The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Outsourced Information Systems Failures in SMEs: a Multiple Case Study  pp73-82

Jan Devos, Hendrik Van Landeghem, Dirk Deschoolmeester

© Jun 2008 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp51 - 108

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Abstract

Since the 1980s, a number of frameworks have been proposed for understanding the concept of information system (IS) failure. Two approaches to IS failures seem particularly important: the concept of Expectation Failure and the concept of Termination Failure. We argue that there is an extra dimension to the problem that is not covered by those descriptive models, which we call the Outsourced IS Failure (OISF). To explain the OISF we draw on agency theory, which views the problems that occur in outsourced environments as the results of three factors: goal differences, risk behaviour differences and information asymmetry. Although the (positivistic) agency theory has already been used to describe phenomena of failure in IT relations there is still a lack of empirical evidence. This paper brings the results of the attempts of falsification of the agency theory in situations of OISF. A positivistic case study research was conducted based on multiple cases in SMEs. The choice for qualitative research is based on the accessibility of well documented secondary data in litigation files of failed IS projects. Eight cases of IS project failures subject to litigation were selected. We conclude that the agency theory has strong prediction and explanation power for OISF. However some adjustments are needed to the agency theory. The theory seems to work in two ways, opportunistic behaviour is also observed on the side of the principal. The findings indicate that lack of trust is a prominent determinant for failure.

 

Keywords: IS outsourcing, SMEs, IS failures, Principal Agent theory, Organisational and Personal Trust

 

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Journal Article

An Evaluation of the Theory of Planned Behaviour in Consumer Acceptance of Online Video and Television Services  pp141-150

Yann Truong

© Feb 2010 Volume 12 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp129 - 198

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Abstract

This study aimed at evaluating the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) model in predicting user acceptance of online video services. Few studies have applied the TPB model within this context, even though the model has proven to be effective in predicting technology adoption. Validating the TPB model would improve the understanding of both academics and practitioners of the most influential antecedents of user acceptance. Past studies have demonstrated the importance of integrating user needs and behaviour as a requirement for building successful user‑centric online services. Structural equation modelling was used as the main statistical procedure for data analysis. The results of the study confirmed that the TPB model was viable in predicting user acceptance of online video services. The findings also revealed that perceived behavioural control was the highest contributor to predicting intention to use online video services. Attitude toward use and subjective norm were found to have moderate predictive power, mostly because online video services present obvious benefits to users and are consumed privately.

 

Keywords: technology adoption, online video, online television, web TV, Theory of Planned Behaviour, user acceptance of online videos

 

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Journal Article

Literature Review of Information Technology Adoption Models at Firm Level  pp110-121

Tiago Oliveira, Maria Fraga Martins

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Today, information technology (IT) is universally regarded as an essential tool in enhancing the competitiveness of the economy of a country. There is consensus that IT has significant effects on the productivity of firms. These effects will only be realized if, and when, IT are widely spread and used. It is essential to understand the determinants of IT adoption. Consequently it is necessary to know the theoretical models. There are few reviews in the literature about the comparison of IT adoption models at the individual level, and to the best of our knowledge there are even fewer at the firm level. This review will fill this gap. In this study, we review theories for adoption models at the firm level used in information systems literature and discuss two prominent models: diffusion on innovation (DOI) theory, and the technology, organization, and environment (TOE) framework. The DOI found that individual characteristics, internal characteristics of organizational structure, and external characteristics of the organization are important antecedents to organizational innovativeness. The TOE framework identifies three aspects of an enterprise's context that influence the process by which it adopts and implements a technological innovation: technological context, organizational context, and environmental context. We made a thorough analysis of the TOE framework, analysing the studies that used only this theory and the studies that combine the TOE framework with other theories such as: DOI, institutional theory, and the Iacovou, Benbasat, and Dexter model. The institutional theory helps us to understand the factors that influence the adoption of interorganizational systems (IOSs); it postulates that mimetic, coercive, and normative institutional pressures existing in an institutionalized environment may influence the organization’s predisposition toward an IT‑based interorganizational system. The Iacovou, Benbasat, and Dexter model, analyses IOSs characteristics that influence firms to adopt IT innovations. It is based on three contexts: perceived benefits, organizational readiness, and external pressure. The analysis of these models takes into account the empirical literature, and the difference between independent and dependent variables. The paper also makes recommendations for future research.

