The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Adding Action to the Information Audit  pp271-281

Huan Vo-Tran

© Sep 2011 Volume 14 Issue 2, ICIME 2011, Editor: Ken Grant, pp167 - 281

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Abstract

The Information Audit (IA) has long been seen as an important tool within the Information Management field, with its origins stemming from financial audits. It is used extensively in libraries as an improvement tool and, although many have tried to define it, such as Guy St. Clair (1997), Orna (1999) and Henczel (2001a), there is still no general consensus on a definition, or the steps taken to achieve it. Whatever form it may take, it is agreed that to undertake such a task requires a structured approach. The following study will propose a hybrid approach in which Henczels seven‑stage Information Audit model will be coupled with the Action Research (AR) methodology in order to assist a mid‑sized architectural practice to manage their information throughout the architectural design process, and, in particular, as they attempt to design a new academic building for a prominent Australian university.

 

Keywords: information audit, information management, architectural design process, action research

 

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Journal Article

The Five‑dimensional Reflective Cycle Framework for Designing Financial Information Management Systems Courses  pp241-254

Hien Minh Thi Tran, Farshid Anvari

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: Financial Information Management Systems (FIMS) or Accounting Information Systems (AIS) is a cross‑discipline subject, often taught by Computing and Accounting disciplines. In recent years, demand for this subject has grown. However, educato rs have lamented high failure rates among AIS students; professional bodies have reported that graduates lack sufficient meta‑cognitive knowledge of information systems to perform their tasks. Students have reported that their knowledge of databases, ente rprise resource planning and relevant technology topics is lacking. Quality teaching of FIMS or AIS requires instructors to actively update their knowledge of accounting systems and information technology as well as to reflect on their teaching techniques . Reflection and reflective practices are taught within the education discipline, and have grown in popularity among many other disciplines. Yet little has been written about how accounting and IT professionals reflect on their practice and how they apply their reflections to their teaching. Through our case study at an Australian university, we discuss (1) the rationale for the importance of constructivist theory, cognitive load theory, reflective and action‑research in teaching and learning, (2) Blo om⠒s Revised Taxonomy, (3) the application of Bloom and the reflective concept for the design and delivery of FIMS courses, (4) reflection on our strategies for applying these concepts (5) how reflective professionals can assist instructors in t he design and delivery of FIMS courses and, (6) how the proposed five‑dimensional reflective cycle framework can assist academics in the design of AIS courses. Our study supports the view that reflection, within the proposed framework, is an effective strategy; and that Bloom⠒s Revised Taxonomy and the PEER Model are tools which can assist instructors to teach FIMS and AIS courses in a way that enhances participant⠒s learning abilities. We present a five‑dimensional reflective cycle framework t hat facilitates reflective practice among academic and prof

 

Keywords: Keywords: constructivist theory, Blooms Revised Taxonomy, active learning, five-dimensional reflective cycle framework, evaluation, financial information management systems, FIMS, accounting information systems, AIS

 

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Journal Article

Seven Ways to get Your Favoured IT Project Accepted — Politics in IT Evaluation  pp31-40

Egon Berghout, Menno Nijland, Kevin Grant

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

IS managers are being put under increasing pressure to justify the value of corporate ITIS expenditure. Their constant quest for the 'holy grail' continues, as existing methods and approaches of justifying ITIS expenditure are still failing to deliver. The decision making process is not as objective and transparent as it is claimed or intended to be. This paper discusses seven commonly used tactics used by business managers to influence IT appraisals. The paper takes a 'devil's advocate' position and adopts some irony when looking at the area of power and politics in IT evaluation. Rather than promoting the use of these techniques, this article aims to raise awareness that IT evaluation is not as rational as most IT evaluation researcherspractitioners would want it to be or indeed claim it to be. It is argued that rationalisation or counter tactics may counteract influence techniques in an attempt to get behind the cloak and dagger side of organisational power and politics, but politics and power in decision‑making cannot and should not be filtered out. Due to dissimilarities of objectives, limitations of time and information, influence techniques will always be used. However, rather than being counterproductive, these techniques are essential in the process of decision making of IT projects. They help organisations reach better decisions, which receive more commitment than decisions that were forced to comply with strictly rational approaches. Awareness of the influence and manipulation techniques used in practice will help to deal with power and politics in IT evaluation and thereby come to better IT investment decisions.

