Commerce, e‑Government and other web enabled contexts. He has developed models for evaluating e‑Commerce success, and also has an interest in the application of e‑Service Quality evaluation. Shaun has also extended his interest in IS evaluation into practical community engagement and Information Society issues, centered around societal upliftment facilitated by ICT’s. He has published in peer reviewed journals and has presented papers at several conferences. He has led several research projects with university and government partners in both the private and public sector. Professor Pather is also a Fulbright Scholar (University of Washington, 2009‑2010).

 

Keywords: Multi-channel, Electronic banking, Internet banking, Mobile banking, Technology Adoption, Grounded Theory, Design science, Design science research, evaluation, empirical validation, secondary analysis, primary data, business analysis, business architecture, parallelism, alignment, roles, responsibilities and organisational structure, Software Switching, Switching costs, Utilitarian Value, Hedonic Value, e-government, on-line tax filing, acceptance factors, personal innovativeness, computer self-efficacy, online trust, system quality, information system

 

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