The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

An Interactive and Iterative Evaluation Approach for Creating Collaborative Learning Environments  pp83-92

Anita Mirijamdotter, Mary M. Somerville, Marita Holst

© Nov 2006 Volume 9 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp45 - 104

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Abstract

Inspired by a three‑year Creative University 'arena' initiative at Luleå University of Technology in Sweden, an international team of faculty researchers conducted an exploratory study in 2005, which aimed to investigate the efficacy of an interactive design and evaluation process for technology‑enabled collaborative learning environments. This applied research approach was designed as a collaborative evaluation process for co‑creation of technology‑enabled, learning‑ focused physical and virtual 'learning commons.' Faculty researchers from Sweden and the United States used Soft Systems Methodology tools, including the Process for Organisational Meanings (POM) model, to guide sixty‑two students' participatory co‑design and evaluation activities. In this paper, the POM evaluation model is explained and related to the Japanese concept Ba. Application of the models is illustrated within the context of student learning through boundary crossing information exchange and knowledge creation. As evidenced in their iterative and interactive evaluative recommendations, students' learning outcomes included development of improved capabilities for identifying socio‑technical elements of distributed learning environments, suggesting that student beneficiaries can successfully reflect upon their experiences and provide valuable evaluation insights. In addition, when this evaluation is iterative, students' insights into project management, software needs, and services design can improve their technology‑enabled learning experiences. Concluding comments explore the efficacy of the POM model implementation for guiding other learning‑focused, user‑centric initiatives, which aim to promote interdisciplinary, or boundary crossing, exchanges concurrent with advancing team‑based knowledge creation proficiencies among project participants.

 

Keywords: interactive formative evaluation, learning commons, soft systems methodology, process for organisational meanings, POM, model, Ba, higher education pedagogy

 

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Journal Article

Using the Probabilistic Model Checker PRISM to Analyze Credit Card Use  pp35-44

Amani El Rayes, Mevliyar Er

© Mar 2008 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 51

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Abstract

Probabilistic model checking is a recent extension of traditional model‑checking techniques for the integrated analysis of both apply probabilistic model checking to study the effect of credit card companies on people's lives. We use the probabilistic model checking tool PRISM as the formal framework. This approach allows us to obtain performance measures on various policies. It allows us to obtain performance measures on various policies such as changes in the interest rate and its effect on the credit card loan entitlement of the card user, the effect of different repayment policies on the user's spending ability in the short and long run, the effect of different interest rates and different spending preferences on the loan in the short run, and the effect of different spending preferences and different repayment policies on the remaining balance in the long run. From the study we investigate the level of loans and the amount of instalments after which the card holder goes through a cycle of interest repayment only. That is heshe can not use the card to withdraw money any more but has to make interest payments on the debt.

 

Keywords: credit card system, performability, probabilistic model checking, simulation

 

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Journal Article

The Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM): an Alternative View to Information Systems Project Measurement  pp185-200

Corlane Barclay, Kweku-Muata Osei-Bryson

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

The information systems (IS) project management profession has been faced with numerous socio‑technical challenges. As part of its analysis, research has expressed discontent with the traditional measures used to assess the success or failure of these projects, i.e. conformance to time, schedule and specification requirements espoused by the project management (PM) standard bodies. Despite this, research has also revealed that industry continues to place high reliance on this approach in determining the outcome of their projects. These developments imply, in part, a misalignment between research and practice and a scarcity of appropriate measurement tools that are aligned to the realities of different project contexts. The research presents a Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM) that attempts to address some of these concerns through the development of project measures that are aligned to key project stakeholders' values and objectives within the unique project contexts. It is argued that objectives are the key performance criteria of the project hence measures must be aligned to these criteria and formal procedures should be in place to assure that these objectives and measures are carefully developed and reflective of the persons to which the project matters, the stakeholders. The POMM is grounded on several principles of the Value Focused Thinking (VFT) and Goal Question Metric (GQM) techniques. The evaluation of the proposed model was performed in two parts: a team of industry experts examined the principles of model and provided feedback on its practicability to practice, and a case study of a Caribbean educational institution's IS graduate programme development was used to illustrate the procedures of the model. The research provides theoretical and practical implications for IS evaluation particularly within the project management and performance measurement domains. The research aims to extend the debate on suitable evaluation methods for IS projects while providing project practitioners with an alternative approach that can enhance their decision making processes during the life of the project.

