The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Improving Usability Outcomes for each of the Usability Practitioner Roles  pp173-187

Vince Bruno, Martin Dick

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper examines two sets of usability roles: the consultant vs the organisation based practitioner and the usability manager vs. the usability practitioner. This paper will review the current literature discussion of the usability practition ers role and present findings from interviews with industry practitioners. This research interviewed twenty one usability practitioners with five or more years industry experience. The interview transcripts were then analysed using the grounded theory m ethodology. The analysis provided various findings which highlighted concepts that impacted on the usability outcome of an IS project. The analysis produced twenty seven concepts which were formed into four themes, which included usability mindset, collab orative approach, usability practice and project constraints. The findings present and describe eleven of these concepts in some detail. The concepts presented are directly related conclusions discussed. This paper will focus on the noticeable differences between the various usability roles in relation to the resulting twenty seven concepts. The key findings show that usability managers look to strategic usability issues, by improving stakeholder collaboration and need to focusing on the skillsets of the usability practitioners. Consultants had a higher tendency to focus on usability activities compliance within a process, selecting and performing activities based on constraints (which include technological constraints, time and budget constraints), nee ded to have a degree of flexibility in their usability practice and often were used to validate usability practices in an organisation. Organisational practitioners were more focused on nurturing and educating usability understanding within the organisati on and stakeholders involved in an IS project. A usability practitioner needs to be flexible enough to adapt to the situation they find themselves in when engaged in an IS project in order to maximise usability outcomes.

 

Keywords: Keywords: usability, practitioner, role, industry, usability outcome

 

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Journal Article

The Role and Requisite Competencies of the Public Sector CIO: a Two‑sided Perspective  pp188-199

Val Hooper, Beverley Bunker

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: A considerable body of research exists on the role, and desired capabilities and competencies of the CIO. However, most of these studies have been executed in large, private sector organizations. It seems that the challenges faced by public sect or CIOs are often very different to those in the private sector, and this might place different requirements on them in terms of knowledge and competence, as well as the roles they fulfil. To date, there has been little exploration into such requirements in public entities. To address this gap, exploratory research was conducted into the role and competency expectations of CIOs in the public sector, and into the impact of the public sector context. A dyadic approach, involving both CIOs and their business colleagues, was adopted in order to gain more meaningful insights. Semi‑structured interviews were conducted with both the CIO and the head of their main internal businessŽ partner of 17 local government organizations. The findings indicate that the CIO s and their business partners differ significantly in their views of required competencies. The business partners require a business knowledge and focus similar to theirs, and most manifest scant regard for the technical expertise necessary or the technic al requirements of the organization. IT is there to support them. The government environment often places more onerous constraints on CIOs than in the private sector, especially so in terms of reporting level; the ability to influence strategy; decision m aking flexibility; and resourcing. The findings from this research extend the application of the RBV and also provide greater understanding of the competencies and roles of the CIO. It also provides insights for recruiters of public service IT professiona ls and CIOs, human resources managers, as well as for providers of training programmes.

 

Keywords: Keywords: CIO, competency, knowledge, role, public sector, dyadic approach

 

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Journal Article

Role of Information Systems for Strategic Agility in Supply Chain Setting: Telecommunication Industry Study  pp100-112

Nicholas Blessing Mavengere

© Jul 2014 Volume 17 Issue 1, Special issue from ECIME 2013, Editor: Prof Przemyslaw Lech, pp1 - 121

