The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Changing the Communication Culture of Distributed Teams ina World Where Communication is Neither Perfect nor Complete  pp187-196

Peter Weimann, Christian Hinz, Else Scott, Michael Pollock

© Oct 2010 Volume 13 Issue 2, ICIME 2010, Editor: Shaun Pather and Corrie Uys, pp97 - 196

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Abstract

Distributed teams have been set up to work together across space, time and even organisational boundaries over the last few years, to increase the availability of scarce skills, reduce travel costs, and increase worker job satisfaction through fewer relocations. This has been due to globalisation, shorter development cycles and scarce human expert resources placing additional pressure onto project teams. Technological developments, such as various communication technologies, have helped to support this move to distributed teams. These communication technologies, including phone and video conferencing, mobile technologies and the Internet, help team members handle project tasks in a distributed or virtual team project environment. This case study based paper provides an analysis of the communication culture and tools of the distributed teams of a large German manufacturer. The communication behaviours and tools used by these real distributed teams working together in different settings on international projects are analysed. The advantages and disadvantages of the distributed work setting and the different technologies used by the teams were gathered via a questionnaire and interviews with the leader and members of the different teams. The findings show that regular face‑to‑face meetings, email and phone still play a pivotal role in team communications, even though a variety of communication tools is available. The results also indicate that, like non‑distributed teams, a need for common ground and shared meaning, or social context, are essential elements for the communications within a distributed team. Face‑to‑face meetings are still important to create a common ground and shared meaning in distributed teams. The complexity of the tasks needed to be performed by the distributed team is also affected by this social context. Team members often complain about misuse of the different tools, as well as a lack of communication rules regarding the different communication tools. The case study shows that team member satisfaction and team success can only be accomplished if the communication culture in the company takes into account the technologies used and the distributed work setting.

 

Keywords: communications culture, virtual teams, communication technology, communication pattern, change management

 

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Journal Article

Implementing Electronic Health Information Systems in Local Community Settings: examining Individual and Organisational change experiences in the Philippines  pp187-198

Shainur Premji, Ann Casebeer, Richard E Scott

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp149 - 229

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Abstract

In this paper, we examine the implementation of an electronic health information system called the Community Health Information Tracking System (CHITS) in health centres in the Philippines. CHITS was created in 2005 to respond to a gap in population health decision‑making that developed when the Philippines government underwent health sector reforms in the 1990s, shifting resources and decision‑making authority from the national Department of Health to local governmental units at the municipal, provincial and regional levels. Two models ‑ Prochaska and Velicers Transtheoretical Model for Health Behaviour Change and Greenwood and Hinings Organisational Change Management Model ‑ were used to examine the transition from a paper to electronic environment and to assess processes and outcomes at the individual and organisational levels. Final results show both models adequately described the change management processes that occurred for health centre workers and health centres during implementation. However, neither model was developed to focus well on system and government level action and inaction. Our use of these frameworks was therefore unable to fully encapsulate the multiple organisational and political layers of change required in a highly decentralised environment; the health centre as an organisational entity was, and remains, highly dependent on decisions made by local governmental units … decision and policy‑makers at this level must undergo their own change management processes in order for the adoption of CHITS to proceed. We therefore see a series of processes required to proceed both concurrently and sequentially in order for change to occur and be sustained individually, organisationally and systemically. In particular, the role and power of government policy and decision‑making requires more deliberate attention when building our models and conducting our empirical enquiries.

 

Keywords: health information systems, evaluation, individual and organisational change management, e-health, decentralisation

 

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Journal Article

Use, Perception and Attitude of University Students Towards Facebook and Twitter  pp200-210

Kevin Johnston, Mei-Miao Chen, Magnus Hauman

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: As social computing systems persist over time, many elements such as user experience, perceptions, attitudes and interactions may change. Facebook and Twitter are two social computing systems that have become increasingly popular among universit y students. This research replicated previous studies by Lampe, Ellison and Steinfield (2008), and Johnston, Tanner, Lalla and Kawalski (2013) to assess how Facebook and Twitter use, perception and attitude have changed among university students. Beca use online social networks, social networking sites and micro‑blogging sites are relatively new as areas of academic research, there is limited research into the impacts of these social networking and micro‑blogging sites. A sample of 486 students from th e University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa completed a survey. The results were then compared to research data from previous studies by Lampe et al. (2008) and Johnston et al. (2013). The results showed that the percentage of students using Face book increased to 95%, Facebook daily usage and the number of Facebook friends doubled from previous surveys. This results also found that the South African students are more dependent on using Facebook, in comparison to using Twitter; that their percep tion of Facebook privacy has led to a decrease in personal information shared on Facebook as well as a change in audience perception. The data also shows that UCT students perceive friends and total strangers to be their main audiences on Twitter; the att itude of UCT students towards Facebook remained positive, on the other hand, a less positive attitude was experienced from the students using Twitter; and Facebook is a more popular method for communication between students. The results clearly highlight the changes in usage, attitude and perception of Facebook over time, and provide a starting point for assessing how usage and attitude to Twitter may change. The results also suggest that should therefore make use of social networking software such as Fac ebook and Twitter both in their personal lives, and in