 

Keywords: IT Evaluation, IT Decision Making, IT Assessment, Information Economics, Decision Making, Organisational Power & Politics Information Management

 

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Journal Article

An Evidence‑Based Approach to Scoping Reviews  pp46-52

Antonio Hidalgo Landa, Istvan Szabo, Liam Le Brun, Ian Owen, Graham Fletcher

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

Scoping reviews are used to assess the extent of a body of literature on a particular topic, usually in order to ensure that further research in that area is a beneficial addition to world knowledge. It is typically the first stage of a research project, informing the following work, and so can have a significant impact on both methods and results. Without systematic methods, reviews are subject to personal and community biases, whether intended or not. Evidence‑based science is a broad collection of techniques intended to improve research quality by methodically analysing documented relevant facts, rather than relying on expert opinion. Systematic reviews are a key element and are used in many fields from medicine to public policy to engineering. We propose a repeatable, documented, evidence‑based approach to search and manage the literature, in order to assure demonstrated objectivity of the resulting review. Software tools are prototyped, issues identified and some resolved.It is not clear from the three test cases whether the effort spent in researching, designing and developing the guidelines directly outweighs expert‑based reviews. Further applications of the guidelines and comparative tests are needed.

 

Keywords: Evidence-based protocols, systematic review, literature review, information management

 

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Journal Article

The SIGLIC System for Improving the Access to Surgery in Portugal  pp160-166

Pedro Gomes, Luis Velez Lapao

© Jan 2011 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue, Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto, pp1 - 166

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Abstract

This paper describes the design and first results of an information system (SIGLIC) that supports the new integrated management program (SIGA) to improve the access to surgery in Portugal. SIGIC, the Ministry of Health’s agency responsible for access to surgery management, started re‑thinking the system in 2005 by re‑defining key processes and workflows. The designed information system SIGLIC integrates all hospitals with surgery with every other hospital, where it picks the data to allow the search for optimal solutions for each patient. In the context of SIGIC (Waiting List for Surgery's Integrated Management System) “access” means to assure the treatment by services in terms of quality, standards, equity, process and transparency. The existence of a significant number of patients waiting for treatment that exceed the clinical acceptable times has ominous consequences not only for the individuals (increasing suffering, reduce treatment success, more complex treatments) but also for the society (more expensive use of resources, higher absenteeism, etc), which made the government to create SIGIC program. SIGIC's goals are to reduce waiting time for surgery, to apply identical standards to all patients, to profit from good use of resources and, to create a national structure of homogeneous information based in a system of data collection. The methodology followed was to: a) “survey of information systems and technology in Demand/Supply/Resources”; b) “institutionalization and monitoring of procedural standards for management of the Waiting List for Surgery (WLS)”, c) provide “evaluation by results” and, d) “Correction of deviations to the standard”. To fulfill SIGIC’s objectives it was created a management model (SIGA) and SIGLIC to support it. By now 57 public hospitals and 96 private clinics and hospitals (with convention in SIGIC) had joined the SIGIC network. The Information model include the following items: information on patients and events to allow “Process management”, “clinical information” for “Disease Management” and “financial data” to allow management between the health units, from which data is gathered to improve access management. The information is recorded by hospitals in accordance with a set of standards and integrated into the central database of SIGIC. The quality of integrated information from the hospitals is guaranteed by a set of tools to validate its consistency, rejecting non‑compliant data. The information is recorded in hospitals throughout the process of managing the patient on WLS and integrated daily in the central database. The results since 2005 show the importance of an integrated information system to overcome the bureaucracy: There was a 36% improvement in number of scheduled surgical episodes and 60% reduction in days on waiting time.

 

Keywords: waiting list for surgery, information systems, organizational processes, health information management

 

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Journal Article

Assessing Information Management Competencies in Organisations  pp179-192

Andy Bytheway

© Sep 2011 Volume 14 Issue 2, ICIME 2011, Editor: Ken Grant, pp167 - 281

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Abstract

The history of the management of information systems includes many ideas that were intended to simplify the complexities of the management task, but there is still a great deal of wasted investment that produces no significant benefits. Much of the thinking has been rational and structured, but it can be argued that structured thinking will not solve the problems presented by the ever‑increasing scope and depth of information systems, the need for improved responsiveness and agility, and the need to deal with a range of requirements that are sometimes behavioural and sometimes legislative. Three of the more frequently cited frameworks for information management (Zachman, Henderson & Venkatraman, Ward), are briefly reviewed and found to have common characteristics. They are combined into a new, simple arrangement of the central (and critically important) ideas. This new framework has been used as the basis of a survey instrument that is introduced and explained; it works at two levels ‑ the "micro" and "macro" levels. It assesses perceptions of organisational capability to manage information well, as seen by respondents who are normally employees working in different roles with varying responsibilities. The survey instrument comes with an analysis and reporting package that is found to be suitable for the needs of busy managers, and the way in which micro and macro data is presently analysed and presented is demonstrated using data from a reference dataset, a CIO workshop, an investigation within a real estate agency and a large financial services organisation. The contribution of this work to the research programme from which it emanated is summarised and future directions briefly explained.

