The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

The Impact of IT investment in RSA e‑Commerce SME Organisations!  pp49-56

Sam Lubbe

© Jan 2004 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

This article considers the possibility of a link between organisational performance and information technology (IT) investment intensity in SME organisations practising e‑Commerce for the period 20012002. The answers to the research questions note that in top performing organisations; (i) IT costs as proportions of operating costs were higher; (ii) IT costs as a proportion of turnover was lower, than in weak performing organisations; and (iii) that a positive correlation exists between the Computerisation Index (CI) and the Operating Costs ratio. The investigation also reveals that Chief Executive Officers (CEO)'s expect additional output while planning e‑Commerce operations and keeping IT budgets constant. Evidence is presented that company performance is linked to the level of IT investment intensity in the sample of organisations investigated, even though more output was expected from the IT department.

 

Keywords: Digital Commerce, e-Commerce, Framework, IT Investment

 

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Journal Article

Seven Ways to get Your Favoured IT Project Accepted — Politics in IT Evaluation  pp31-40

Egon Berghout, Menno Nijland, Kevin Grant

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

IS managers are being put under increasing pressure to justify the value of corporate ITIS expenditure. Their constant quest for the 'holy grail' continues, as existing methods and approaches of justifying ITIS expenditure are still failing to deliver. The decision making process is not as objective and transparent as it is claimed or intended to be. This paper discusses seven commonly used tactics used by business managers to influence IT appraisals. The paper takes a 'devil's advocate' position and adopts some irony when looking at the area of power and politics in IT evaluation. Rather than promoting the use of these techniques, this article aims to raise awareness that IT evaluation is not as rational as most IT evaluation researcherspractitioners would want it to be or indeed claim it to be. It is argued that rationalisation or counter tactics may counteract influence techniques in an attempt to get behind the cloak and dagger side of organisational power and politics, but politics and power in decision‑making cannot and should not be filtered out. Due to dissimilarities of objectives, limitations of time and information, influence techniques will always be used. However, rather than being counterproductive, these techniques are essential in the process of decision making of IT projects. They help organisations reach better decisions, which receive more commitment than decisions that were forced to comply with strictly rational approaches. Awareness of the influence and manipulation techniques used in practice will help to deal with power and politics in IT evaluation and thereby come to better IT investment decisions.

 

Keywords: IT Evaluation, IT Decision Making, IT Assessment, Information Economics, Decision Making, Organisational Power & Politics Information Management

 

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Journal Article

Impact of the Quality of ERP Implementations on Business Value  pp221-230

Oana Velcu

© Jan 2006 Volume 8 Issue 3, ECITE 2005 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp143 - 230

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Abstract

This study compares the financial performance trend of successful and less successful ERP implementers over three years following the implementation. The findings indicate no significant difference in the change in ROA and ROI of the two groups of adopters. Successful ERP adopters however have statistically significant higher efficiency benefits in terms of Asset Turnover and Capital Turnover than the less successful ERP adopters in the first two years after implementation. The findings of this paper reveal no significant contribution of the implementation effort to the suc‑ cess of ERP implementations.

 

Keywords: ERP implementations, IT investments, Business value, Investment quality

 

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Journal Article

Understanding IT Management in SMEs  pp27-34

Paul Cragg, Annette Mills, Theek Suraweera

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

There is evidence in the IT literature indicating that IT management is one factor that influences IT success. In addition, there is much literature indicating that IT management is important in the SME context. However, much of this literature has focused on the important role of the owner and/or other senior managers. For example, Thong et al (1996) focused on top management support and its influence on IT success. This paper argues that top management support is only one aspect of IT management and other aspects of IT management have received little attention in studies of SMEs. The study commenced with a review of the literature which identified many different definitions of IT management. However, the broader management literature indicated that the classical functions of planning, organising, controlling and leading provide an excellent way of conceptualising the many activities involved in managing (Carroll and Gillen, 1987). The management literature also provided working definitions for the four management functions. A multiple‑case study approach was then used to collect evidence from four SMEs (with between four and 50 employees). The data identified IT management practices associated with each of the four IT functions, ie, IT planning, IT organising, IT controlling and IT leading. For example, one firm had an IT committee made up of staff from different levels of the firm. Some on the committee would be assigned specific IT responsibilities, eg, training of other staff. This practice provided an example of IT organising, ie, of defining tasks and assigning personnel. Similarly, many other IT management practices were both identified and classified. The results provide a significant foundation for researchers of IT management in SMEs. For example, the conceptualisation indicates four IT management functions. Also, the definitions clarify important aspects of IT management. The study also indicated that some aspects of IT management have received little attention in prior studies. For example, while IT planning has received considerable attention, IT leading in SMEs has only been examined in the narrower context of top management support. Furthermore, few studies have examined the role and importance of IT organising and IT controlling in the SME context. Thus the study also indicates directions for future research, including the identification of IT management best practices.

