The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Adoption and Evaluation of Mobile Commerce in Chile  pp75-88

Ranjan B. Kini

© Jan 2009 Volume 12 Issue 1, ECIME 2008, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 118

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Abstract

Chile is recognized as the most wired or the most e‑Ready country in South America and in the top quartile globally. Chile has the highest penetration of cell phones in South America, yet it has been slow in adopting mobile commerce. In this exploratory research, both electronic and mobile commerce adoption in Chile are studied. The survey questions are developed based on the previous studies on mobile commerce adoption. The results show that the group studied uses electronic commerce extensively but is not comfortable using mobile commerce, and complain than mobile access speed, service quality and price needs improvement.

 

Keywords: mobile commerce, mcommerce adoption, mobile commerce in Chile, electronic commerce in Chile

 

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Journal Article

Framework for Mobile Payments Integration  pp14-25

Fergal Carton, Jonas Hedman, Denis Dennehy, Jan Damsgaard, Kay-Ti Tan, J. B. McCarthy

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011, Editor: Walter Castelnovo and Elena Ferrari, pp1 - 148

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Abstract

This paper derives a theoretical framework for consideration of both the technologically driven dimensions of mobile payment solutions, and the associated value proposition for customers. Banks promote traditional payment instruments whose value proposition is the management of risk for both consumers and merchants. These instruments are centralised, costly and lack decision support functionality. The ubiquity of the mobile phone has provided a decentralised platform for managing payment processes in a new way, but the value proposition for customers has yet to be elaborated clearly. This inertia has stalled the design of sustainable revenue models for a mobile payments ecosystem. Merchants and consumers in the meantime are being seduced by the convenience of on‑line and mobile payment solutions. Adopting the purchase and payment process as the unit of analysis, the current mobile payment landscape is reviewed with respect to the creation and consumption of customer value. From this analysis, a framework is derived juxtaposing customer value, related to what is being paid for, with payment integration, related to how payments are being made. The framework provides a theoretical and practical basis for considering the contribution of mobile technologies to the payment industry. The framework is then used to describe the components of a mobile payments pilot project being run on a trial population of 250 students on a campus in Ireland. In this manner, weaknesses in the value proposition for consumers and merchants were highlighted. Limitations of the framework as a research tool are also discussed.

 

Keywords: payments, framework, mobile, value

 

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Journal Article

Confirmatory factor analysis of service quality dimensions within mobile telephony industry in Ghana  pp199-217

Simon Gyasi Nimako, Foresight Kofi Azumah, Francis Donkor, Veronica Adu-Brobbey

© Jul 2012 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp149 - 229

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Abstract

Due to the increasing importance and investment in modern information systems (IS) technologies, the evaluation of service quality (SQ) in information system environments has attracted significant attention and debate in the literature. Much effort ha s been made by scholars and practitioners to use IS service quality criteria and dimensions in different industry contexts. Not much attention has been devoted to using other SQ model criteria and dimensions to evaluate information systems in the mobile t elephony industry (MTI) context. This study fills the gap, and contributes to the body of knowledge in the area SQ in the MTI environment. This paper, which was a part of a larger study, sought to empirically validate SQ dimensions that are relevant to the mobile telephony industry in Ghana. It used Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to detect the underlying latent variables that significantly determine SQ in Ghanas MTI. 1000 customers were sampled from four mobile telecom operators in Ghana in a cro ss‑sectional survey that used a self‑administered structured questionnaire for data collection. The findings indicate that four emerged SQ dimensions relevant to Ghanas MTI were labelled as: Customer relations, Image, Tangibles and Real network quality. Cronbach alpha reliability for all items indicated a high value of 0.918. Service providers could conveniently use the derived instrument items for measuring service quality in Ghana Mobile Telephony industry. It concludes that aside the popular SERVQUAL, alternative SQ models model, like one conceptualised in this study, could be useful in determining SQ dimensions relevant to MTI. Limitations and directions for research are discussed.

 

Keywords: Service quality, SERVQUAL model, Technical and Functional Quality Model, mobile telephony industry, factor analysis.

