The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Citizen‑Centric Approach and Healthcare Management Based on the XML Web Services  pp179-186

Mayumi Hori, Masakazu Ohashi, Shotaro Suzuki

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

Citizen‑Centric Approach and Healthcare Management Based on the XML Web Services Mayumi Hori1, Masakazu Ohashi2 and Shotaro Suzuki3 1Hakuoh University, Tochigi, Japan 2Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan 3Microsoft Co Ltd. Tokyo, Japan m.hori@hakuoh.ac.jp ohashi@fps.chuo‑u.ac.jp shosuz@microsoft.com Abstract: We propose recommendations on how to improve healthcare management by utilizing the XML Web services, which enhance the quality and promote the efficiency of healthcare and medical services with a citizen‑centric, patient‑oriented approach.

 

Keywords: Citizen-centric, Patient-oriented, XML Web Services, Healthcare Management, Hub & Spoke, Collaborative Health.

 

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Journal Article

Post‑Implementation Evaluation of HealthCare Information Systems in Developing Countries  pp9-16

Hussein Al-Yaseen, Saheer Al-Jaghoub, Maher Al-Shorbaji, Maher SalimAl-Ahliyya Amman University, Amman, Jordan

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) project managers require accurate and reliable evaluation to allocate and control project resources. In addition, many private hospitals indicate that a number of their projects have failed; and between one and two thirds of ICT projects exceed their budget and time. Further, about half of the expensive ICT projects at the end will be considered out of control and cancelled. Justifying ICT investments is a long standing problem, and managers for the past decades have expressed concerns about the value they are getting from their investments, and they have been searching for ways to evaluate and justify these projects. Hence, evaluation of ICT is therefore becoming an important issue for both managers and practitioners. This paper aims to investigate the current practice of both types of evaluation: Prior Operational Use evaluation ‑POUe‑ and Operational Use evaluation ‑OUe‑ in Jordanian private hospitals to better understand what is required for the evaluation process and its associated benefits; secondly, to collect information about how hospitals carry out the evaluation process. In doing so, we attempts to answer specific questions, such as: How prevalent is POUe and OUe? What criteria are being used in both types of evaluation? What are their main benefits and uses of each type of evaluation? Results suggest that most decision makers do not place much importance on OUe of their IT/IS. Most managers tend to think of it only as a formality rather than a proper evaluation process. Without adopting a formal OUe the cost of future health informatics would seem likely to be less accurately estimated.

 

Keywords: healthcare information systems, health informatics, evaluation, developing countries, Jordan

 

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Journal Article

Reward Systems in the Post Digitization Era: Possible Benefits and Risks  pp51-58

Pontus Fryk

© Jan 2009 Volume 12 Issue 1, ECIME 2008, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 118

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Abstract

The last decades have been characterized by extremely intense digitization — in the shape of investments in administrative and embedded IT together with advanced Internet solutions — as regards companies and organizations worldwide. Today, however, most establishments are already highly digitized, which affects the conditions for work and organizations' forms and functions. Thus, based on an empirical investigation of the health care sector, this paper addresses the notion of the post digitization era through specifically examining IT‑based reward systems. This, of course, is not a novel phenomenon, but new ways of using the reward system concept — together with IT and original ideas — in order to increase efficiency, effectiveness, and productivity are considered. This, in turn, might have great implications concerning core strategies and the organization of work. In order to fulfill the paper's purpose of identifying possible benefits and risks associated with digital reward systems, especially in health care, a case study built on semi‑structured interviews was performed. The findings of this study indicate that there are several possible fields of innovative application — including both developments of existing solutions and potential future utilizations — concerning digital reward systems in health care. Moreover, in order for reward system implementations to be successful, organizations have to define, measure, valuate and evaluate input, output and performance appropriately, and the process of doing so is also affected by the present stage of digitization. This too is contemplated throughout the paper. Finally, important associated matters such as risk‑ reward trade‑offs and quantity versus quality are discussed. The results presented in this paper are based on a limited material. Still, they are valuable and original because of the empirical foundation derived from an important industrysector. Furthermore, they illustrate modern implications of reward systems in highly digitized contexts, and put forth novel views on possible fields of application of IT‑based reward systems, and associated potential benefits and risks.