 

Keywords: information management, perceptions, IS/IT strategy, alignment, assessment

 

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Journal Article

Privacy Lost ‑ and Found? The information value chain as a model to meet citizens concerns  pp200-210

John van de Pas, Geert-Jan van Bussel

© Sep 2015 Volume 18 Issue 2, The special issue from ECIME 2014, Editor: Jan Devos, pp93 - 210

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Abstract

Abstract: In this paper we explore the extent to which privacy enhancing technologies (PETs) could be effective in providing privacy to citizens. Rapid development of ubiquitous computing and the internet of things are leading to Big Data and the appl ication of Predictive Analytics, effectively merging the real world with cyberspace. The power of information technology is increasingly used to provide personalised services to citizens, leading to the availability of huge amounts of sensitive data about individuals, with potential and actual privacy‑eroding effects. To protect the private sphere, deemed essential in a state of law, information and communication systems (ICTs) should meet the requirements laid down in numerous privacy regulations. Sens itive personal information may be captured by organizations, provided that the person providing the information consents to the information being gathered, and may only be used for the express purpose the information was gathered for. Any other use of in formation about persons without their consent is prohibited by law; notwithstanding legal exceptions. If regulations are properly translated into written code, they will be part of the outcomes of an ICT, and that ICT will therefore be privacy compliant. We conclude that privacy compliance in the technological sense cannot meet citizens concerns completely, and should therefore be augmented by a conceptual model to make privacy impact assessments at the level of citizens lives possible.

 

Keywords: Keywords: privacy, privacy enhancing technology, digital archiving, information value chain, big data, information management

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 14 Issue 1, ECIME 2010 Special Issue / Jan 2011  pp1‑166

Editor: Miguel de Castro Neto

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Editorial

miguel_neto Dr Miguel de Castro Neto is presently Associate Dean at the Instituto Superior de Estatística e Gestão de Informação of the Universidade Nova de Lisboa (ISEGI‑UNL), where he is Invited Assistant Professor. He is editor of the Journal of Information Technology in Agriculture (JITAg), member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Online Information Review journal, and Scientific Advisor of the Revista Brasileira de Agroinformática.  Miguel de Castro Neto holds a PhD in Agronomic Engineering (Universidade Técnica de Lisboa) in the field of Internet‑based agricultural information systems, a Masters degree in Agricultural Economics (Universidade de Évora), a Masters degree extension in Statistics and Information Management (Universidade Nova de Lisboa) and a degree in Agricultural Engineering (Universidade de Évora).His research interests include Business Intelligence, Knowledge management and Social Computing.

Editorial

This special edition of the EJISE includes thirteen selected papers presented at the 4th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation ‑ ECIME 2010 which were considered the most important contributions to the advances in the information systems evaluation field of study.

The conference was held at Instituto Superior de Estatística e Gestão from the Universidade Nova de Lisboa (ISEGI‑UNL), Lisbon, Portugal, and the broad topics proposed to be addressed by ECIME 2010 included: evaluation topics; management topics; e‑Government topics; new technologies, innovation and infrastructures; development topics; ethics and philosophy topics; and general topics.

These topics where covered by the presentation in the conference of 47 Papers, 4  PhD Research Papers, and 4 Work in Progress with participants coming from 25 different countries splitted in the following streams: Managing Information; Evaluation of Records and Documents; Business Intelligence; ICT issues as they specifically affect SMEs; Logistics, Supply Chain and Process Improvement; Performance assessment and measurement; Web Tools; Health Information Systems; Evaluation Issues; Health Information Systems Issues; Quality and Service Level; and IS professionals.

The 13 ECIME 2010 selected papers for publishing in this EJISE special issue cover a very wide range of interesting and up to date research areas giving us important insights and new perspectives in future developments in the field and I hope it can became an important contribution to the dynamics in the information systems evaluation research area.

 

Keywords: action research, adopter categories, adoption, adoption determinants, alliances, architectural principles, BAN, business architecture, business value, CDSS, COBIT, community, computing, consumer goods, decision-making, diffusion of innovations (DOI) theory, digital divide, disadvantaged networks, early warning scorecard, eCommerce, enterprise architecture, evidence-based protocols, factors, GDS (Global Data Synchronization), geobrowser, georeference, GIS (Geographical Information System), GLN (Global Location Numbering), global standards, GoogleEarth, GTIN (Global Trade Items Numbering), GUSI (Global Upstream Supply Initiative), health informatics and body area networks, health information management, hospital information systems, information alignment, information management, information quality, information quality, information systems, information systems architecture, information technology, institutional theory, integrated suppliers, interorganizational systems (IOSs), interpretiv

 

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