The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Modelling Risks in ISIT Projects through Causal and Cognitive Mapping  pp1-10

Abdullah J. Al-Shehab, Robert T. Hughes, Graham Winstanley

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

Software systems development and implementation have become more difficult with the rapid introduction of new technology and the increasing complexity of the marketplace. This paper proposes an evaluation framework for identifying the causes of shortfalls in implemented information system projects. This framework has been developed during a longitudinal case study of a problematic project, which is described.

 

Keywords: causal and cognitive mapping, project evaluation, information systems project risk

 

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Journal Article

Using Value‑at‑Risk for ISIT Project and Portfolio Appraisal and Risk Management  pp1-6

Stefan Koch

© Mar 2006 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 43

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Abstract

This paper makes the case for adopting a risk measure from the finance sector for ISIT project and portfolio evaluation. The proposed value‑at‑risk approach constitutes a well‑tested approach in high‑risk environments, especially banking, and reports the expected maximum loss (or worst loss) over a target horizon within a given confidence interval. Value‑at‑risk is computed using either an analytical, parametric approach, or resorting to simulation, either based on historical samples or Monte Carlo methods. The main advantages of using value‑at‑risk measures are that they are methodologically consistent with modern ISIT evaluation approaches like real options, that they offer possibilities for management and assessment of ISIT project portfolios, and that the results are easy to interpret.

 

Keywords: IT investment, risk management, value-at-risk, project portfolio

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating the Evaluations: Preconceptions of Project Post‑Mortems  pp65-72

John McAvoy

© Nov 2006 Volume 9 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp45 - 104

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Abstract

For future projects to improve, it is necessary to evaluate the lessons from previous projects. The majority of software methodologies recommend a review of the project to evaluate what worked and what needs improvement. These reviews are commonly referred to as project post‑mortems. Existing research into post‑mortems has found problems with the actual process itself and the use of the output from the process — the lessons learned. This research examines project post‑mortems before the post‑mortem has occurred — it is an examination of the beliefs and attitudes that project members bring with them into post‑mortems. These attitudes can ultimately cause the failure of a post‑ mortem, even before it has begun. It is somewhat paradoxical that team members initially espoused positive views about post‑mortems in a survey, yet further examination of key informants showed that these espoused views did not translate into reality. It is shown how hierarchical groupthink can help to forge negative beliefs and attitudes about post‑mortems that will have a detrimental affect on the process itself.

 

Keywords: project evaluation, hierarchical groupthink, project post-mortem, espoused theory

 

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Journal Article

The Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM): an Alternative View to Information Systems Project Measurement  pp185-200

Corlane Barclay, Kweku-Muata Osei-Bryson

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

The information systems (IS) project management profession has been faced with numerous socio‑technical challenges. As part of its analysis, research has expressed discontent with the traditional measures used to assess the success or failure of these projects, i.e. conformance to time, schedule and specification requirements espoused by the project management (PM) standard bodies. Despite this, research has also revealed that industry continues to place high reliance on this approach in determining the outcome of their projects. These developments imply, in part, a misalignment between research and practice and a scarcity of appropriate measurement tools that are aligned to the realities of different project contexts. The research presents a Project Objectives Measurement Model (POMM) that attempts to address some of these concerns through the development of project measures that are aligned to key project stakeholders' values and objectives within the unique project contexts. It is argued that objectives are the key performance criteria of the project hence measures must be aligned to these criteria and formal procedures should be in place to assure that these objectives and measures are carefully developed and reflective of the persons to which the project matters, the stakeholders. The POMM is grounded on several principles of the Value Focused Thinking (VFT) and Goal Question Metric (GQM) techniques. The evaluation of the proposed model was performed in two parts: a team of industry experts examined the principles of model and provided feedback on its practicability to practice, and a case study of a Caribbean educational institution's IS graduate programme development was used to illustrate the procedures of the model. The research provides theoretical and practical implications for IS evaluation particularly within the project management and performance measurement domains. The research aims to extend the debate on suitable evaluation methods for IS projects while providing project practitioners with an alternative approach that can enhance their decision making processes during the life of the project.