 

Keywords: small business, IT management, IT management practices, accounting firms

 

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Journal Article

Improving the Benefits of IT Compliance Using Enterprise Management Information Systems  pp27-38

Renata Paola Dameri

© Jan 2009 Volume 12 Issue 1, ECIME 2008, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 118

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Abstract

During the latest years, IT governance has become more and more important. More of the attention on IT Governance is captured by compliance, owing to the recent financial scandals and the severe rules regarding information systems audit and control. Companies need to comply with these rules, but it requires important investments, considered not only strategic but necessary (Remenyi et. al. 2000). However, companies should analyse the compliance requirements to implement an IT governance system, not only to comply with legal rules, but also to improve the strategic alignment between IT and business and to optimise value creation by IT compliance investments (Ventrakaman and Henderson 1996, Van Grembergen 2003). However, companies have difficulties in implementing IT compliance initiatives, because they are complex and require an integrated approach all over the organization. But IT compliance initiatives often lack an integrated, strategic approach: they only try to comply with the increasing rules affecting IT operations, thereby limiting the value of compliance investments. To optimise IT compliance, companies should develop an IT compliance strategy, aiming not only to accomplish with regulations, but also to bring processes into compliance. That is, to realise a full integration between operations, risk control, data reliability. To reach this result, compliance automated solutions are indicated, like GCR (Governance, Risk and Compliance) applications. However, standard solutions fail to support specific problems and the individual value proposition of each company: an EIMS (Enterprise Information Management Systems), developed in house, allows automatically managed processes, data and information security, to access control and system performance and to improve data usability, in accordance with company specific organisation and needs. In this paper, IT compliance is introduced, to define how to orient it to value creation; GRC systems. EIM systems are described, with their different cost and benefits for companies. The aim of the paper is to define how to develop compliance automated systems, to save money and enhance information integration and value. Observations and conclusions derive from practical experience of the author, participating to a project of EIM implementation in a major Italian company.

 

Keywords: IT governance, risk management, accounting information systems, IT compliance, knowledge management

 

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Journal Article

e‑Commerce Investments from an SME perspective: Costs, Benefits and Processes  pp45-56

Sandra Cohen, Georgila Kallirroi

© Nov 2006 Volume 9 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp45 - 104

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Abstract

The scope of this paper is to investigate whether SMEs take into consideration the cost dimensions (tangible and intangible, direct and indirect) and follow the investment appraisal techniques proposed in literature as relevant and suitable in relation to e‑commerce adoption. More specifically, we analyse the importance placed by the EC adopters on specific cost elements, types of budgets and investment appraisal techniques in relation to EC decision. Furthermore, we aim at understanding the reasons, both quantitative and qualitative, that drive SMEs to embark on such an investment. Our empirical evidence is based on the responses to questions found on a structured questionnaire answered by Greek firms that have already adopted EC. Our findings indicate that cost, in general, is not a major issue for Greek SMEs when deciding to implement EC, while the strategic benefits they aim at gaining from EC applications play a critical role in the adoption decision.

 

Keywords: e-commerce, IT investment, SMEs, IT costs, IT investment appraisal, Greece

 

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Journal Article

Organizational Challenges and Barriers to Implementing IT Governance in a Hospital  pp37-45

Luis Velez Lapao

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

This paper describes the challenges and barriers to the introduction of “IT Governance” into a Hospital environment. It further addresses the relationship between corporate governance (hospital strategy and organization) and the role of IT Governance in managing new services deployment. Both ITIL and COBIT are introduced as a best practice for supporting Hospital Information Systems (HIS) management. IT Governance is an extensive framework; therefore we focused our study on ITIL Assessment combined with COBIT. The assessments were centered on IT Service Management, which, according to our findings, is being carried inefficiently in Hospital São Sebastião (HSS). We used both COBIT and ITIL assessment to audit and identify IT Governance weakness. These processes revealed a way to assist the organization at becoming aware about IT improvement priorities. The results were used to rethink HIS strategy in order to properly address the need to develop new health services like ambulatory surgery and connecting with out‑patients services. We used the IT Governance standard ISO/IEC 38500 to provide guiding principles for the effective use of IT according to Calder‑Moir framework. Starting with a COBIT assessment we identified IT management priorities and metrics, then we focused on the ITIL assessment steps. Finally, we applied the framework on both Service Desk and Incident Management processes. We analyzed the level of IT governance maturity and produce some recommendations to improve IT Service Management practices. The ITIL assessment identified existing gaps between the current organization practices and how the organization should perform according to ITIL, and what key actions need to be taken to close those gaps. At the end disclosed that IT Governance inefficiency is an important barrier to HIS management, mostly in IT service management which has a direct impact in users' daily work flow, and therefore on Healthcare services delivery.

 

Keywords: IT Governance, hospital information systems, IT organization, COBIT, ITIL

 

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Journal Article

Enterprise Architecture Principles and their impact on the Management of IT Investments  pp53-62

Kalevi Pessi, Thanos Magoulas, Mats-Ake Hugoson

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

The strategic role of IT and its significance throughout the organization in¬creases com¬plexity, variety, and the need of change. Hence IT management must deal with uncertainties derived from different, conflicting and ever changing demands. In this sense Enterprise Architecture is playing an increasingly important role in improving IT management practice. If contemporary organizations do not succeed in managing architectural issues, there is a clear risk that considerable resources will be invested without achieving desirable ef¬fects. This paper investigates how Enterprise Architecture Principles impact on the management of IT‑investments in the context of large organizations. The purpose of the paper is to provide a deeper insight of the relationship between Enterprise Architecture and management of IT Investments throughout the elucidation of two significant types of principles: Delineation (differentiation) principles and Interoperability (integration) principles. Our conclusion is that the choice of architectural principles has an impact both on alignment between information systems and business demands and on the management of IT investments. This impact concerns at least four aspects: (1) The responsibility for IT investments (2) Time to value (3) Long term alignment, (4) Coordination of investments in information systems with changes in business processes.

 

Keywords: Enterprise architecture, information systems architecture, business architecture, architectural principles, business value, management of it investments

 

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