 

Keywords: Keywords: Attitude, change, Facebook, perception, students, Twitter, use

 

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Journal Article

Building Persuasiveness into Information Systems  pp23-35

Marja Harjumaa, Salla Muuraiskangas

© Jul 2014 Volume 17 Issue 1, Special issue from ECIME 2013, Editor: Prof Przemyslaw Lech, pp1 - 121

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Abstract

Abstract: Often the purpose of personal health and well‑being systems is to change users behaviour. Many theoretical frameworks have been developed to support the design and evaluation of these persuasive systems for behaviour change, but their design re mains challenging. No systematic way yet exists by which to put the information into practice and build in persuasiveness effectively. The aim of this study is to investigate how the Persuasive Systems Design (PSD) model can be utilised so as to support the development of personal health and well‑being systems. To do this, the study discusses and analyses related research and also integrates the PSD model into the development of two health‑related behaviour change support systems. In Case 1, the purpose of using the PSD model was to identify new persuasive functionality within a fall risk assessment and fall prevention system. In Case 2, the purpose of using the PSD model was to identify new persuasive functionality and new service concepts within an ex isting smartphone application for mental wellbeing. The study shows that the PSD model has been used in the development of BCSSs to describe the overall process, analyse the persuasion context and design system qualities. It has also been applied in the e valuation of the existing systems by providing heuristics for expert evaluations and systematic ways to analyse user experience data. The study also reveals that the PSD model can be successfully applied during the user requirements analysis and concept d esign phases to identify new potential persuasive functionalities. In both Case 1 and 2, this resulted in having more variety in persuasive functionalities compared to those in the initial user requirements or existing application. The PSD model provides support for designing and evaluating BCSSs, but some future directions of development of the model can be recognised.

 

Keywords: Keywords: behaviour change support systems, persuasive systems design, design process, evaluation, framework, health, well-being

 

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Journal Article

Organizational Learning and ERP Systems in the post‑implementation phase: Where do we Stand? A Literature Review  pp120-129

Gunilla Myreteg

© Sep 2015 Volume 18 Issue 2, The special issue from ECIME 2014, Editor: Jan Devos, pp93 - 210

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Abstract

Abstract: ERP systems are today implemented in a great number of organizations. Research has invested much energy and time to make descriptions and recommendations regarding how the implementation should best be managed. The next step in practice as well as in research is how to continue to develop the business processes and ERP systems in order to take advantage of all their promises, and to refine how ERP systems are used in day‑to‑day activities. A starting point for the present study is that organizat ions today are characterized by strong external and internal pressure. In order to response to and deal with these, organizations strive to balance demands regarding stability and change. This implies that organizations put effort into designing and maint aining or changing practices, rules and routines. Within the general fields of organization theory and management accounting/control the ambition to create deliberate change is often conceptualized as processes of organizational learning (OL). This conc ept has also been used in the context of ERP systems. The research field is however heterogeneous and findings are scattered and inconsistent. There is a need for further development of our knowledge about the role of ERP systems in processes of organizat ional learning after the implementation phase. The present paper strives to consolidate and synthesize the current knowledge. The research question is to what extent and how do research conceptualize organizational learning and its interactions and involv ement with the ERP system? The paper is a literature review of research on OL in the context of ERP systems in the post‑implementation phase between the years 2005‑2015. A total number of 18 research articles were identified. The aim is to analyze and cla ssify previous research, and also to give suggestions for avenues suitable and fruitful for future research. The review compares and contrasts approaches in order to analyze similarities and dissimilarities and to investigate what topics or issues have be en addressed by previous research. The analysis shows that overall there is a lack of definitions and stringency in research on OL in an ERP systems context in the post‑implementation phase. The final section also forwards some suggestions for future rese arch.

 

Keywords: Keywords: ERP systems, organizational learning, stability, change, literature review

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 2 / Jul 2012  pp149‑229

Editor: Shaun Pather

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Keywords: information systems, service quality, SERVQUAL, service performance, service expectations, difference scores, user satisfaction, quality evaluations, Technical and Functional Quality Model, mobile telephony industry, factor analysis, health information systems, evaluation, individual and organisational change management, e-health, decentralisation

 

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