The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Towards a Model for Determining the Scope of ICT Integration in the Enterprise: the Case of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems  pp17-26

Fergal Carton, Frederic Adam

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

The question of integration of information systems (IS) into the planning and execution of operational activities has been the focus for researchers from different constituencies. Organisational theorists recognise the need for integrating mechanisms for co‑ordinating the actions of sub‑units within an organisation. Centralisation has been seen as a defensive reaction by organisations when placed under increasing external control , and also as a way to improve the efficiency of information processing, at least for routine tasks. In the meantime, researchers have been sceptical about the ability for structured information systems to deal with the complexity of the information flows within the organisation. Frameworks have also been identifying characteristics of the tasks themselves that have a bearing on the amount of information processing required. The real world is complex and moving, thus managers require flexibility in their interpretation of the mixed signals arising from this complexity. However, managers are working in environments where highly integrated information systems blur the distinction between what is real and what is virtual. There is a need for an integration approach allowing organisations to question which areas of activity are worth integrating, and conversely which areas are better left under local control. Where integrated, managers require processes for the maintenance of data integrity (people, tools, procedures). Based on field work involving two multi‑national manufacturing companies, this paper proposes a framework for ERP integration, which describes the evolution of functionality gaps as an ongoing and inevitable process that requires management.

 

Keywords: ERP, enterprise, integration, framework, complexity

 

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Journal Article

The Influence of Organisational Memory Mismatches and Coping Strategies on ERP Outcomes  pp165-176

Brian O'Donovan, Lisa seymour, Johannes Geldenhuys, Mogamat Isaacs, Kaziwe Kaulule

© Oct 2010 Volume 13 Issue 2, ICIME 2010, Editor: Shaun Pather and Corrie Uys, pp97 - 196

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Abstract

ERP systems are intended to encompass and integrate functions of an organisation resulting in organisational efficiencies. However, during the ERP usage stage these intended efficiencies are not always realised. One cause of this is organisational memory mismatches and the resultant coping strategies employed. Organisational memory can be described as the capability of organisations to retain and transmit information from past to future members and is evident in the persistence of organisational features after the implementation of ERP systems. Therefore to realise operational efficiencies, organisational memory mismatches between organisational memory and the ERP system need to be addressed. This is not possible without an understanding of the causes of mismatches and the subsequent coping strategies employed. To address this need, this paper presents an analysis of these mismatches, their causes as well as short‑ and long‑term coping strategies employed, and presents a resultant framework. This paper achieved its purpose through an interpretive case study of a large in‑use ERP system. The main data source was in‑depth interviews with users from 12 functional departments. The research identified causes of mismatches and the long and short‑term coping strategies adopted as a result of these mismatches. Mismatches and short‑term coping strategies were found to contribute to ERP underperformance. However, mismatches did not occur in isolation. Over time, coping strategies employed for one type of mismatch would result in another type of mismatch. In other cases coping strategies merely increased the mismatch. Only long‑term coping strategies rectified mismatches, contributing to ERP efficiency. The findings argue for providing sufficient resources for ongoing organisational capacity for customising and upgrading the system as well as for the training and support of end users. While previous research has focussed on identifying organisational memory mismatches, little research has been done on identifying the causes and the coping strategies. These findings will be useful for ERP implementation teams as well as organisations struggling to achieve organisational efficiencies with their ERP systems.

 

Keywords: ERP systems, organisational memory, ERP usage, ERP customising, ERP training, enterprise systems

 

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Journal Article

Evaluation of Content Management Systems (CMS): a Supply Analysis  pp9-22

Clara Benevolo, Serena Negri

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Content management systems (CMS) provide an optimal solution by organising information and, mostly, creating and managing an enterprise's knowledge. Nevertheless there is a big confusion about the functionalities that characterise CMS and about the differences with less performing products such as web content management systems, document and records management systems and enterprise content management systems. This paper aims to show the mismatches between companies' needs and those information management products, which are often called CMS even if they are not. For this reason the authors first make a theoretical comparison between the functionalities of CMS and those of the systems they are often confused with. Then they show the results of an empirical research on 22 products offered by international vendors. By using an original scheme, enterprises' needs in terms of information collection, management and publication and of knowledge management are compared with the functionalities of the aforementioned systems. The result consists of performing definitions for CMS and the other systems for managing information. Content Management products are analysed, compared and evaluated by using a special table created to point out the actual functionalities of the products offered on the market, despite vendors' declarations. Moreover the highlights are displayed in a matrix to evaluate the level of personalisation‑flexibility of the different products. The paper conclusions show how, on the demand side, companies' needs are growing in a confused framework; at the same time the supply side keeps on feeding this confusion, reducing company satisfaction in regard to knowledge and information management.