 

Keywords: information technology, diffusion of innovations, DOI, theory, technology-organization-environment, TOE, framework, interorganizational systems, IOSs, institutional theory

 

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Journal Article

SMEs and IT: Evidence for a Market for “Lemons”  pp26-35

Jan Devos, Hendrik Van Landeghem, Dirk Deschoolmeester

© Jan 2012 Volume 15 Issue 1, ECIME 2011, Editor: Walter Castelnovo and Elena Ferrari, pp1 - 148

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Abstract

It is well known that Small‑ and Medium‑sized Enterprises (SME) suffer from a lack of IT proficiency and therefore depend heavily on external IT expertise. The acquisition of a strategic IT artefact by an SME is mainly initiated in a market where Independ

 

Keywords: SMEs, IT/IS, lemon market theory, ISV

 

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Journal Article

Acceptable and Unacceptable Behaviour on Social Networking Sites: A Study of the Behavioural Norms of Youth on Facebook  pp259-268

Val Hooper, Tarika Kalidas

© Nov 2012 Volume 15 Issue 3, ICIME, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp230 - 287

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Abstract

SNS offer many benefits, especially for the youth who are striving to establish their identity as young adults. The youth are the most active users of SNS but are also the biggest perpetrators of behaviour that would not be tolerated offline. Although differences between these two environments have been identified, the link between the underlying behavioural norms and what is regarded as acceptable and unacceptable behaviour online has not been comprehensively explored – even less so how that behaviour is determined. Given the gap in the knowledge and the prevalence of use by the youth, the objectives of this research were to determine: (1) what behaviour is regarded as acceptable/unacceptable on SNS, (2) how that is determined, and (3) whether there are differences between online behavioural norms and those that apply to offline behaviour. Guided by social cognitive theory, qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 youth aged 18‑20 years who had Facebook accounts. Findings indicate there is greater clarity on what is unacceptable behaviour than what is acceptable. Personal behavioural norms appear to guide determination of unacceptable behaviour whereas the lead of others’ indicates acceptable behaviour. Acceptable behaviour appears to be more audience dependent than unacceptable behaviour, and there sre strong indications of herding behaviour with regard to determination of acceptable norms. The lack of clarity regarding acceptable online behavioural norms is distinctly different from the offline environment. The “protection” that the computer screen provides also contributes to the differences between offline and online behaviour. The distinction between types of friends that exists offline is emphasized online because users usually have one Facebook page that serves all audiences as opposed to encountering different groups separately as is the case offline. Online there is also the obligation to befriend people one normally would avoid offline.

 

Keywords: Keywords/Phrases: Social networking sites, behavioural norms, youth, herding behaviour, mimetic theory, Facebook

 

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Journal Article

Do IS consultants enhance IS competences in SMEs?  pp14-25

Adrian Bradshaw, Paul Cragg, Venkat Pulakanam

© Jun 2013 Volume 16 Issue 1, ECIME 2012, Editor: Dr. David Sammon and Dr. Tadhg Nagle, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

Abstract: Many small and medium‑sized enterprises (SMEs) turn to consultants for assistance with IS projects, for example, to help the firm select and implement a new system. Prior studies have shown that consultants have a major influence on IS success for SMEs. However, despite its importance to IS success, relatively little research has focused on the relationship between SMEs and IS consultants and whether this relationship has any impact or influence on the development of IS competences in SMEs. T his study investigates whether consultants compensate for or enhance an SMEs IS competences during a major IS project. A multiple case study approach was adopted involving SMEs who implemented an Accounting Information System (AIS). The case firms prov ide evidence that SMEs lack many IS skills and abilities. The study identified a number of competences that are compensated or enhanced by consultants. The major finding of this study is that IS consultants help SMEs overcome a lack of IS competences, rat her than help develop IS competences within an SME. Managing the relationship between consultant and SME is crucial for SMEs lacking many IS competences.