 

Keywords: reward systems, post digitization, information technology, health care

 

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Journal Article

Modified Early Warning Scorecard: The Role of Data/Information Quality within the Decision Making Process  pp100-109

John O Donoghue, Tom O Kane, Joe Gallagher, Garry Courtney, Abdur Aftab, Aveline Casey, Javier Torres, Philip Angove

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Presented in this paper is the Patient Assessment‑Data Quality Model (PA‑DQM). It is designed to assess how patient datasets which are poor in composition can impact on the decision processes following patient assessment. The PA‑DQM in particular examin es four key Data Quality (DQ) dimensions: timeliness, accuracy, consistency and completeness. This DQ model is generic in nature as any number of decision making processes can be substituted to reflect the medical scenario under consideration. For examp le, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admissions, Emergency Room (ER) triage systems or Modified Early Warning Scorecards (MEWS). The PA‑DQM presented is evaluated using the MEWS process as an exemplar. Paper based MEWS are utilised to assist medical staff identify at risk patients with a declining health status. The calculated MEWS score is designed to trigger earlier medical interventions to avoid or reduce the potential impact of catastrophic events. In particular the existing MEWS system which (i.e. a paper based approach) is evaluated alongside an electronic‑Modified Early Warning Scorecard (e‑MEWS) system, which is designed and developed to reduce the number of DQ issues which continue to persist with the paper based process. To validate the asse rtions presented in this paper a workshop (participation of 51 medical staff) was held in St. Lukes Hospital, Kilkenny, Ireland, where the paper based MEWS has been adopted for the last 3 years. It is clear from our initial findings that the proposed e ‑MEWS system has the ability to greatly enhance the levels of DQ over its existing paper based counterpart.

 

Keywords: Information Quality, MEWS, Health Informatics and Body Area Networks.

 

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Journal Article

Evaluation of New Information Technologies Exposure on Knowledge Retention Regarding Benefits of Physical Activity on Health Status  pp122-133

Paulo Pinheiro, Dulce Esteves, Rui Bras

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Physical inactivity is an important risk factor in several highly prevalent diseases, being associated with worse quality of life and higher mortality. Despite the implementation of a several global, national and local policy instruments and strategies to promote physical activity (PA), including Internet platforms and advertising campaign, approximately two thirds of the European adult population reports low adherence to an active lifestyle, impairing health benefits that exercise can provide. Increasing efforts to provide adequate information have been made, and the use of new technologies tools has increased, but little investigation focus on the effect of information exposure on knowledge retention, regarding effects of physical inactivity in health. The objective of the present study is to evaluate differences among people in the use of new information technologies as information source on PA, regarding their perceptions of benefits of an active lifestyle and characteristics of adequate physical activity to health improvement. The study included a randomly recruited sample of 879 subjects (53% males; 47% females), age 42.3±19.4 years old. A survey was designed to (1) identify main information sources; (2) relate perceived knowledge and PA information sources; (3) relate knowledge retention on adequate PA for health benefits and PA information sources; (4) relate perceived necessity of more information regarding PA and information sources and (5) relate PA levels and information sources. Results show that two information sources (teacher and sport professionals) positively influence perception of proper PA information. Results also found teachers, Internet and sport professionals as PA information sources that most influence their users, regarding Knowledge retention. We also found that rely on friends/family; teachers, Internet and sport professionals as PA information sources positively influence the adoption of an active lifestyle.

 

Keywords: e-health, information technologies exposure, knowledge retention

 

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Journal Article

The SIGLIC System for Improving the Access to Surgery in Portugal  pp160-166

Pedro Gomes, Luis Velez Lapao

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

This paper describes the design and first results of an information system (SIGLIC) that supports the new integrated management program (SIGA) to improve the access to surgery in Portugal. SIGIC, the Ministry of Health’s agency responsible for access to surgery management, started re‑thinking the system in 2005 by re‑defining key processes and workflows. The designed information system SIGLIC integrates all hospitals with surgery with every other hospital, where it picks the data to allow the search for optimal solutions for each patient. In the context of SIGIC (Waiting List for Surgery's Integrated Management System) “access” means to assure the treatment by services in terms of quality, standards, equity, process and transparency. The existence of a significant number of patients waiting for treatment that exceed the clinical acceptable times has ominous consequences not only for the individuals (increasing suffering, reduce treatment success, more complex treatments) but also for the society (more expensive use of resources, higher absenteeism, etc), which made the government to create SIGIC program. SIGIC's goals are to reduce waiting time for surgery, to apply identical standards to all patients, to profit from good use of resources and, to create a national structure of homogeneous information based in a system of data collection. The methodology followed was to: a) “survey of information systems and technology in Demand/Supply/Resources”; b) “institutionalization and monitoring of procedural standards for management of the Waiting List for Surgery (WLS)”, c) provide “evaluation by results” and, d) “Correction of deviations to the standard”. To fulfill SIGIC’s objectives it was created a management model (SIGA) and SIGLIC to support it. By now 57 public hospitals and 96 private clinics and hospitals (with convention in SIGIC) had joined the SIGIC network. The Information model include the following items: information on patients and events to allow “Process management”, “clinical information” for “Disease Management” and “financial data” to allow management between the health units, from which data is gathered to improve access management. The information is recorded by hospitals in accordance with a set of standards and integrated into the central database of SIGIC. The quality of integrated information from the hospitals is guaranteed by a set of tools to validate its consistency, rejecting non‑compliant data. The information is recorded in hospitals throughout the process of managing the patient on WLS and integrated daily in the central database. The results since 2005 show the importance of an integrated information system to overcome the bureaucracy: There was a 36% improvement in number of scheduled surgical episodes and 60% reduction in days on waiting time.