 

Keywords: Content management, web content management, enterprise content management, knowledge management, ICT supply and demand

 

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Journal Article

Information System Architecture Metrics: an Enterprise Engineering Evaluation Approach  pp91-122

André Vasconcelos, Pedro Sousa, José Tribolet

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Although some important technological developments have been achieved during last decade, information systems still do not answer efficiently enough to the continuous demands that organisations are facing — causing a non‑ alignment between business and information technologies (IT) and therefore reducing organisation competitive abilities. This paper proposes sixteen metrics for the Information System Architecture (ISA) evaluation, supported in an ISA modelling framework. The major goal of the metrics proposed is to assist the architect previewing the impact of hisher ISA design choices on the non‑functional qualities of the Enterprise Information System (EIS), ensuring EIS better align with business needs. The metrics proposed are based on the research accomplished by other authors, from the knowledge in other more mature areas and on the authors experience on real world ISA evaluation projects. The metrics proposed are applied to an e‑government project in order to support the definition of a suitable ISA for a set of business and technological requirements.

 

Keywords: Information system architecture metrics, information system architecture evaluation, enterprise information system, ceo framework, e-government project evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Enterprise Information Systems of new Generation  pp116-126

Elena Serova

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011, Editor: Walter Castelnovo and Elena Ferrari, pp1 - 148

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Abstract

In the today's rapidly changing competitive business environment, only flexible and dynamically developing companies are able to meet competition, companies that have managed to reduce costs and improve business efficiency through the introduction of adva

 

Keywords: enterprise information systems, enterprise recourse planning systems, customer relations management systems, supply chain management systems

 

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Journal Article

Reconstructing the Past for Organizational Accountability  pp127-137

Geert-Jan van Bussel

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011, Editor: Walter Castelnovo and Elena Ferrari, pp1 - 148

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Abstract

Many organizations have undergone substantial reorganization in the last decade. They re‑engineered their business processes and exchanged proprietary, not integrated applications for more standard solutions. Integration of structured data in relational d atabases has improved documentation of business transactions and increased data quality. But almost 90% of the information that organizations manage is unstructured, cannot easily be integrated into a traditional database. When used for organizational act ions and transactions, structured and unstructured information are records. They are meant and used as evidence. Governments, courts and other stakeholders are making increasing demands for the trustworthiness of records. An analysis of literature of the information, organization and archival sciences illustrates that accountability needs the reconstruction of the past. Hypothesis of this paper is that for the reconstruction of the past each organization needs a combination of three mechanisms: enterprise records management, organizational memory and records auditing. Enterprise records management ensures that records meet the quality requirements needed for accountability: integrity, authenticity, controllability and historicity. They ensure records that can be trusted and enhance the possibilities for the reconstruction of the past. The organizational memory ensures that trusted records are preserved for as long as is necessary to comply with accountability regulations. It provides an ICT infrastructure to (indefinitely) store those records and to keep them accessible. Records auditing researches the first two mentioned mechanisms to assess the possibility to reconstruct past organizational actions and transactions. These mechanisms ensure that organi zations have a documented understanding of [1] the processing of actions and transactions within business processes; [2] the dissemination of trusted records; [3] the way the organization accounts for the actions and transactions within its business proce sses; and [4] the reconstruction of actions and transactions from business processes over time. This understanding is crucial for the reconstruction of the past and for organizational accountability

 

Keywords: accountability, enterprise records management, organizational memory, records auditing

 

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Journal Article

A theoretical framework for exploring the influence of national culture on Web 2.0 adoption in corporate contexts  pp176-186

Andrew Barron, Dirk Schneckenberg

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp149 - 229

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Abstract

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to identify variables which help to explain cross‑country differences in adoption rates of Web 2.0 technologies in corporate contexts. The paper proposes a model which indicates how national cultural characteristics determine the evolution of Enterprise 2.0 business practices in different countries. The model is developed from a literature study, which combines insights on technology adoption, the Web 2.0 phenomenon and cross‑cultural management concepts. Based on this model, the paper assumes that Web 2.0 technologies may enjoy faster adoption rates in companies that operate in countries whose national cultures reject power distance, embrace collectivism, and accept uncertainty.

 

Keywords: Web 2.0, Enterprise 2.0, knowledge management, technology adoption, national culture

 

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Journal Article

A Delphi Examination of Inhibitors of The Effective use of Process Industry Enterprise Resource Planning (Erp) Systems: A Case Study of New Zealands Process Industry  pp116-133

Chidi Gerard Ononiwu

© Nov 2013 Volume 16 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp86 - 161

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Abstract

Abstract: An ERP System is among the core information system (IS) software being adopted in the process industries globally. Such systems are claimed to offer strategic and operational improvement to firms supply chain effectiveness. Prior studies have shown that most adopting firms are not achieving the strategic business value identified in the project justification due to employees ineffective use of the system. The gains that such firms have achieved by implementing ERP systems in terms of increas e in operational efficiency are often accompanied by daunting ineffective usability problems. Building on Technology…Organization…Environment (TOE) theory, Task‑Technology Fit (TTF) theory and the theory of usage inhibition, this study examines the in hibitors of the effective use of ERP systems. The study used the Delphi technique to draw from the experiences of a few ERP adopters from New Zealands process industries. Findings suggest that non‑collaborative training among employees, low absorptive ca pacity and system misfit are the top most critical inhibitors. Others inhibitors include inadequate ERP expertise, ERP default attributes, lack of continuous improvement and poor vendors support. The theoretical and practical implications of these findin gs are discussed in the concluding section.

 

Keywords: Keyword: Enterprise resource planning system, Effective use, Delphi methodology, Process

 

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