The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

ICT Adoption and Use in UK SMEs: a Failure of Initiatives?  pp91-96

G. Harindranath, R. Dyerson, D. Barnes

© Jun 2008 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp51 - 108

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Abstract

In this paper, we explore some of the results from a survey of 378 small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) based in the southeast of England. The objective of this survey was to build a snapshot of the state of play of the information and communications technology (ICT) use by SMEs in economically significant sectors in this region. The sectors chosen were as follows: food processing, transport and logistics, media and internet services. More specifically, the survey was intended to answer the following questions: what types of ICT are in use by SMEs in this region, what prevents and facilitates the adoption and use of ICT amongst these firms, and where do SMEs acquire information on ICT related issues. Our survey suggests that most SMEs in the southeast of England are in general positively inclined towards adoption and use of ICT. However, this adoption and use of ICT is mainly focused on operational matters with few extensions into potential strategic use of such technologies in their business environments. SME ownermanagers perceive ICT to be often costly and complex and are wary of consultants and vendor organisations. We also discovered, somewhat surprisingly, that SMEs are largely unaware of existing policy instruments at the regional, national and European levels, designed to help them in their adoption and use of ICT.

 

Keywords: Information and communications technology, ICT, small and medium sized enterprises, SMEs, ICT adoption, ICT use, government policy

 

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Journal Article

Interpretative IS Evaluation: Results and Uses  pp97-108

Jenny Lagsten, Göran Goldkuhl

© Jun 2008 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp51 - 108

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Abstract

One major reason for doing evaluations of information systems is to take actions based on the results of the evaluation. In order to make better use of interpretive evaluation processes in practice we need to understand what kinds of results such evaluations produce and the way that the results are used to be transformed into change and betterment in the organisation. We have developed, applied and studied a methodology in support for doing interpretive evaluation. In the paper we report the case of a performed action research study that has comprised an IS evaluation. Through this action research we have transformed the theoretical principles of the interpretive approach into a useful evaluation methodology in practice. The main emphasis in this study is on the results and the uses of the evaluation process. We make a brief theoretical overview of interpretive principles for IS evaluation and of the research on evaluation use, from the field of evaluation theory, and represent a framework for analysing influences from evaluation efforts. We use this framework to analyse and identify the results and uses of the performed evaluation in order to shed light on what kinds of results that interpretive evaluation may offer. We experienced the influence framework useful for locating and understanding the variety of results from interpretive evaluation processes. We conclude with a model depicting results and uses from interpretive IS evaluation processes. The main point we elaborate on in this paper is how evaluations influence the actions taken in the organisation in order to establish betterment. How people in the organisation use evaluation in order to establish betterment and change. Further we bounce back the insights on evaluation results and uses into the discussion on how to design interpretive evaluation processes and how to design evaluation methodology in support for those processes.

 

Keywords: IS evaluation, evaluation process, evaluation results, evaluation use, interpretative evaluation methodology

 

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Journal Article

The Influence of net Benefits on Collective, Innovative, Configural System use: a Case Study of Small‑to‑Medium Enterprises  pp129-140

Carla Wilkin

© Feb 2010 Volume 12 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp129 - 198

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Abstract

In today's business world, Small‑to‑Medium enterprises (SMEs) increasingly join their larger counterparts in regarding use of Information Technology (IT) and Information Systems (IS) as fundamental to business operations. For SMEs, investment in packaged software that has not been customized to individual enterprise needs, allows ready access to much of the IT function enjoyed by their larger counterparts. However, given these systems are not exclusively tailored to the enterprise and further given the collective nature of the work‑place in these enterprises, the likelihood increases for work‑arounds and unexpected usage to occur to manage enterprise needs. Studies that explore system use typically focus on individual use. Using an interpretive case study approach, this study considers users of a common system in individually owned SMEs to explore evidence of collective, innovative, configural (CIC) use, the causes of this and its impact on fellow workers. Results provide insight into the role of systems as dynamic business tools and show that despite impacts on financial and operational reporting, CIC use occurs for reasons of operational efficiency and also out of frustration with system functionality. This provides some insight into attitudes concerning Use and Net Benefits in the IS Success Model, which in turn informs system evolution.

 

Keywords: collective use, work-arounds, innovative use, configural use, small-to-medium enterprises, net benefits

 

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Journal Article

A Delphi Examination of Inhibitors of The Effective use of Process Industry Enterprise Resource Planning (Erp) Systems: A Case Study of New Zealands Process Industry  pp116-133

Chidi Gerard Ononiwu

© Nov 2013 Volume 16 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp86 - 161

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Abstract

Abstract: An ERP System is among the core information system (IS) software being adopted in the process industries globally. Such systems are claimed to offer strategic and operational improvement to firms supply chain effectiveness. Prior studies have shown that most adopting firms are not achieving the strategic business value identified in the project justification due to employees ineffective use of the system. The gains that such firms have achieved by implementing ERP systems in terms of increas e in operational efficiency are often accompanied by daunting ineffective usability problems. Building on Technology…Organization…Environment (TOE) theory, Task‑Technology Fit (TTF) theory and the theory of usage inhibition, this study examines the in hibitors of the effective use of ERP systems. The study used the Delphi technique to draw from the experiences of a few ERP adopters from New Zealands process industries. Findings suggest that non‑collaborative training among employees, low absorptive ca pacity and system misfit are the top most critical inhibitors. Others inhibitors include inadequate ERP expertise, ERP default attributes, lack of continuous improvement and poor vendors support. The theoretical and practical implications of these findin gs are discussed in the concluding section.