 

Keywords: waiting list for surgery, information systems, organizational processes, health information management

 

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Journal Article

Implementing Electronic Health Information Systems in Local Community Settings: examining Individual and Organisational change experiences in the Philippines  pp187-198

Shainur Premji, Ann Casebeer, Richard E Scott

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp149 - 229

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Abstract

In this paper, we examine the implementation of an electronic health information system called the Community Health Information Tracking System (CHITS) in health centres in the Philippines. CHITS was created in 2005 to respond to a gap in population health decision‑making that developed when the Philippines government underwent health sector reforms in the 1990s, shifting resources and decision‑making authority from the national Department of Health to local governmental units at the municipal, provincial and regional levels. Two models ‑ Prochaska and Velicers Transtheoretical Model for Health Behaviour Change and Greenwood and Hinings Organisational Change Management Model ‑ were used to examine the transition from a paper to electronic environment and to assess processes and outcomes at the individual and organisational levels. Final results show both models adequately described the change management processes that occurred for health centre workers and health centres during implementation. However, neither model was developed to focus well on system and government level action and inaction. Our use of these frameworks was therefore unable to fully encapsulate the multiple organisational and political layers of change required in a highly decentralised environment; the health centre as an organisational entity was, and remains, highly dependent on decisions made by local governmental units … decision and policy‑makers at this level must undergo their own change management processes in order for the adoption of CHITS to proceed. We therefore see a series of processes required to proceed both concurrently and sequentially in order for change to occur and be sustained individually, organisationally and systemically. In particular, the role and power of government policy and decision‑making requires more deliberate attention when building our models and conducting our empirical enquiries.

 

Keywords: health information systems, evaluation, individual and organisational change management, e-health, decentralisation

 

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Journal Article

Building Persuasiveness into Information Systems  pp23-35

Marja Harjumaa, Salla Muuraiskangas

© Jul 2014 Volume 17 Issue 1, Special issue from ECIME 2013, Editor: Prof Przemyslaw Lech, pp1 - 121

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Abstract

Abstract: Often the purpose of personal health and well‑being systems is to change users behaviour. Many theoretical frameworks have been developed to support the design and evaluation of these persuasive systems for behaviour change, but their design re mains challenging. No systematic way yet exists by which to put the information into practice and build in persuasiveness effectively. The aim of this study is to investigate how the Persuasive Systems Design (PSD) model can be utilised so as to support the development of personal health and well‑being systems. To do this, the study discusses and analyses related research and also integrates the PSD model into the development of two health‑related behaviour change support systems. In Case 1, the purpose of using the PSD model was to identify new persuasive functionality within a fall risk assessment and fall prevention system. In Case 2, the purpose of using the PSD model was to identify new persuasive functionality and new service concepts within an ex isting smartphone application for mental wellbeing. The study shows that the PSD model has been used in the development of BCSSs to describe the overall process, analyse the persuasion context and design system qualities. It has also been applied in the e valuation of the existing systems by providing heuristics for expert evaluations and systematic ways to analyse user experience data. The study also reveals that the PSD model can be successfully applied during the user requirements analysis and concept d esign phases to identify new potential persuasive functionalities. In both Case 1 and 2, this resulted in having more variety in persuasive functionalities compared to those in the initial user requirements or existing application. The PSD model provides support for designing and evaluating BCSSs, but some future directions of development of the model can be recognised.

 

Keywords: Keywords: behaviour change support systems, persuasive systems design, design process, evaluation, framework, health, well-being

 

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