 

Keywords: IS project, project objectives measurement model, POMM, success criteria, IS project management, Caribbean

 

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Journal Article

The Patient Data Analysis Information System: Addressing Data and Information Quality Issues  pp95-108

David Sammon, Kieran A. O'Connor, John Leo

© Jan 2009 Volume 12 Issue 1, ECIME 2008, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 118

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Abstract

This paper reports on the development and initial end‑user evaluation (after ten months in‑use) of a Patient Data Analysis Information System (PDA‑IS) for Geriatric Medicine. The development and evaluation is the first phase of a larger ongoing research project. The PDA‑IS contains a set of high integrity patient data records (a local practice‑based repository of clinical patient data) available for the Consultant Physician in Geriatric Medicine. The evaluation of the system identifies the wide range of benefits that were realised by the Consultant Physician and indeed could be expected in the future from the deployment and extension of such a flexible solution for all Consultant Physicians in hospital practice that need to collect patient data.

 

Keywords: geriatric medicine, patient-centric data, data integrity, relational data model, n-tier architecture, evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Supply Chain Information Alignment in the Consumer Goods and Retail Industry: Global Standards and Best Practices  pp134-149

Virgil Popa, Mircea Duica

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

The Global Commerce Initiative (GCI) established the Global Upstream Supply Initiative (GUSI) in order to provide a standard framework for consumer goods manufacturers and their suppliers of ingredients, raw materials and packaging to better integrate across a number of supply chain processes. Without Internal Data Alignment, for example, Global Data Synchronization (GDS) will definitely not improve business performance and will, in fact, magnify the negative impact of poor quality data. What’s more, collaborative initiatives such as those included in Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) and Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) will not be economically deployable on a wide scale without the consistently accurate and available information that will result from an Internal Data Alignment program. GDS is based on a global network of data pools, or electronic catalogues, which are all inter‑operable and compliant with the same business requirements and standards. Interoperability means that a manufacturer can publish a product and partner data on one single Data Pool without having to worry about the fact that customers may select different Data Pools to access the data. Integrated Suppliers is a concept for improving the part of supply chain between manufacturers and the tiers of suppliers of ingredients, raw materials and packaging. By sharing information both parties are able to exercise judgment on costs, quantities and timing of deliveries and productions in order to stream line the production flow and to move to a collaborative relationship. GUSI underlined the long term policy on the use of Standards as a key success factor to achieve upstream e‑supply integration. Before exchanging information, partners must agree on product identification. This is a part of the data alignment step defined by GUSI. The UIM (Upstream Integration Model) offers common business processes and data interchanges to support interoperability between manufacturers and suppliers.

 

Keywords: Global Standards, Information Alignment, Consumer Goods, GLN, Global Location Numbering, GTIN, Global Trade Items Numbering, GDS, Global Data Synchronization, Integrated Suppliers, UIM, Upstream Integration Model, GUSI, Global Upstream Supply Initiative

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating Information Systems according to Stakeholders: a pragmatic perspective and method  pp73-88

Jenny Lagsten

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

In the last decade several researchers have addressed the problem that there does not seem to be much evidence of extensive use of interpretive evaluation approaches in practice. Researchers have though recognized the interpretive evaluation approach as well founded academically and theoretically offering potential advantages such as stakeholder commitment and learning opportunities. One reason for this non‑use could be that there are few, if any, interpretive evaluation methods ready at hand for evaluators in practice. An interpretive IS evaluation method means a method in support for doing evaluation as interpretation. This research presents a practical method for doing evaluation of information systems as a joint act of interpretation performed by the stakeholders of the information system in use. In our research we have expanded the interpretive philosophical base to embrace a pragmatic knowledge interest in order to underpin the overall strive for evaluation that is to contribute to change and betterment. The method presented is named VISU (Swedish acronym for IS evaluation for workpractice development). The process of evaluating accordingly to the VISU method has been extensively tested in practice and in theoretical grounding processes and is now considered ready for wider use. The research process for developing VISU has been conducted with canonical action research through parallel work with evaluation and method development in six episodes within two cases. VISU consists of prescribed actions that are anchored in a set of underlying principles stemming from the philosophy of American pragmatism. Evaluation according to VISU is performed in three phases; arrange, evaluate and develop. In the paper VISU is described according to phases, actions, main concepts and principles. The use of VISU is demonstrated through examples from a performed evaluation of an information system in support for social welfare services.