 

Keywords: Keywords: IS projects, IS consultants, SMEs, competences, Resource-based Theory, Accounting Information System

 

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Journal Article

The Conditions of Complex Innovation Adoption Occurrence „ A Critical Realist Perspective  pp220-230

Marius Mihailescu, Daniela Mihailescu, Sven Carlsson

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: The adoption of innovation is a multifaceted and dynamic phenomenon. It occurs as a result of the interplay between structural influences and agents activities. Although existing studies on innovation have recognised the importance of theories that link the structure, the macro level, and agency, the micro level, in explaining changes over time, few theoretical accounts support the integrations of multiple levels of analysis. The purpose of this paper is to develop an explanatory framework base d on a realist social theory and underpinned by a critical realist perspective, with the intention of describing and explaining IS/IT adoption occurrences. The potential of the framework is empirically illustrated with a case study that examines the adopt ion of one Enterprise Systems Implementation Methodology by implementers in an implementation context. Our qualitative study provides explanatory insights and a rich description of a particular type of complex innovation. Four theoretically and empiricall y grounded modes of adopting an implementation methodology are identified: fragmented, aggregated, integrated and infrastructural. Using the framework allow us to achieve four things. First, the framework will support the researchers in identifying partic ular configurations and the pattern of events caused by them. Second, it will take into account the embeddedness of innovations that have occurred within broader structural configurations. Third, it will allow the researchers to distinguish the different stances agents might adopt toward particular innovations and structural configurations. Fourth, the researchers will be able to identify variations that have occurred in the adoption of innovations. This study offers a foundation for future work that may contribute to a more coherent view on complex innovations and insights into their potential adoption; as such, the findings presented here can provide guidance for practitioners who seek to adopt complex IS/IT innovations.

 

Keywords: Keywords: IS/IT adoption occurrence, enterprise systems implementation methodology, realist social theory, critical realism, morphogenetic approach, modes of reflexivity

 

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Journal Article

The Five‑dimensional Reflective Cycle Framework for Designing Financial Information Management Systems Courses  pp241-254

Hien Minh Thi Tran, Farshid Anvari

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: Financial Information Management Systems (FIMS) or Accounting Information Systems (AIS) is a cross‑discipline subject, often taught by Computing and Accounting disciplines. In recent years, demand for this subject has grown. However, educato rs have lamented high failure rates among AIS students; professional bodies have reported that graduates lack sufficient meta‑cognitive knowledge of information systems to perform their tasks. Students have reported that their knowledge of databases, ente rprise resource planning and relevant technology topics is lacking. Quality teaching of FIMS or AIS requires instructors to actively update their knowledge of accounting systems and information technology as well as to reflect on their teaching techniques . Reflection and reflective practices are taught within the education discipline, and have grown in popularity among many other disciplines. Yet little has been written about how accounting and IT professionals reflect on their practice and how they apply their reflections to their teaching. Through our case study at an Australian university, we discuss (1) the rationale for the importance of constructivist theory, cognitive load theory, reflective and action‑research in teaching and learning, (2) Blo om⠒s Revised Taxonomy, (3) the application of Bloom and the reflective concept for the design and delivery of FIMS courses, (4) reflection on our strategies for applying these concepts (5) how reflective professionals can assist instructors in t he design and delivery of FIMS courses and, (6) how the proposed five‑dimensional reflective cycle framework can assist academics in the design of AIS courses. Our study supports the view that reflection, within the proposed framework, is an effective strategy; and that Bloom⠒s Revised Taxonomy and the PEER Model are tools which can assist instructors to teach FIMS and AIS courses in a way that enhances participant⠒s learning abilities. We present a five‑dimensional reflective cycle framework t hat facilitates reflective practice among academic and prof

 

Keywords: Keywords: constructivist theory, Blooms Revised Taxonomy, active learning, five-dimensional reflective cycle framework, evaluation, financial information management systems, FIMS, accounting information systems, AIS

 

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