The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Performance Evaluation of e‑Business in Australia  pp71-80

Mohini Singh, John Byrne

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

The Internet and related technologies have made a substantial impact on the way organisations conduct business in Australia and around the world. Australian organisations like their international counterparts have invested heavily to leverage the Internet and transform their traditional businesses into e‑businesses in the last seven years. E‑business investments are claiming a sizeable share of overall IT budgets in most organisations whether they are small, medium or large. However, managers are under constant pressure to justify e‑business costs and to ensure that these investments keep paying off. Earlier research on e‑business in Australia addressed issues of the rate of e‑business uptake and the application of the Internet to certain business processes. Research discussed in this paper is one of the first attempts to evaluate the value of e‑business. It is based on data collected, collated and analysed from the responses received from IT and e‑business managers throughout Australia. Research presented in this paper is based on a model developed in the USA (Barua et al, 2001) to identify the impact of e‑business drivers on operational excellence of firms which influence financial improvements. It was initiated to quantify the success of e‑business in Australia after huge losses from e‑business projects were reported by a few large organisations. The paper includes a review of literature on e‑business evaluation, research methodology, analysis techniques, a discussion of e‑business performance in Australia and presents the impact of e‑business on operational excellence and financial performance of the organisation.

 

Keywords: e-business evaluation, B2B e-business, B2C e-business, e-business drivers, e-business operational improvements, e-business financial success

 

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Journal Article

Medical Records System Adoption in European Hospitals  pp89-99

Ana Marques, Tiago Oliveira, Sara Simoes Dias, Maria Fraga O. Martins

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Health Care system has had an ongoing focus on improving access to and quality of care, and more recently on cost reduction. The primary mean to achieve these goals has been to change health care policy, as exemplified by the adoption of health information technology in particular the adoption of patient centred information, characterized by the ability to manage comprehensive patience information such as: medical records; appointments scheduling; theatre management and ward reporting. Different terms are used to refer to these systems including the most common: electronic patient record; electronic medical record; computer based patient record and medical records system (MRS). Despite the importance of these systems in health care, little is known about the adoption. This study addresses the existent research gap by analyzing the adoption of MRS in European hospitals. Study data source is the e‑Business W@tch 2006 decision maker survey, covering 448 hospitals in the European Union. Additional information related to country wealth indicators, was extracted from the EU official statistics and opinion polls website. Variable choice is based on a derivation from the recently introduced framework know as Human, Organization and Technology fit (HOT‑fit) and Technology, Organization and Environment (TOE) framework. Adding the environmental context into the HOT‑fit framework, the Human, Organization, Technology and Environment (HOTE) framework is derivate. HOTE framework identifies four contexts that influence information and communication technologies (ICT) adoption: Technology characteristics including equipment but also processes; Organizational context as size, localization and even managerial structure; Human context relating to ‘User Involvement’; and Environmental context that incorporate the cultural environment of the country and regulatory influence. In order to reduce the number of variables available, a factor analysis (FA) is performed, using the principal component technique with varimax rotation. Three eigen‑value, greater than one are extracted, explaining 69.68% of the variance contained in the data. The three contexts found are: country wealth, competition and technology readiness. To determine the correlation between HOTE framework characteristics and MRS adoption a Logit model is used. For that were used variables obtained from the FA and other variables such as hospital size, education level and research level, gathered directly from the e‑business watch survey. MRS adoption is significantly associated with Education Level, Technology Readiness and Country Wealth. Since MRS adoption may be an organization survival strategy for hospitals to improve quality and efficiency while reducing costs, hospitals that are at risk of missing the wave of implementation should be offered incentives that enable them to implement and maintain patient centred information systems.

 

Keywords: ICT adoption, e-Business, HOTE framework, Hospitals, Factor Analysis, Logit model.

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating e‑Commerce Success — A Case Study  pp15-26

Shaun Pather, Dan Remenyi, Andre de la Harpe

© May 2006 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 43

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Abstract

The business community in the past decade has been characterised by debate over the value or effectiveness of e‑Commerce and how this type of technology needs to be implemented. During this period the business world has witnessed many examples of failures of Internet based business. There is little doubt that the high failure rate in Dot.Coms had much to do with misconceptions regarding the ease with which e‑Commerce could be implemented. Unrealistic expectations caused tried and tested business rules to be abandoned as hyperbole over took sound business sense. Although it is clear today that the Internet and the Web can facilitate business processes to add value to organisations, this technology has to be managed with considerable care. This paper reports on a case study conducted in kalahari.net, a well known South African e‑Tailing business. This case study highlights several valuable lessons to do with the evaluation of an e‑Commerce investment and how to ensure its success. Specifically the case study closely examines aspects of kalahari.net's IS management policy, and identifies a set of preliminary e‑Commerce success dimensions.