 

Keywords: Keyword: Enterprise resource planning system, Effective use, Delphi methodology, Process

 

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Journal Article

Developing an Evaluation Instrument for e‑Commerce Web Sites from the First‑Time Buyer's Viewpoint  pp31-42

Wei-Hsi Hung, Robert J McQueen

© Jan 2004 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

This paper presents the process of developing an evaluation instrument specifically for the evaluation of e‑Commerce Web sites from the first‑time buyer's viewpoint. The development process is based on theoretical discussions of the Web evaluation and Web user satisfaction literature. A draft evaluation instrument was developed. To enhance its reliability and validity, several iterative trials on e‑Commerce Web sites were conducted. Some modifications were made to the instrument. The final version is capable of evaluating e‑ Commerce Web sites effectively. The instrument provides implications to both Web evaluation practitioners and academics.

 

Keywords: e-Commerce, Web evaluation, user satisfaction, transaction activity, instrument

 

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Journal Article

An Evaluation Framework for the Acceptance of Web‑Based Aptitude Tests  pp151-158

Michael Amberg, Sonja Fischer, Manuela Schröder

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

Aptitude tests analyse the aptitude of persons for studying at a specific school or university as well as for working within a specific company. Due to the recent technology advances, web‑based solutions are increasingly used for the implementation of aptitude tests. These web‑based aptitude tests can be utilised for rather standardized test methods, testing a large amount of users. Based on the fact that web‑based aptitude tests are getting more and more common, a high user acceptance is important, especially since test results tend to be taken more seriously. Furthermore, the design of the test should be helpful and support the use of the test. In this context, the target of our research is to provide a framework for the evaluation of the user acceptance for web‑based aptitude tests. The research method is based on an exemplary web‑based aptitude test and includes the following steps: Firstly, we used the Dynamic Accep‑ tance Model for the Re‑evaluation of Technologies (DART) as a basis for the adoption of web‑based aptitude tests. DART is an instrument designed for the analysis and evaluation of the user acceptance of innovative technologies, prod‑ ucts or services. Based on a literature review and expert interviews, we identified the most important acceptance indica‑ tors. In a next step, we evaluated the defined acceptance indicators in a survey with test persons who carried out one selected web‑based aptitude test. Afterwards, we analysed the reliability and validity of the developed evaluation frame‑ work. The result shows that a detailed analysis of the influencing factors is generally possible with the use of DART. This approach helps to define a balanced set of measurable acceptance indicators for the evaluation of the user acceptance. Finally, we described lessons learned and the ongoing process to measure the acceptance of web‑based aptitude tests.

 

Keywords: evaluation framework, web-based aptitude test, user acceptance, DART approach

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating the Evaluations: Preconceptions of Project Post‑Mortems  pp65-72

John McAvoy

© Nov 2006 Volume 9 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp45 - 104

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Abstract

For future projects to improve, it is necessary to evaluate the lessons from previous projects. The majority of software methodologies recommend a review of the project to evaluate what worked and what needs improvement. These reviews are commonly referred to as project post‑mortems. Existing research into post‑mortems has found problems with the actual process itself and the use of the output from the process — the lessons learned. This research examines project post‑mortems before the post‑mortem has occurred — it is an examination of the beliefs and attitudes that project members bring with them into post‑mortems. These attitudes can ultimately cause the failure of a post‑ mortem, even before it has begun. It is somewhat paradoxical that team members initially espoused positive views about post‑mortems in a survey, yet further examination of key informants showed that these espoused views did not translate into reality. It is shown how hierarchical groupthink can help to forge negative beliefs and attitudes about post‑mortems that will have a detrimental affect on the process itself.

 

Keywords: project evaluation, hierarchical groupthink, project post-mortem, espoused theory

 

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Journal Article

Heuristically Evaluating Greek e‑Tourism and e‑Museum Websites  pp17-26

Fotis Lazarinis, Dimitris Kanellopoulos, Petros Lalos

© Mar 2008 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 51

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Abstract

The Internet and its World Wide Web service have reshaped the promotion of cultural and tourism products. Well designed and user adaptable e‑commerce websites improve business promotion as they attract more e‑visitors. Multilingualism, dynamic and thus frequently updated content, email communication and searching capabilities are crucial options of websites. In this paper we empirically build an evaluation methodology to assess the technologies and services of Greek e‑tourism and e‑cultural websites. The primary focus of our work is to evaluate the technical capability of tourism and cultural websites and to realize the available options offered to users. A number of tourism e‑commerce websites and e‑museums were randomly selected and their content and technologies were analyzed based on the methodology proposed. The results of this statistical examination are analyzed and discussed. The main conclusion is that although the reviewed websites are rich in multimedia content they need to support customers more efficiently by offering more services or by refining the offered e‑services.

 

Keywords: e-museums, usability of cultural websites, e-tourism, e-commerce

 

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