The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Evaluating Success in Post‑Merger IS Integration: A Case Study  pp143-150

Maria Alaranta

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

Despite the importance of post‑merger IS integration to the success of the whole merger, post‑merger IS inte‑ gration literature remains scarce. This paper attempts to synthesise the often implicit or vague definitions of post‑merger IS integration success with those provided in the vast body of literature on IS evaluation. As a result, four categories of success issues for post‑merger IS integration are proposed: User satisfaction with the integrated software's system and information quality as well as its use; Efficient and effective IS integration management; Efficient IS staff integration; and IS ability to support the underlying motives of the merger.

 

Keywords: IS Integration, Mergers, Acquisitions, M&A, Success, IS Evaluation

 

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Journal Article

The Effect of Information Systems on Firm Performance and Profitability Using a Case‑Study Approach  pp11-16

Mojisola Olugbode, Ibrahim Elbeltagi, Matthew Simmons, Tom Biss

© Mar 2008 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 51

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Abstract

Beale and Cole is a company that was experiencing significant levels of growth in its business. However, its existing operational practices and ICT infrastructure were incapable of efficiently sustaining their level of growth. A thorough analysis of the operational systems was carried out covering both the manual systems and those supported by its computerised accounting system. A number of beneficial changes were made, including the implementation of a major new business system replacing the old accounting system. In all these developments, the work of a teaching company associate, now known as knowledge transfer partnerships associate supported the analysis, but the full participation and support of all key personnel within the company was essential. Although there were problems during the implementation, these have being resolved and Beale and Cole now has a fully supported and integrated IT system which will maintain their competitive advantage and facilitate their continued growth and profitability.

 

Keywords: information, communication and technology, ICT, business systems integration, SMEs

 

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Journal Article

Important Issues for Evaluating Inter‑Organizational Data Integration Configurations  pp127-138

Frank G. Goethals

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

Partnering companies can share data via various configurations. Typically problems become evident as partnering companies seek to exchange data. These problems take a different form for different data integration configurations and are thus of great relevance when evaluating different configurations. This paper identifies issues to be taken into account when evaluating inter‑organizational data integration configurations. Eight problems are discussed: difficulties to identify which information flows to automate; to relate different viewpoints on boundary objects; to agree on data formats; to distribute investments among the parties; to deliver appropriate service levels; to preserve the value of the data sharing; to clarify data ownership and to do all of this in the frame of changing relationships. For several problems it is illustrated how they surface in a completely centralized and in a completely decentralized inter‑ organizational data‑integration scenario.

 

Keywords: business-to-business integration, inter-organizational data integration problems, boundary objects, service levels, data ownership, data functionality

 

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Journal Article

Towards a Model for Determining the Scope of ICT Integration in the Enterprise: the Case of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems  pp17-26

Fergal Carton, Frederic Adam

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

The question of integration of information systems (IS) into the planning and execution of operational activities has been the focus for researchers from different constituencies. Organisational theorists recognise the need for integrating mechanisms for co‑ordinating the actions of sub‑units within an organisation. Centralisation has been seen as a defensive reaction by organisations when placed under increasing external control , and also as a way to improve the efficiency of information processing, at least for routine tasks. In the meantime, researchers have been sceptical about the ability for structured information systems to deal with the complexity of the information flows within the organisation. Frameworks have also been identifying characteristics of the tasks themselves that have a bearing on the amount of information processing required. The real world is complex and moving, thus managers require flexibility in their interpretation of the mixed signals arising from this complexity. However, managers are working in environments where highly integrated information systems blur the distinction between what is real and what is virtual. There is a need for an integration approach allowing organisations to question which areas of activity are worth integrating, and conversely which areas are better left under local control. Where integrated, managers require processes for the maintenance of data integrity (people, tools, procedures). Based on field work involving two multi‑national manufacturing companies, this paper proposes a framework for ERP integration, which describes the evolution of functionality gaps as an ongoing and inevitable process that requires management.

 

Keywords: ERP, enterprise, integration, framework, complexity

 

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Journal Article

Supply Chain Information Alignment in the Consumer Goods and Retail Industry: Global Standards and Best Practices  pp134-149