 

Keywords: e-Business, e-Commerce, Internet business, web-facilitated business, Information Systems Management, business evaluation, IS success

 

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Journal Article

Firms Patterns of e‑Business Adoption: Evidence for the European Union‑27  pp47-56

Tiago Oliveira, Maria Fraga Martins

© Jan 2010 Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009, Editor: Elizabeth Frisk and Kerstin Grunden, pp1 - 96

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Abstract

Research has shown that firms using e‑business achieve considerable returns through efficiency improvements, inventory reduction, sales increase, customer relationship enhancement, new market penetration, and ultimately financial returns. However, there is little systematic research in terms of e‑business adoption patterns in firms across countries and industries. This study addresses the research gap by analysing the pattern of e‑business adoption by firms across European Union (EU) members. For that, we used the survey data from 6,964 businesses in EU27 members (excluding Malta and Bulgaria). The choice of variables that we will use in our study is based on the technology‑organization‑environment (TOE) theory. In the TOE framework, three aspects may possibly influence e‑business adoption: technological context (technology readiness and technology integration), organizational context (firm size, expected benefits and barriers of e‑business and improved products or services or internal processes) and environmental context (internet penetration and competitive pressure). We performed a factor analysis (FA) of multi‑item indicators to evaluate the validity and to reduce the number of variables. We used the principal component technique with varimax rotation to extract four eigen‑value, which were all greater than one. The first four factors explain 72.4% of variance contained in the data. The four factors found are: expected benefits and obstacles of e‑business, internet penetration, technology readiness and technology integration. These factors are in accordance with the literature review. Afterwards, we performed a cluster analysis (CA) using variables obtained from the FA and the other variables were gathered directly (firm size, employees education, improved products or services or internal processes and competitive pressure) from the e‑Business W@tch survey. In the CA we used hierarchical and non hierarchical methods. We obtained four distinct groups of e‑business adoption. The pattern of these groups suggested that in the European context the most important factor to characterize e‑business adoption is the specific characteristics of the industry and is not the country to which the firms belong.

 

Keywords: e-business adoption, information and communication technology, ICT, technology-organizational-environment, TOE, framework, cluster analysis, CA, European Union, EU, members

 

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Journal Article

Searching for e‑Business Performance Measurement Systems  pp1-8

David Barnes, Matthew Hinton

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Organisations of all kinds continue to expand their involvement in e‑business. This requires considerable financial investment in IT, in processes and in people. It might be expected that there would be a concern to ensure that performance measurement systems are capable of justifying these investments, and of evaluating their worth once implemented. The paper describes research aimed at determining the exact nature of such e‑business performance measurement systems and the benefits that accrue from their use. The research uses a case study methodology to report the performance measurement practices of twelve potentially exemplar organisations that have made efforts to develop distinctive performance metrics for e‑business. Qualitative data was collected from interviews with key informants from each organisation. Additional data came from company documents. The cases reveal a variety of approaches to e‑business performance measurement, with no common framework apparent. Whilst there is considerable disparity in the level of success achieved in developing suitable measures, there is evidence of a common concern to link e‑business performance to organisational objectives. However, there is a general reluctance to embark on major overhauls of existing performance measurement systems. The paper discusses the possible reasons for this and the implications for future developments in e‑business performance measurement practices.

 

Keywords: e-business, performance measurement systems, IT evaluation

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 2 / Nov 2006  pp45‑104

Editor: Dan Remenyi

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Editorial

Once again we have received an interesting range of research papers from authors around the world and furthermore they continue to represent a very wide range of thought with regards to the different applications of evaluation thinking for information and communication technology. It is clear that this field has not yet produced a clear consensus as to any particular methodology and I for one believe that this is what one might loosely call a “good thing”.

Six papers have been selected by our reviewers through the process or double‑blind peer review and this has produced six very interesting and yet different papers from authors in Sweden, Spain, The Netherlands, Ireland and Greece.

I trust readers will find these pieces of research as interesting as I have.

 

Keywords: IS integration, activity-based costing, assessment, business evaluation, cost management systems, e-business, e-commerce, enterprise modelling, evaluation framework, event study methodology, information systems effectiveness, information systems management, information systems quality, information technology productivity paradox, internet business, IS success, IT investment, process capability, project portfolio, risk management, software process maturity, system analysis metrics, value-at-risk, web-facilitated business

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 13 Issue 1, ECIME 2009 / Jan 2010  pp1‑96

Editor: Elizabeth Frisk, Kerstin Grunden

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Editorial

This issue represents papers presented at the 3rd European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation. The conference was held in September 2009 at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

 

Keywords: accounting firms, adoption, adoption barriers, business case, case study, cluster analysis (CA), collaborative technology (CT) business education, competitive advantage, complexity, computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), developing countries, developing countries, diffusion of innovation, e-Business adoption, e-government, e-Government portal, enterprise, ERP, European Union (EU) members, EUS, evaluation, executive information system, health informatics, HealthCare information systems, ICT, information and communication technology (ICT), information technology, integration, IT management practices, Jordan., mixed research, performance strategic value, post-implementation evaluation, RFID, satisfaction, small business, supply chain management, sustainability, TAM, technology-organizational-environment (TOE) framework, video conferencing, video-ethnography

 

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