 

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Journal Article

Towards a Theory of Multi‑Channel Banking Adoption amongst Consumers  pp137-157

Kunal Patel, Irwin Brown

© Dec 2016 Volume 19 Issue 3, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp135 - 212

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Abstract

Abstract: Multi‑channel retail banking is a novel banking approach, one which encompasses traditional banking approaches as well as modern Internet‑based banking innovations. The main objective of the study is to investigate the factors that influence the choice and adoption of a particular banking channel, from amongst available options. This study is conducted within an interpretivist paradigm under the guidance of an inductive grounded theory approach. The purpose of this combination is to allow for the exploration of the phenomenon through the use of semi‑structured interviews to gather data from individuals who have bank accounts. The gathered data was analysed employing the techniques available through grounded theory methodology. The theory reveals that prior to using a particular banking channel for a specific transaction, consumers sub‑consciously or consciously perform an evaluation of available and known channels, and then make a choice. Various factors influence this choice, such as comparative advantages of one channel over another, compatibility with personal preferences and the transaction being performed, and the time and place. After usage, consumers assess the satisfaction of the banking experience before deciding whether to continue using a certain channel for a specific transaction, or choosing an alternative.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Multi-channel, Electronic banking, Internet banking, Mobile banking, Technology Adoption, Grounded Theory

 

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Journal Article

Mobile Access to Information Systems in law Enforcement: An Evaluation of its Implications for Data Quality  pp143-152

Rachael Lindsay, Thomas Jackson, Louise Cooke

© Oct 2010 Volume 13 Issue 2, ICIME 2010, Editor: Shaun Pather and Corrie Uys, pp97 - 196

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Abstract

A recent UK government initiative enables police officers to input information directly into policing information systems via mobile devices. However, the impact and implications on data quality have not been assessed. The events of 9/11 and the Soham murders in the UK in 2002 may reflect high profile incidents of failure in information management practice within police forces that have amplified the need to scrutinise the monitoring of data quality. The tragedy of the Soham murders was partly caused by poor quality information regarding the offender, Ian Huntley, being held on disparate information systems. Consequently, intelligence and information held on people must be fully accurate, and therefore data quality plays a pivotal role. Despite the apparent severe impact of poor data quality on organisational effectiveness and decision‑making, previous research appears to have addressed these issues only within non‑policing sectors. The paper investigates what measures are used to monitor data quality via an empirical study within a UK police force, the Leicestershire Constabulary. It also evaluates the design of the interface of the crime‑input form and the impact this has on inputting quality information into the crime recording system, along with the implications of this for modern‑day law enforcement. Measurement of data quality was investigated by mapping aspects of the data quality monitoring process identified via qualitative data from semi‑structured interviews against the key attributes of data quality derived from a literature review. The design of the crime‑recording interface was evaluated via a series of focus groups with operational users of mobile technology prior to and following implementation of mobile devices. The research found that there are some processes in place to check that data follows specific standards, such as the recording of dates of birth. However, these processes only take into consideration the structural completeness of data, and other measurements of data quality, such as accuracy, timeliness, relevance, understandability and consistency are not considered. It also found that the existing interface is inefficient for a mobile environment, as there are numerous free‑text fields and duplication of data entry caused by a lack of system integration. The paper contributes to the existing small body of knowledge on data quality within a mobile policing environment. This knowledge can be applied by other law enforcement organisations looking to provide mobile access to their information and knowledge environment without reducing the level of data quality as a result of direct input of information.

 

Keywords: mobile working, law enforcement, evaluation, data quality interface design

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 13 Issue 2, ICIME 2010 / Oct 2010  pp97‑196

Editor: Shaun Pather, Corrie Uys

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Editorial

We have pleasure in presenting this special issue of EJISE.  As Information and Communications Technologies and the related Information Systems become ever more pervasive across all spheres of business, government and community based organizations, the scope of this journal has flexed to accommodate these varied settings in which pertinent research problems are located.   Consequently, in this special issue wide‑ranging problems related to the broad ambit of IS evaluation is reported on: 

As many countries continue to develop policies to enhance and sustain the growth of the SME sector, so too does the expenditure and consumption of IT amongst this category of business grow at an ever increasing rate thus warranting the attention of evaluation research. Avraam Papastathopoulos and Christina Beneki investigate an important concern with regards to the factors which are associated with the benefits from the adoption of ICTs amongst SMEs. In a study of the Greek SME sector the paper provides evidence that strategy plays a major role in the adoption and the appropriate use of ICTs.  Importantly their research also finds that prior entrepreneurial experience‑knowledge of ICT is significantly associated with the ICT performance. 

RFID technologies are increasingly used in a number of organisational settings for inventory control and management. Paul Golding and Vanesa Tennant contribute to our understanding of evaluation by proposing a methodology to evaluate the RFID inventory reader in a library.  Whilst the findings of this paper hone in on the application of RFID in a specific environment, the findings provide a basis for which evaluation of RFID in other similar contexts can take place, and thus adds to the conceptual base on RFID performance testing.