Virgil Popa, Mircea Duica

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

The Global Commerce Initiative (GCI) established the Global Upstream Supply Initiative (GUSI) in order to provide a standard framework for consumer goods manufacturers and their suppliers of ingredients, raw materials and packaging to better integrate across a number of supply chain processes. Without Internal Data Alignment, for example, Global Data Synchronization (GDS) will definitely not improve business performance and will, in fact, magnify the negative impact of poor quality data. What’s more, collaborative initiatives such as those included in Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) and Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) will not be economically deployable on a wide scale without the consistently accurate and available information that will result from an Internal Data Alignment program. GDS is based on a global network of data pools, or electronic catalogues, which are all inter‑operable and compliant with the same business requirements and standards. Interoperability means that a manufacturer can publish a product and partner data on one single Data Pool without having to worry about the fact that customers may select different Data Pools to access the data. Integrated Suppliers is a concept for improving the part of supply chain between manufacturers and the tiers of suppliers of ingredients, raw materials and packaging. By sharing information both parties are able to exercise judgment on costs, quantities and timing of deliveries and productions in order to stream line the production flow and to move to a collaborative relationship. GUSI underlined the long term policy on the use of Standards as a key success factor to achieve upstream e‑supply integration. Before exchanging information, partners must agree on product identification. This is a part of the data alignment step defined by GUSI. The UIM (Upstream Integration Model) offers common business processes and data interchanges to support interoperability between manufacturers and suppliers.

 

Keywords: Global Standards, Information Alignment, Consumer Goods, GLN, Global Location Numbering, GTIN, Global Trade Items Numbering, GDS, Global Data Synchronization, Integrated Suppliers, UIM, Upstream Integration Model, GUSI, Global Upstream Supply Initiative

 

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Journal Article

The Status of Integration of Health Information Systems in Namibia  pp61-75

Nomusa Dlodlo, Suama Hamunyela

© Nov 2017 Volume 20 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp59 - 141

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Abstract

The acquisition of health information systems (HIS) by the Ministry of Health and Social Services (MoHSS) in Namibia has been uncoordinated, thereby resulting in fragmented silo systems and a lot of duplication of functionality across departments. Integration of ISs is required to provide consistent information support throughout the health sector. The aim of this paper is to assess the level of integration of IS in the Namibian health sector. The question therefore would be, “What is the current level of integration of HIS in the Namibian health sector and what are the factors that influence their level of integration” The study adopts a qualitative research strategy through a case study of MoHSS departments. The case study research design was selected to focus on three MoHSS Electronic Records Management (ERM) systems, the DHIS2, EPI INFO and eHealth. A critical analysis of related IS integration literature was conducted, which fed into interview questions on the status of HIS integration in Namibia. Three categories of semi‑structured interviews were performed – one with the information technology (IT) experts, one with the systems users who are the nurses and the doctors and the last with health policy experts. The interviewees were expected to have worked in one of the Ministry’s departments for at least 3 years. The interview sample consisted of four systems analysts, two systems administrators, two computer technicians, one intern, two doctors, 30 nurses and 1 Deputy Director of IT. Interviews were recorded and later transcribed for data analysis. The conclusion reached by this research was that although efforts have been initiated towards the integration of HIS in Namibia, a lot of ground is yet to be covered.

 

Keywords: health information systems, information systems integration, interoperability

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special / Nov 2005  pp143‑230

Editor: Dan Remenyi

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Keywords: IS integration, Mergers, Acquisitions, M&A, Success, IS evaluation, Evaluation framework, Web-based aptitude test, User acceptance, DART approach, IT value, Strategic value, Technology value, Strategy, Innovation, Failure-prone decision process, IS business value, IS evaluation project, Citizen-centric, Patient-oriented, XML web services, Healthcare management, Hub and spoke, Collaborative health, Evaluation, e-Prescription, Interdisciplinary research, Software process innovations, Organisation learning, Adoption, Individual learning styles, Computer capital, Complementary effects, Productivity, Software, Productive efficiency, Perfomance metrics, Balanced scorecard, Causality, Performance manager, Accounting, ERP implementation, IT investments, Business value, Investment quality

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 2 / Nov 2006  pp45‑104

Editor: Dan Remenyi

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Editorial

Once again we have received an interesting range of research papers from authors around the world and furthermore they continue to represent a very wide range of thought with regards to the different applications of evaluation thinking for information and communication technology. It is clear that this field has not yet produced a clear consensus as to any particular methodology and I for one believe that this is what one might loosely call a “good thing”.

Six papers have been selected by our reviewers through the process or double‑blind peer review and this has produced six very interesting and yet different papers from authors in Sweden, Spain, The Netherlands, Ireland and Greece.

I trust readers will find these pieces of research as interesting as I have.

 

Keywords: IS integration, activity-based costing, assessment, business evaluation, cost management systems, e-business, e-commerce, enterprise modelling, evaluation framework, event study methodology, information systems effectiveness, information systems management, information systems quality, information technology productivity paradox, internet business, IS success, IT investment, process capability, project portfolio, risk management, software process maturity, system analysis metrics, value-at-risk, web-facilitated business

 

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