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Abstract

Abstract: The ability of a company to either adapt to the changes in the business environment or to influence the environment, for example by innovations, determines its success in gaining competitive advantage or even survival in the contemporary busines s environment. Both scholars and practitioners are constantly devising ways to survive the environmental pressures, such as, information overload, technological advances and obsolescence and globalization. This research proposes strategic agility comprise d of strategic sensitivity, strategic response and collective capabilities as one such business virtue required. One such competitive and complex industry is Telecommunication industry and this study makes use of a company in that industry to investigate strategic agility and information systems (IS) role in promoting strategic agility. In addition, the supply chain setting is considered because of its significance in the industry as one of the competitive factors. The research revealed different point s of view for the role of IS from business and information technology (IT) managers. The value of strategic agility is appreciated by both sets of managers. However, the managers have different views on the value of IS in promoting the strategic agility dimensions, for instance, most business managers highlighted that IS is of no strategic value and one even claimed it is the worst performing function. But IS managers noted that, IS, for instance, business intelligence and enterprise resource planning s ystems could be utilized hand‑in‑hand to support strategic agility. Moreover, this study make use of dynamic capabilities view in drawing both strategic agility dimensions and IS input. This study contributes to the ever required knowledge on how busines s could make use of IS and adapt organizational features to the environment requirements in order to survive the competition.

 

Keywords: Keywords: strategic agility, strategic sensitivity, strategic response, collective capabilities, Information systems role, supply chain, telecommunication study

 

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Journal Article

The overlapping nature of Business Analysis and Business Architecture: what we need to know  pp169-179

Tiko Iyamu, Monica Nehemia-Maletzky, Irja Shaanika

© Dec 2016 Volume 19 Issue 3, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp135 - 212

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Abstract

Abstract: The concepts of business architecture and business analysis have many things in common. The commonalities bring beneficiary synergy to the organisations that employ both concepts. However, they also impose challenges, such as how they align, integrate or complement each other within an organisation. Also, some of the challenges lead to confusion, disorientation and defragmentation of processes and activities in many organisations where both concepts are employed in parallel. The challenges get even worse as they increasingly continue to impact structures in some organisations, which happen through allocation of roles and responsibilities between business analysis and business architecture units. Thus, the parallelism of both concepts raises fundamental question ‑ whether the business analysis and business architecture are roles or titles. This confusion manifests itself into power struggle and selective accountability of practical unconsciousness, as actors exert their mandates and authority within an organisation. These challenges and confusion happens at different levels, and does affect the organisation’s performances. This article examines, discusses and highlights the distinction between the business analysis and business architecture, from the perspective of the computing environment. The article reveals differentiation, functionalism and serviceability as some of the critical factors, which influence the challenges and confusion that are posed by the concepts’ parallelism. Also examined are the implications of parallelism, which both concepts bring into an organisational environment. The findings from the study are intended to reduce negative impacts that the confusion and challenges do unconsciously and in practice have on processes and activities in organisations that employs both concepts in parallel.

 

Keywords: Keywords: business analysis, business architecture, parallelism, alignment, roles, responsibilities and organisational structure

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 19 Issue 3 / Dec 2016  pp135‑212

Editor: Shaun Pather

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Editorial

Shaun_Pather‑200 Professor Shaun Pather, based in the Faculty of Informatics & Design at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa, has spent more than 20 years teaching and researching in the field of ICT management.

His research has focused on the evaluation of Information Systems (IS) effectiveness, particularly within e‑Commerce, e‑Government and other web enabled contexts. He has developed models for evaluating e‑Commerce success, and also has an interest in the application of e‑Service Quality evaluation. Shaun has also extended his interest in IS evaluation into practical community engagement and Information Society issues, centered around societal upliftment facilitated by ICT’s. He has published in peer reviewed journals and has presented papers at several conferences. He has led several research projects with university and government partners in both the private and public sector. Professor Pather is also a Fulbright Scholar (University of Washington, 2009‑2010).

 

Keywords: Multi-channel, Electronic banking, Internet banking, Mobile banking, Technology Adoption, Grounded Theory, Design science, Design science research, evaluation, empirical validation, secondary analysis, primary data, business analysis, business architecture, parallelism, alignment, roles, responsibilities and organisational structure, Software Switching, Switching costs, Utilitarian Value, Hedonic Value, e-government, on-line tax filing, acceptance factors, personal innovativeness, computer self-efficacy, online trust, system quality, information system

 

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