 

Keywords: IS project, project objectives measurement model, POMM, success criteria, IS project management, Caribbean

 

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Journal Article

Economic Desirability and Traceability of Complex Products  pp201-212

Mordechai Ben-Menachem, Ilanit Gavious

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

The real values and benefits of Information Technologies are difficult to quantify and frequently even to identify accurately. Existing financial models such as Net Present Value have proven insufficient for complex products, for long‑ term corporate goals. IS projects and software‑rich products are decided upon while ignoring critical financial aspects, as the distance between the corporate product vision and the reality that engineers see may be very large. This paper maps between economics vis‑à‑vis IS‑based product management via an inter‑disciplinary approach, looking at the needs and exigencies of corporate management, IS project, products and software engineering. The basis for the article is a discussion of the difficulties in evaluation of the economic desirability of complex, software‑ rich products. It presents a dynamic corporate‑level model for economic profit evaluation designed to deal with the unique characteristics of such products, over many variants and versions, and the entire lifecycle. Given the extreme uncertainty of costs, benefits, risks and timeframes projections, the model facilitates real time reporting via an information system designed for management of Products, Portfolios and Projects. Whereas existing project management techniques such as Earned Value Management provide a general basis for managing project level activity, our model provides a longer‑term view to assess economic affects of corporate strategies over time. This is provided by a dynamic, Management Information System based aggregation of all product information, over an entire product lifecycle, with the objective to provide a knowledge base for corporate dynamic decision‑making. Concomitantly, the model fulfils Sarbanes‑Oxley Act of 2002 requirements for management assertion traceability of valid and accurate measures. These aspects co‑joined, from Sarbanes‑Oxley, back through multiple products, over myriad versions, and through automated requirements, design and testing tools, all combine to form an auditable management feedback loop that can be leveraged at multiple corporate management levels. The paper represents a significant step towards quality product decision‑making via a model that is meaningful, while also useful as it is leveraged through an automated tool set.

 

Keywords: economic profit, information systems, IS management, IS evaluation, product management, project management, traceability

 

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Journal Article

Information System Architecture Metrics: an Enterprise Engineering Evaluation Approach  pp91-122

André Vasconcelos, Pedro Sousa, José Tribolet

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Although some important technological developments have been achieved during last decade, information systems still do not answer efficiently enough to the continuous demands that organisations are facing — causing a non‑ alignment between business and information technologies (IT) and therefore reducing organisation competitive abilities. This paper proposes sixteen metrics for the Information System Architecture (ISA) evaluation, supported in an ISA modelling framework. The major goal of the metrics proposed is to assist the architect previewing the impact of hisher ISA design choices on the non‑functional qualities of the Enterprise Information System (EIS), ensuring EIS better align with business needs. The metrics proposed are based on the research accomplished by other authors, from the knowledge in other more mature areas and on the authors experience on real world ISA evaluation projects. The metrics proposed are applied to an e‑government project in order to support the definition of a suitable ISA for a set of business and technological requirements.

 

Keywords: Information system architecture metrics, information system architecture evaluation, enterprise information system, ceo framework, e-government project evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Enterprise System Implementation from the Functional Consultants’ Perspective  pp36-46

Przemysław Lech

© Jul 2014 Volume 17 Issue 1, Special issue from ECIME 2013, Editor: Prof Przemyslaw Lech, pp1 - 121

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Abstract

Abstract: Although Enterprise System (ES) implementation (formerly Enterprise Resource Planning systems) literature is extremely broad, most of it takes the perspective of the implementing organisation and its employees, i.e., project managers, key users and users. The fact that it is both possible and popular to conduct such a complicated, time‑consuming and expensive project using functional consultants is largely omitted. This study explores the Enterprise System implementation project from the perspective of the functional consultants and is based on the analysis of project documentation and interviews. The research questions answered by this study include the consultants’ requirements from other project participants, which help them to accomplish the goals of each project phase, to complete the activities performed in each project phase, and to deliver the products that are requested of them.

 

Keywords: Keywords: enterprise systems, ERP, implementation, project, consultants

 

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Journal Article

IT Project Selection: Politics, Experience and good Friends  pp55-70

Keld Pedersen

© Mar 2016 Volume 19 Issue 1, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

Abstract: Selecting the right IT projects is increasingly important for many organizations. Project portfolio managers play a key role during project selection, but even though they have a great impact on the selection process, we have little knowledge ab out how they decide which projects to recommend for initiation. Most of the research on project selection is normative, suggesting new methods, but available empirical studies indicate that many methods are seldom used in practice. This paper addresses th e issue by providing increased understanding of IT project selection practice, thereby facilitating the development of methods that better fit current practice. The study is based on naturalistic decision‑making theory and interviews with experienced proj ect portfolio managers who, when selecting projects, primarily rely on political skills, experience and personal networks rather than on formal IT project‑selection methods, and these findings point to new areas for developing new methodological support f or IT project selection.

 

Keywords: Keywords: IT project selection, IT project justification, IT project portfolio management

 

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