Notwithstanding many years of case studies and an increasing body of literature on ERP implementation and evaluation thereof questions continue to arise in respect of successful outcomes.  Brian O’Donovan and his co‑authors argue that during the ERP usage stage the intended efficiencies from ERP systems are not always realised. Having studied organisational memory mismatches and the resultant coping strategies their research posits that mismatches and short‑term coping strategies were found to contribute to ERP underperformance. 

In their paper Peter Weimann and co authors investigate the role of communications culture in a distributed team environment.  In assessing the role of ICTs in such an environment the paper argues that team member satisfaction and team success can only be accomplished if the communication culture in the company takes into account the technologies used and the distributed work setting. 

From amongst the various IS evaluation approaches, those apporaches which focus on the role of human stakeholders  are  worthy of a deeper understanding. Jeffrey Bagraim examines the multiple commitments of information technology knowledge workers and the related outcomes of such commitment. The results of his study challenges managers to review their assumptions about the organizational commitments of information technology knowledge workers.

Web 2.0 applications also receive attention in this issue.  Hooper and Evans investigate the value congruence of social networking services in New Zealand, and make an assessment of ethical information handling.  Their findings demonstrate significant shortcomings in the contractual relationships between the users and social networking services and they argue that this could be exploited in order to misuse personally identifiable data.

The paper by Racheal Lindsay and co‑authors discusses measures which are used to monitor data quality in the context of mobile devices in the UK police force.  Their findings show that whilst there are processes in place to verify data standards, these processes only take into consideration the structural completeness of data, and not other measurements of data quality, such as accuracy, timeliness, relevance, understandability and consistency.

Robbert in't Hout and coauthors studied how a wiki could be used to improve knowledge sharing.  The paper reports on a case study in which a consulting company was able to improve knowledge sharing amongst consultants during the devleopment of a Municipal Traffic and Transport Plan.  The findings  suggest that wikis need to be tuned to the learning styles that are available within the community that will use the tool.  In the context of knowledge sharing impolrtant lessons for wiki design are offered.

Finally, in a study of e‑government adoption, Rangarirai Matavire and co‑authors report on factors which inhibit the successful implementation of e‑government in South Africa. The findings of their research demonstrate that leadership, project fragmentation, perceived value of Information Technology, citizen inclusion and task co‑ordination are among the key inhibitors of e‑government success.

Shaun Pather and Corrie Uys

South Africa, October 2010

 

Keywords: affective commitment, boosting behaviour, communication culture, communication pattern, communication technology, data quality, e-Government, enterprise systems, entrepreneurial experience, ERP customising, ERP systems, ERP training, ERP usage, evaluation, grounded theory, helping behaviour, ICT-adoption, ICT-performance, ICT-strategy, interface design , knowledge management , law enforcement, library, mobile working, Municipal Traffic and Transport Planning, New Zealand Privacy Act 1993, ordinal regression, organisational memory, performance , personal security, personally identifiable information, privacy policies, RFID, social networking services , social software, South Africa, turnover intentions, value congruence, virtual teams, Wiki

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011 / Jan 2012  pp1‑148

Editor: Walter Castelnovo, Elena Ferrari

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Editorial

The papers in this issue of EJISE have been selected from those presented at the 5th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation (ECIME 2011) at the Dipartimento di Informatica e Comunicazione, Università dell'Insubria, Como, Italy on 8‑9 September 2011.

 

The issue has been guest edited bythe Conference Chair, Professor Walter Castelnovo, and the Programme Chair, Professor Elena Ferrari, both from University of Insubria, Como, Italy.

 

walter_castelnovo    elena_ferrari 

 

Keywords: crime analysis, GIS, geostatistics, intelligence-led policing, predictive dissemination, data mining, boundary spanning, IS outsourcing, relationships management, accountability, enterprise records management, organizational memory, records auditing, knowledge economy, measuring effectiveness, performance indicator, assess of knowledge, enterprise information systems, enterprise recourse planning systems, customer relations management systems, supply chain management systems, community informatics, requirements engineering, microenterprise, technology adoption, indigenous business, socio-technical system, SMEs, IT/IS, lemon market theory, ISV, ambient assisted living, field trials, ageing technology users, enterprise architecture, architectural alignment, Zachman framework, TOGAF, GERAM, E2AF, payments, framework, mobile, value, data governance, data management, data quality, framework, business model, business case, strategy, operations, management, implementation

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 2 / Jul 2012  pp149‑229

Editor: Shaun Pather

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Keywords: information systems, service quality, SERVQUAL, service performance, service expectations, difference scores, user satisfaction, quality evaluations, Technical and Functional Quality Model, mobile telephony industry, factor analysis, health information systems, evaluation, individual and organisational change management, e-health, decentralisation

 

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