 

Keywords: IS evaluation, stakeholder model, interpretive IS evaluation method, pragmatism, action research

 

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Journal Article

Medical Records System Adoption in European Hospitals  pp89-99

Ana Marques, Tiago Oliveira, Sara Simoes Dias, Maria Fraga O. Martins

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Health Care system has had an ongoing focus on improving access to and quality of care, and more recently on cost reduction. The primary mean to achieve these goals has been to change health care policy, as exemplified by the adoption of health information technology in particular the adoption of patient centred information, characterized by the ability to manage comprehensive patience information such as: medical records; appointments scheduling; theatre management and ward reporting. Different terms are used to refer to these systems including the most common: electronic patient record; electronic medical record; computer based patient record and medical records system (MRS). Despite the importance of these systems in health care, little is known about the adoption. This study addresses the existent research gap by analyzing the adoption of MRS in European hospitals. Study data source is the e‑Business W@tch 2006 decision maker survey, covering 448 hospitals in the European Union. Additional information related to country wealth indicators, was extracted from the EU official statistics and opinion polls website. Variable choice is based on a derivation from the recently introduced framework know as Human, Organization and Technology fit (HOT‑fit) and Technology, Organization and Environment (TOE) framework. Adding the environmental context into the HOT‑fit framework, the Human, Organization, Technology and Environment (HOTE) framework is derivate. HOTE framework identifies four contexts that influence information and communication technologies (ICT) adoption: Technology characteristics including equipment but also processes; Organizational context as size, localization and even managerial structure; Human context relating to ‘User Involvement’; and Environmental context that incorporate the cultural environment of the country and regulatory influence. In order to reduce the number of variables available, a factor analysis (FA) is performed, using the principal component technique with varimax rotation. Three eigen‑value, greater than one are extracted, explaining 69.68% of the variance contained in the data. The three contexts found are: country wealth, competition and technology readiness. To determine the correlation between HOTE framework characteristics and MRS adoption a Logit model is used. For that were used variables obtained from the FA and other variables such as hospital size, education level and research level, gathered directly from the e‑business watch survey. MRS adoption is significantly associated with Education Level, Technology Readiness and Country Wealth. Since MRS adoption may be an organization survival strategy for hospitals to improve quality and efficiency while reducing costs, hospitals that are at risk of missing the wave of implementation should be offered incentives that enable them to implement and maintain patient centred information systems.

 

Keywords: ICT adoption, e-Business, HOTE framework, Hospitals, Factor Analysis, Logit model.

 

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Journal Article

The Relation Between Dynamic Business Models and Business Cases  pp138-148

Bart-Jan van Putten, Markus Schief

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011, Editor: Walter Castelnovo and Elena Ferrari, pp1 - 148

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Abstract

This paper analyses the relation between two well‑known business concepts. It clarifies how business models, as an implementation of a companys strategy, can be aligned with business cases, as an abstraction of a companys operations. The relations are a nalyzed from a static as well as a dynamic point of view by means of inductive reasoning and literature review. Based on the understanding of the relations, a continuous business model‑business case alignment approach is proposed. Further, managerial guid elines are presented supporting the approach. Finally, two software tools, business case framework and business model composer, are presented indicating how the proposed conceptual alignment could be implemented. This paper contributes to research and pra ctice. Both can benefit from the conceptual relation between two well‑known concepts that have hardly been linked so far. Practitioners can apply the proposed alignment approach and the managerial guidelines to review their business. For research, we cont ribute to the body of knowledge of business model concepts. Researchers can build upon this fruitful ground by validating the proposed concept in empirical settings or by implementing software solutions supporting this approach. Consequently, the agility of companies can be increased when implementing merged or changed business models in the organization and when using business cases to determine if it is time to change the business model.

 

Keywords: business model, business case, strategy, operations, management, implementation

 

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